Bibliography - Transport: Rivers and canals
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Chichester Canal Act, published 1585 (pamphlet, Chichester Canal Act) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 5911]

An Actual Survey of the County of Sussex divided into Rapes Hundreds and Deanryes. In which the exact longitude and latitude of all the remarkable places are determined from observation. Also an accurate delineation by admeasurement of the sea-coast, roads and the rivers so far as navigable, by Richard Budgen, published 1723

Reports on the Grand Ship Canal from London to Arundel Bay and Portsmouth with an Abstract of Messrs. Rennie and Giles Report Thereon, Also an Estimate of the Probable Expense & Revenue, With Plan and Section of Approved Line of Canal; Tribute to the Lords Commissioners; etc, by Nicholas Wilcox Cundy and John Rennie, published 1827 (William Clowes) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

Rambles by Rivers: The Duddon, the Mole; the Adur, Arun & Wey; the Leas; the Dove, by James Thorne, published 1844 (London: Charles Knight & Co.) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries   View Online

Account of an Ancient Canoe found at Burpham near the River Arun, on the Property of Thomas Spencer Esq., of Warningcamp, by Unknown Author(s), published 1858 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 10, article, pp.147-150) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2095] & The Keep [LIB/500229] & S.A.S. library   View Online

The Rivers of Sussex. Part I. Eastern Division, by Mark Antony Lower, M.A., F.S.A., published 1863 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 15, article, pp.148-164) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2100] & The Keep [LIB/500234] & S.A.S. library   View Online

The Rivers of Sussex. Part II, by Mark Antony Lower, M.A., F.S.A., published 1864 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 16, article, pp.247-272) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2101] & The Keep [LIB/500235] & S.A.S. library   View Online

The River Ems, by John H. Sperling, published 1866 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 18, notes & queries, p.185) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2103] & The Keep [LIB/500237] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Remarks on the Ancient Course of the River Rother, by Thomas Elliott, published 1877 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 27, article, pp.166-176) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2112] & The Keep [LIB/500245] & S.A.S. library   View Online

On the Site of Portus Adurni and the River Adur, by F. Haverfield, M.A., F.S.A., published 1892 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 38, notes & queries, pp.217-221) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2123] & The Keep [LIB/500256] & S.A.S. library   View Online

The Site of Portus Adurni and the River Adur, by H. F. Napper, published 1894 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 39, notes & queries, pp.220-221) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2124] & The Keep [LIB/500257] & S.A.S. library   View Online

The Passage of the Arun at North Stoke , by A. Hadrian Allcroft, M.A., published February 1926 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. I no. 1, article, pp.5-7) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8950] & The Keep [LIB/500203] & S.A.S. library

Rivers in Ardingly , by Mary S. Holgate, published February 1926 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. I no. 1, note, pp.19-21) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8950] & The Keep [LIB/500203] & S.A.S. library

Changes in the Arun Estuary , by S. E. Winbolt, M.A., published May 1926 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. I no. 2, note, pp.42-43) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8950] & The Keep [LIB/500203] & S.A.S. library

Rambles in Sussex, No 6. Brighton to the Ouse Valley and Lewes, by H. J. Sibley, published 1927 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. I no. 12, article, pp.520-521) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2303][Lib 8326] & The Keep [LIB/500137]

The Passage of the Arun at North Stoke 1927 , by C. J. Gilbert, F.G.S., published February 1927 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. I no. 5, article, pp.133-134) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8950] & The Keep [LIB/500203] & S.A.S. library

The Passage of the Arun at North Stoke , by A. Hadrian Allcroft, M.A., published May 1927 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. I no. 6, article, pp.167-168) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8950] & The Keep [LIB/500203] & S.A.S. library

A Saunter up the Sussex Ouse, by W. A. Elvidge, published 1928 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. II no. 9, article, pp.402-403) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9327] & The Keep [LIB/500138]

A Sussex River Regatta, by F. S. Blomfield, published 1929 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. III no. 8, article, pp.581-582) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2307] & The Keep [LIB/500140]

The Ancient Bridges of the South of England, by E. Jervoise, published 1930 (xvi + 128 pp., London: Architectural Press) accessible at: & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Review by G. Forrester Scott in Sussex Notes & Queries, November 1930:
Modern road traffic has struck heavily at our ancient bridges: in response to demands for greater strength and width the engineer is dealing destruction to one of the greatest charms of the English highway. M. Jervoise's book is invaluable both as a call to save what remains by timely and conservative repair, and as a record of treasures which may soon succumb to the needs of "progressive" travel. It describes notable bridges in the counties south of the Thames, with the exception of Cornwall and Devon, which are dealt with elsewhere. With the help of the many excellent photographs here reproduced we are able to realise the wealth of fine mediaeval bridges still doing their duty in sound condition and with little alteration from their original design. Among these the examples at Aylesford in Kent, New Bridge on the Upper Thames, Stanton Drew and Wyke Champflower in Somerset, and Coombe-Basset in Wiltshire are especially noteworthy. Of later date, down to the close of the eighteenth century, when brick first made its appearance in bridge-building, are Redbridge on the Test, Pill on the Yeo, Sonning on the Thames and Corsham on the Bristol Avon. Sussex, it must be confessed, makes a poor showing in comparison with some of the western shires. Its streams are neither many nor large, and its bridge-architecture lacks in general the grand manner. There are few instances even approaching the length or the beauty of the noble seven arches at Stopham. The eastern Rother and the Ouse show little of interest, beyond the brick bridges at Robertsbridge and Bodiam, and the stone one at Newenden, built, as a tablet in the parapet records, jointly by the counties of Sussex and Kent in 1706. A stone bridge at Uckfield was destroyed in 1859. In West Sussex several mediaeval or Tudor bridges were rebuilt in the 18th and 19th centuries, including those at Bramber, Greatham, Houghton and Arundel; there are survivals at Durford, Trotton, Woolbeding Fittleworth and Habin. Stopham is probably not earlier than the middle of the 16th century. Sussex can show few historical records concerning its old bridges, or traces of bequests or pontages. A MS. describing the Arun bridges early in the 17th century has been edited by Mr. Joseph Fowler, M.A., and in the Act of 27 Elizabeth and the Turnpike Act of 1696 there are references to the subject.
While Sussex archaeologists should use all their powers to protect the few fine specimens of ancient work which the county contains, they should not neglect even the humblest. In many cases little bridges over minor streams, picturesque if only of Georgian dullness, have been replaced by hideous contrivances of the County Council in raw concrete or of insolent brick with gas-pipe parapets. Such a book as that before us ought to quicken the inertia of public opinion towards the defence of one of the most characteristic charms of our English landscape.

Waters of Arun. I - The Ford at North Stoke, by A. Hadrian Allcroft, M.A., published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 2, article, pp.105-111) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500172]

Waters of Arun. II - The Wild Brooks, by A. Hadrian Allcroft, M.A., published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 3, article, pp.223-231) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500172]

Waters of Arun. III - The Manor of North Stoke, by A. Hadrian Allcroft, M.A., published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 4, article, pp.320-324) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500172]

Waters of Arun. IV - Shallow Waters, by A. Hadrian Allcroft, M.A., published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 5, article, pp.422-426) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500172]

Waters of Arun. V - Arundel Bridge, by A. Hadrian Allcroft, M.A., published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 6, article, pp.468-472) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500172]

Waters of Arun. VI - The Port of Arundel, by A. Hadrian Allcroft, M.A., published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 7, article, pp.609-615) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500173]

Waters of Arun. VII - The Keepers of the Keys, by A. Hadrian Allcroft, M.A., published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 8, article, pp.691-697) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500173]

Waters of Arun. VIII - The Manor of Nonneminstre, by A. Hadrian Allcroft, M.A., published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 9, article, pp.763-767) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500173]

Waters of Arun. IX - Flood, by A. Hadrian Allcroft, M.A., published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 10, article, pp.883-892) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500173]

Waters of Arun. X - High Water, by A. Hadrian Allcroft, M.A., published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 11, article, pp.960-965) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500173]

The Waters of Arun, by A. Hadrian Allcroft, published 1931 (London: Methuen Publishing Ltd.) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2757] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Review in Sussex Notes and Queries, May 1931:
This interesting book has been published in instalments in the Sussex County Magazine during 1930 and is now issued in one volume. The lamented death of its gifted author took place before it was in print and the duty of seeing it through the press has been a labour of love by his friend Dr. Eliot Curwen.
It is a most careful study of the river and its shifting course and is an excellent example of the right combination of documentary history and of what may be called Field-Work although applied to a river.

The Ouse in the 16th and 17th Centuries, by F. G. Morris, M.A., F.R.G.S., published 1931 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. V no. 4, article, pp.293-296) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2310] & The Keep [LIB/500174]

The Spirit of the Ouse, by James Turle and Christie Cheale, published 1931 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. V no. 8, article, pp.523-526) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2310] & The Keep [LIB/500174]

Waters of Arun , by Allen Mawer, published May 1933 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. IV no. 6, note, p.183) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2203][Lib 8222][Lib 8861] & The Keep [LIB/500206] & S.A.S. library

A Bygone Bargeway - Wey and Arun Canal, by F. S. Blomfield, published 1934 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. VIII no. 4, article, pp.233-236) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9329] & The Keep [LIB/500177]

River Angling in Sussex, by Geoffrey Clarke, published 1934 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. VIII no. 9, article, pp.556-557) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9329] & The Keep [LIB/500178]

The Rye River Barges, by Leopold A. Vidler, published 1935 in Mariners' Mirror (vol. 21, 40. 4, article, pp.378-394)
Abstract:
The Rye River barge was a simple design used in three nearby rivers: the Rother, the Brede, and the Tillingham

The Left Bank of the Ouse, by Eva Bretherton, published 1935 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IX no. 7, article, pp.420-422) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9330] & The Keep [LIB/500180]

Branches and Bridges of the Arun. I - Bridges in General and the Head of the Arun, by S. E. Winbolt, M.A., published 1937 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. XI no. 5, article, pp.311-316) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2316][Lib 9332] & The Keep [LIB/500182]

Branches and Bridges of the Arun. II - The Arun through Horsham, by S. E. Winbolt, M.A., published 1937 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. XI no. 6, article, pp.375-380) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2316][Lib 9332] & The Keep [LIB/500182]

Branches and Bridges of the Arun. III - The River Oak, by S. E. Winbolt, M.A., published 1937 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. XI no. 7, article, pp.435-438) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2316][Lib 9332] & The Keep [LIB/500182]

Branches and Bridges of the Arun. IV - The Hindhead and Haslemere Sources, by S. E. Winbolt, M.A., published 1937 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. XI no. 8, article, pp.514-520) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2316][Lib 9332] & The Keep [LIB/500182]

Branches and Bridges of the Arun. V - Arun in Mid-Weald and the Blackdown Branch, by S. E. Winbolt, M.A., published 1937 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. XI no. 9, article, pp.577-584) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2316][Lib 9332] & The Keep [LIB/500182]

Branches and Bridges of the Arun. VI - The High Stream to the Sea, by S. E. Winbolt, M.A., published 1937 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. XI no. 10, article, pp.649-656) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2316][Lib 9332] & The Keep [LIB/500182]

Shipwrights on the Ouse (ref: pp.157-8), by Laurence F. Field, published November 1937 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. VI no. 8, reply, pp.252-253) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 12537][Lib 8863][Lib 8224] & The Keep [LIB/500208] & S.A.S. library

The geomorphology of the rivers of the Southern Weald: Weald Research Committee Communication No. 28, by J. F. Kirkaldy, M.Sc., F.G.S. and A. J. Bull, Ph.D., F.G.S., published 1940 in The Proceedings of the Geologists' Association London (no. 51 issue 2, article, pp.115-150)   View Online
Abstract:
In a recent communication one of the authors dealt with the evidence of periods of 'still-stand' shown by the bevelled spurs of the South Downs. The present paper is an attempt to extend the investigation over a wider area and through a greater period of geological time. It is hoped that by combining the evidence of the Downland spurs with that of the drainage plan, longitudinal profiles and drift deposits of the rivers Cuckmere, Ouse, Adur and Rother-Arun and the raised beaches and infilled valleys of the Coastal Plain of Sussex, a clearer picture than hitherto available of the events of the later stages of geological time in the Southern Weald will be obtained.

Romance of a river [Arun]: [Stopham, Bignor, Burphem, Arundel, Houghton], by Country Life contributor(s), published 13 July 1951 in Country Life (article, pp.106-108) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library

Map of Rother and Arun, by G. D. J. [G. D. Johnston], published November 1951 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XIII no. 8, note, p.186) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8231] & The Keep [LIB/500215] & S.A.S. library

The Estuary of the Adur, by H. C. Brookfield, published 1952 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 90, article, pp.153-163) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2175] & The Keep [LIB/500339] & S.A.S. library

The Meeting of Rother and Arun, by G. D. Johnston, published May 1953 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XIII nos. 13 & 14, article, pp.272-275) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8231] & The Keep [LIB/500215] & S.A.S. library

The Sussex Rivers, by David L. Linton, published November 1956 in Geography (vol. 41, no. 4, article, pp.233-247, Geographical Association) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/507956]   View Online

The Chichester Canal, by F. D. Heneghan, published 1958 (Chichester City County) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

The Chichester Canal, by Francis W. Steer, F.S.A., published 1958 (Chichester Papers no. 11, Chichester City Council)

Towing Paths in Sussex, by G. D. Johnston, published May 1958 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XV no. 1, article, pp.7-13) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8233] & The Keep [LIB/500217] & S.A.S. library

The Mouth of the Arun, by G. D. Johnston, published May 1960 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XV no. 5, article, pp.149-154) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8233] & The Keep [LIB/500217] & S.A.S. library

Gibbons' Bridges, by Paul Adorian and G. D. Johnston, published May 1960 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XV no. 5, note, pp.167-168) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8233] & The Keep [LIB/500217] & S.A.S. library

The Eastern Rother, by Robert H. Goodsall, published 1961 (London: Constable) accessible at: & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Review by G. D. J. [G. D. Johnston] in Sussex Notes and Queries, November 1961:
The illustrations (by the Author) are excellent, but the letterpress is superficial and falls far below the standard of the Author's previous books on the Kentish Stour and the Medway. There are many omissions (space for which could have been provided by leaving out the quite extraneous matter at pp. 46-49 and 101-104) and mistakes or misleading statements. The most noticeable omission is of any reference to Rye New Harbour (the "canal" from Winchelsea to Cliff End is treated as part of the Royal Military Canal) and the formation of the Rock Channel and the ambitious scheme of diverting the Rother to join the Tillingham and Brede and reversing the direction of flow of their lower courses. Sir James de Echingham and Isabella Aucher are not mentioned (Knel's dam is identified with Spit's Wall) and the long drawn-out litigation (from 1630 to Lord Chancellor Clarendon's decree) as to the diversion of the Rother from north to south of Oxney is not dealt with and the diversion itself is dated (p. 81) as 1736 instead of 1636 (a misprint occurring in Hasted's Kent). Scots Flat (usually "Float") Sluice is merely mentioned (p. 93 but ignored at p. 125) with no reference to the riots here or to the trial at the Croydon Assizes. The date of Witherenden Bridge "perhaps a hundred years or more" appears from date stones to be 1799 (see S.N.Q. x. 62); Newenden Bridge is mentioned by name considerably before 1365 and the county boundary does not here run along the south bank (Sussex has always repaired half the bridge); "Wham" (p. 137 but not indexed) is usually "Iham"; Rochester Bridge never belonged to the City; Pound Bridge (p. 20) is not over the Rother, but over the tributary Furnace Stream; Udiam Bridge and its road were entirely new made under a turnpike Act of 1841 and another curious statement (p. 128) is that in 1289 Rye was incorporated as "The Royal Borough of Rye."

The Arun and Western Rother, by Robert H. Goodsall, published 1962 (196 pp., London: Constable) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 10237] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Review by G. D. J. [G. D. Johnston] in Sussex Notes and Queries, May 1963:
The author says in his "Foreword" that the inevitable wind of change may well have rendered certain statements not now completely accurate: a similar condition can be applied to parts of the historic narrative. The text is to a considerable extent based on the Water Bailiff's MS. of 1638 (edited by Thomas Fowler) and on Hadrian Allcroft's Waters of Arun omitting later new light and criticism: in particular Sussex Notes and Queries does not seem to have been consulted.
The statements (p. 151) that the Town of Arundel has derived its name from the river and (p. 96) that the Rotherbridge took its name from the farm are no doubt mere slips but the reader is warned to receive many other statements with caution or doubt - for instance (p. 42) Affleden alias Dedisham Bridge still exists considerably above the Roman and later Alfoldean Bridges, bears the date 1710, and the road over it is given as an alternative route by the older road guides and the author mentions it at p. 43 without name; (p. 180) the towpath below Arundel was on the right (not left) bank; (p. 21) Tan Bridge, Horsham - which probably took its name from a tanyard - was only a clapper bridge until the Turnpike Trustees in 1764 rebuilt it to take the turnpike road to Steyning (not Worthing until 1802); (p. 49) the Wey and Arun Canal was wound up compulsorily (see the report in L.R. 4. Eq. 197) and not voluntarily; and why is Easebourne (the Mother Parish of Midhurst) described (p. 91) as its suburb?
Lodge Bridge or Lodsbridge is a very old name for the bridge over the Rother which the author calls Selham Bridge (correctly the name of the bridge over the tributary just east of the church): Lodsbridge and Lodsbridge Mill have always been in the parish of Lodsworth and not Selham, and the mill has not been demolished but converted into living accommodation.
Reference to the Society's Collections and Notes and Queries would no doubt have altered the Author's accounts of many of the bridges and of the various and shifting mouths of the Arun.
The illustrations however are excellent.

Two Vanished Bridges on the Cuckmere, by Richard Gilbert, published May 1963 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVI no. 1, article, pp.4-6) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8234] & The Keep [LIB/500218] & S.A.S. library

Vanished Cuckmere Bridges, by Richard Gilbert, published May 1963 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVI no. 1, note, p.27) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8234] & The Keep [LIB/500218] & S.A.S. library

The Haslingbourne Navigation, by G. D. Johnston, published November 1964 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVI no. 4, note, pp.131-132) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8234] & The Keep [LIB/500218] & S.A.S. library

Iron Canal Bridge, by Gerard Young, published November 1964 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVI no. 4, note, p.134) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8234] & The Keep [LIB/500218] & S.A.S. library

London's Lost Route to the Sea, by P. A. L. Vine, published 1965 (London: David & Charles, Dawlish & Macdonald) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries
Review by G. D. J. [G. D. Johnston] in Sussex Notes and Queries, November 1965:
It gives great pleasure to read a book concerning Sussex which has clearly involved much research by the Author both in written records and on the ground and which carries assurance of its accuracy. Every inhabitant of Sussex (especially in the Rape of Arundel) should possess a copy. As may be surmised the book deals at length and mainly with finance and local conditions. Details of the original and later shareholders of the various companies (surprisingly few in number) and of the traffic carried and the opposition and support of landowners and traders, is fully and clearly set out and there are useful appendices of traffic returns, barge-owners and officials. So far as Sussex is concerned and apart from abortive schemes the Author deals with the Wey and Arun canal, the Arun Navigation and the Portsmouth and Arundel canal.

Dugout Canoes found in the River Arun, by K. Jane Evans, published November 1965 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVI no. 6, article, pp.184-187) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8234] & The Keep [LIB/500218] & S.A.S. library

Clements Bridge, by G. D. Johnston, published May 1966 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVI no. 7, article, pp.233-234) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8234] & The Keep [LIB/500218] & S.A.S. library

Ferries in Sussex, by G. D. Johnston, published May 1966 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVI no. 7, article, pp.237-244) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8234] & The Keep [LIB/500218] & S.A.S. library

Ferries in Sussex, continued, by G. D. Johnston, published November 1966 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVI no. 8, article, pp.277-279) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8234] & The Keep [LIB/500218] & S.A.S. library

Ferries in Sussex, continued, by G. D. Johnston, published May 1967 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVI no. 9, article, pp.305-311) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8234] & The Keep [LIB/500218] & S.A.S. library

Squitry Bridge, by G. D. Johnston, published May 1970 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVII no. 5, article, pp.161-163) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8235] & The Keep [LIB/500219] & S.A.S. library

Rife, by G. D. J. [G. D. Johnston], published May 1970 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVII no. 5, note, pp.169-170) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8235] & The Keep [LIB/500219] & S.A.S. library

Inscriptions on Sussex Bridges, by G. D. Johnston, published May 1971 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVII no. 7 and last, article, pp.209-233) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8235] & The Keep [LIB/500219] & S.A.S. library

Bulletin of the Wey & Arun Canal Society, May & Oct 1971, published 1972 (pamphlet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 5284]

The Royal Military Canal: an historical account of the waterway and military road from Shorncliffe in Kent to Cliff End in Sussex, by P. A. L. Vine, published 1972 (239 pp., Newton Abbot: David & Charles, ISBN-10: 0715355104 & ISBN-13: 9780715355107) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
The Royal Military Canal is the story of the building and operation of this canal during the century of its active life. It was designed to be the third line of defence against possible invasion by Napoleon and is one of only two canals in Britain to be built by the state, (the Royal Staff Corps). Construction began in October 1804 and the work was completed in April 1809. It was built in two sections and runs for 28 miles between Seabrook near Folkestone and Cliff End near Hastings. The Royal Military Canal covers not only the canal's construction but also much to interest the military historian. The early days of the Royal Staff Corps are covered as are the transport services of the Royal Wagon Train. Although the canal never saw military action there was an attempt to use it to control smuggling from Romney Marsh, however, this proved unsuccessful due in no small part to corrupt guards. The canal was finally abandoned in 1877 and is now an important environmental site.

The Evolution of Newhaven Harbour and the Lower Ouse before 1800, by John H. Farrant, published 1972 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 110, article, pp.44-60) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2195] & The Keep [LIB/500319] & S.A.S. library

Guide to the Use of Boats on Sussex Rivers, published 1973 (pamphlet, Sussex River Authority) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 12541]

Sussex River: Journeys along the Banks of the Ouse - Seaford to Newhaven, by Edna & 'Mac' McCarthy, published 1975 (Lindel Organisation Ltd.) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16046] & The Keep [LIB/500072] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Sediment Budget and Source in the Catchment of the River Rother, West Sussex. , by P. A. Wood, 1975 at King's College London (Ph.D. thesis)

Sussex River: Journeys along the Banks of the River Ouse - Newhaven to Lewes, by Edna & 'Mac' McCarthy, published 1977 (Lindel Organisation Ltd.) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/500073] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The Changing Structure of Land Ownership in the Lower Ouse valley, 1780 to 1880, by S. P. Farrant, published 1978 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 116, article, pp.261-268) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7197] & The Keep [LIB/500313] & S.A.S. library

Sussex River: Journeys along the Banks of the River Ouse - Upstream, from Lewes to the Sources, by Edna & 'Mac' McCarthy, published 1979 (Lindel Organisation Ltd.) accessible at: & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The management of four estates in the lower Ouse Valley, by S. Farrant, published 1979 in Southern History (vol. 1, article, pp.155-170)
Abstract:
The estates, with the families involved, are Stanmer (Chichester), Glynde (Brand), Southdown (Abergavenny) and Wiston (Goring)

The Cuckmere: Another Sussex River, by Edna & 'Mac' McCarthy, published 1 May 1981 (132 pp., Lindel Organisation Ltd., ISBN-10: 0950235466 & ISBN-13: 9780950235462) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

West Sussex Waterways, by P. A. L. Vine, published 9 November 1985 (96 pp., Midhurst: Middleton Press, ISBN-10: 090652024X & ISBN-13: 9780906520246) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 12550][Lib 9458] & East Sussex Libraries

Further Evidence for the Environmental Impact of Prehistoric Cultures in Sussex from Alluvial Fill Deposits in the Eastern Rother Valley, by Robert G. Scaife and P. J. Burrin, published 1987 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 125, article, pp.1-10) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9994] & The Keep [LIB/500304] & S.A.S. library

River Flow in Sussex, by Kevin Crisp and Tom Browne, published 1988 (Geographical educational material for schools - Sussex studies no. 6, pamphlet, 57 pp., Brighton: Manpower Services Commission) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 10038] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The Baybridge Canal, by Joan Ham, published January 1989 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 42, article, p.21) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/42] & The Keep [LIB/500482]

Lower Ouse Navigation, 1934-1967, by Alan F. Hill, published 1991 (published by the author) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/500070] & East Sussex Libraries

The Chichester Canal, by T. R. Turner, published 1991 (pamphlet, Chichester Canal Society) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 12618] & West Sussex Libraries

The Story of Restoring London's Lost Route to the Sea, by Wey & Arun Canal Trust, published 1993 (pamphlet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 13165]

Along the Arun, by John William Adamson and illustrated by Andrew Bucknall and Kate Wilson, published 5 September 1994 (109 pp., The Alexius Press Ltd., ISBN-10: 0951988611 & ISBN-13: 9780951988619) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 12820] & West Sussex Libraries

London's Lost Route to Midhurst: The Earl of Egremont's Navigation and the Building of the Petworth Canal, by P. A. L. Vine, published 29 June 1995 (160 pp., Stroud: Sutton Publishing Ltd., ISBN-10: 0750909684 & ISBN-13: 9780750909686) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

London's Lost Route to the Sea, by P. A. L. Vine, published 1 July 1996 (5th revised edition, 280 pp., Midhurst: Middleton Press, ISBN-10: 1873793782 & ISBN-13: 9781873793787) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14513][Lib 14514] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
The development of the Arun navigation as early as 1545 and the Wey a hundred years later, made a canal link between the London and Portsmouth an attractive commercial concept. Sponsored by the 3rd Earl of Egremont and opened in 1816, the canal's trade fell below expectations. The Portsmouth and Arun Canal, opened in 1823, did increase trade but the need for transhipment and cargoes restricted to 30 tons meant it was easier and more economical to use Channel coasters to London. Like the Basingstoke, trade relied on local developments and the Wey & Arun enjoyed a period of prosperity in the 1830s but, as with the Basingstoke, it suffered water shortages on the summit pound and competition from better roads and then railways so that it finally closed in 1871. This book is a full length detailed study, written with the interest of the general reader in mind, but fully documented for the historian. The Appendices are of special note. The book is profusely illustrated with 135 plates and line drawings, of which 90 are new to this edition, and 16 maps.

The Chichester Canal, published 1997 (booklet, Chichester Canal Society) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 13713]

Growth of Communications 1720-1840, by John Farrant, published 1 January 1999 in An Historical Atlas of Sussex (pp.78-79, Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd, ISBN-10: 1860771122 & ISBN-13: 9781860771125) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14026][Lib 18777] & The Keep [LIB/501686][LIB/508903] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Growth of Communications 1840-1914, by John Farrant, published 1 January 1999 in An Historical Atlas of Sussex (pp.80-81, Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd, ISBN-10: 1860771122 & ISBN-13: 9781860771125) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14026][Lib 18777] & The Keep [LIB/501686][LIB/508903] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The Wey & Arun Canal Trust, published 2000 (pamphlet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16580]

Port of Lewes in the 20th Century: Lower Ouse Navigation, by Alan F. Hill, published 2000 (published by the author) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/500075] & East Sussex Libraries

The Arun Navigation, by P. A. L. Vine, published 1 October 2000 (128 pp., NPI Media Group, ISBN-10: 0752421034 & ISBN-13: 9780752421032) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14655] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Hunston Canal Bridge, by A. H. J. Green, published 2001 in Sussex Industrial History (issue no. 31, article, pp.24-27, ISSN: 0263-5151) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/506529]   Download PDF
Abstract:
The flat coastal plain of the Selsey Peninsula offered little in the way of natural obstacles to the Engineer of the Hundred of Manhood and Selsey Tramway, the redoubtable Lieutenant-Colonel H.F. Stephens, Indeed the stage was set for a cheap and cheerful railway taking full advantage of the dispensations offered by the 1896 Light Railway Act.
There was, however, one man-made obstacle namely the Chichester Branch of the Portsmouth and Arundel Canal which required to be crossed in a manner which did not impede navigation. At the time of construction of the line (1897) the canal traffic was dwindling, having been creamed off by the LB&SCR which reached Chichester in 1846. However ocean-going barges were still sailing into the City's canal basin bringing timber to Covers who were the principal timber merchant in the area. As such there were no immediate plans for closure, so the Colonel was forced to come up with a design for a bridge which would permit the passage of fully-masted vessels. A fixed design would have entailed high approach embankments and considerable cost. As unnecessary expense was not a term in the Colonel's phrase-book he plumped for a movable structure. He would not have had to look far for inspiration for the LB&SCR had two movable railway bridges over navigable rivers in Sussex at Ford and Southerham but these would have been too conventional, not to say far too costly, for the Colonel.

The Lewes Flood, by Andy Thomas and foreward by Norman Baker, published 15 June 2001 (56 pp., Seaford: S. B. Publications, ISBN-10: 1857702360 & ISBN-13: 9781857702361) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502852] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The Great River of Lewes, by John Houghton, published 2002 (published by the author) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502851] & East Sussex Libraries

River Lavant Culvert: excavations in Market Road car park, St John's Street, Chichester, 1996, by Frances Raymond, published 2004 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 142, article, pp.45-61) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15489] & The Keep [LIB/500360] & S.A.S. library   View Online
Abstract:
Excavation revealed two large ditches on the same alignment as the city wall. One of these may have been the Roman inner town ditch, re-cut at a later date. The other is likely to have been the medieval ditch constructed in 1378. Substantial post-medieval foundations had been laid immediately above the tertiary silts within this feature. These may have been associated with an episode of landscaping, involving an attempt to control the floodwaters of the River Lavant. Additional features included an early Roman hearth, a cellar of medieval or later date, a post-medieval property boundary, and a 19th- or early 20th-century well and outbuilding. A possible relict river channel was also located on the line of the 19th-century culvert.

The History of Chichester's Canal, by Alan H. J. Green, published March 2005 (Sussex Industrial Archaeology Society, ISBN-10: 0951203614 & ISBN-13: 9780951203613) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Retired on the River, The Houseboats of Shoreham, by Philip Simons and Nick Hall, published 2006 (Small Craft Historical Research Group) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

Wey and Arun Junction Canal, by P. A. L. Vine, published 1 April 2007 (128 pp., Tempus Publishing Ltd., ISBN-10: 0752442708 & ISBN-13: 9780752442709) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Largely as a result of substantial investment by the 3rd Earl of Egremont, a keen patron of the arts and perhaps the richest man in Britain at the time, the Wey & Arun Junction Canal opened in 1816. To contemporary commentators, it seemed set for success as part of a new navigable route from London to Portsmouth and the Sussex coast. Sadly, though the countryside remained 'beautiful and picturesque', the canal, after fifty-five years of modest trading, fell victim to competition from railways and problems with its own water supply. The order for closure came in 1871, and for the best part of a century the Wey & Arun lay abandoned. The derelict state of the canal as it lingered forgotten and crumbling, as well as the attempts being made since 1970 to reinstate it, are vividly evoked here by illustrations from the author's collection and those of the Wey & Arun Canal Trust.

The Arun Navigation, by P. A. L. Vine, published 1 November 2007 (revised edition, 128 pp., The History Press, ISBN-10: 0752443232 & ISBN-13: 9780752443232) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
The Arun is the longest river in Sussex, running from St Leonards Forest to the English Channel and covering some thirty-seven miles. For many centuries the waterway assumed an important role as one of the main arteries of commerce in Sussex. In use since the Norman Conquest, it was improved by landowners in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with improvements at Palingham and canals built near Newbridge and Pulborough. In this section can be found the only tunnel in Britain to link two parts of a river navigation. The construction of the Wey and Arun Junction Canal in 1816 eventually linked the Arun with the Thames. Today the river is a haven for pleasure boaters. This updated and revised edition covers changes to the navigation over recent years and a selection of new illustrations.

Walking the Riversides of Sussex, by David Bathurst, published 25 February 2008 (160 pp., Seaford: S. B. Publications, ISBN-10: 1857703375 & ISBN-13: 9781857703375) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Sussex is blessed with many rivers, from the wide and imposing Arun and Ouse to the more modest and enchanting Lavant and Brede, each with their own distinctive character and surroundings. This book is the definitive guide to walking beside each of the named rivers of Sussex, with full route descriptions, public transport links and mapping for each walk. Packed with illustrations, this is the ideal guide for the riverside walker or the armchair traveller wishing to know more about the fascinating variety of rivers in Sussex.

The History of Chichester's Canal, by Alan H. J. Green, published 31 July 2009 (3rd extended edition, 100 pp., Sussex Industrial Archaeology Society, ISBN-10: 0951203622 & ISBN-13: 9780951203620) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

The Royal Military Canal: An Historical Account of the Waterway and Military Road from Shorncliffe in Kent to Cliff End in Sussex, by P. A. L. Vine, published 8 April 2010 (192 pp., Stroud: Amberley Publishing, ISBN-10: 1848684509 & ISBN-13: 9781848684508) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
The Royal Military Canal was one of only two waterways built in Great Britain by the Government. Together with the Martello towers it was designed as a defence against the threatened invasion of the Kent Coast by the Emperor Napoleon in 1805. The sixty-foot -wide waterway stretched 28 miles from beneath the cliff s at Sandgate and around Romney Marsh to Rye in Sussex. Here the Brede Navigation continued to Winchelsea and thence across Pett Level to Cliff End. After Nelson's victory at Trafalgar, the canal and military road was used for transporting troops by barge between Rye and Shorncliffe Camp. It was also opened up to commercial traffic. Between 1810 and 1867 the cost of maintenance was partially offset by the receipt of barge and waggon tolls which together with rents exceeded on average GBP1,200 a year. The book also deals with the proposed Weald of Kent Canal and gives a detailed account of the work of the Royal Staff Corps, who built the canal and of the transport services provided by the Royal Waggon Train. In 1877 the War Department leased part of the canal to the Lords of Romney Marsh and to the Corporation of the Hythe. In 1909 the last barge passed through Iden Lock. Nowadays the Environment Agency and Hythe Corporation have improved the canal's infrastructure by providing historic information about the waterway and its locality and by ensuring the good maintenance of facilities for anglers, pleasure boaters and walkers. This edition, first published 38 years ago, has been carefully revised. As well as new illustrations, included for the first time are plans showing the former location of the 15 station houses built to accommodate the canal's sentries. Military historians, canal enthusiasts and local residents will find the book of considerable interest.

The Arun Navigation and Hardham Canal Tunnel, by P. A. L. Vine, published 2011 in Sussex Industrial History (issue no. 41, article, pp.2-14, ISSN: 0263-5151) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16389/41] & The Keep [LIB/506538]   Download PDF
Abstract:
The River Arun has for centuries been the most important of the Sussex waterways. There seems little doubt that the river was partly navigable at the time of the Norman Conquest. While authorities are at variance upon whether Arundel boasted any river traffic before this date, the town is referred to as a port in Domesday Book time ('portum aquae et consuetudinem navium'). It is reported by various chroniclers that in about 1070, Roger de Montgomery, a Norman nobleman, created Earl of Arundel by William I for his help at Hastings, imported small square blocks of Caen stone from Normandy for refacing the castle keep. Hadrian Allcroft presents a strong case for accepting Ford as the then port of Arundel, since the tide probably flowed no higher than this point before 1300 and the crossing-point would have hindered the passage of boats which were heavily laden. Furthermore, the river would at that time have flowed an inconvenient half a mile east of where Arundel Bridge now stands.

The Canal Pumping Station at Ford, by Alan H. J. Green, published 2011 in Sussex Industrial History (issue no. 41, article, pp.24-32, ISSN: 0263-5151) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16389/41] & The Keep [LIB/506538]   Download PDF
Abstract:
The Portsmouth and Arundel Navigation (P&AN) was promoted to complete an inland waterway route from London to Portsmouth and authorised by Act of Parliament on 7 July 1817.1 The project included the construction of a canal from the River Arun at Ford to Chichester Harbour at Birdham, a distance of nearly 12 miles, which, together with a short branch to Chichester, formed its Sussex Line. The Engineer appointed for the project was the great John Rennie, then aged 56.

Along the Arun, by John Adamson, published 3 December 2014 (revised edition, 112 pp., The Alexius Press Ltd., ISBN-10: 0951988689 & ISBN-13: 9780951988688) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Twenty years after its first publication, Along the Arun has been republished in a fully revised edition with new photographs. The book provides a guide for walkers based on the course of the River Arun from Littlehampton to Pulbrough. While detailed information about the route is given, Along the Arun provides more than a conventional walkers' guide, for it has a wealth of information about towns and villages on the way and on the river itself. It has appeal, therefore, to visitors by car or public transport who do not wish to embark on ambitious walks and indeed to residents of the area wanting to know more about it. Even the armchair explorer will find much of interest. The area covered has beautiful scenery and much of historical interest. To do justice to the subject, the book ranges in time from the geological origins of the Arun and the evidence of early man in Sussex right up to the very contemporary East Beach Cafe in Littlehampton designed by Thomas Heatherwick, taking in Roman, Saxon, Norman and later phases of history along the way. The book includes thirteen maps and thirty-one photographs closely related to the text.

Romano-British Waterways, by Ann Best, published August 2016 in Sussex Past & Present (no. 139, article, p.7, ISSN: 1357-7417) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/507923] & S.A.S. library