Bibliography - Transport: Maritime and shipping
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Shipping and Coast Scenes and Antiquities of Sussex, by R. H. Nibbs, published 1876 (Brighton: Nibbs)

Ancient Boat Found at Bexhill, by Charles Dawson, published 1894 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 39, article, pp.161-163) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2124] & The Keep [LIB/500257] & S.A.S. library   View Online

The Capture of the Merchant Ship 'St. Paul', in Cuckmere Bay, Sussex, by Robert Garraway Rice, published 1899 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 42, article, pp.87-103) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2127] & The Keep [LIB/500260] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Sea Fight Off Winchelsea in 1350, by The Editor, published 1902 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 45, notes & queries, pp.217-218) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2130] & The Keep [LIB/500263] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Drake's Advice in 1587, by F. H. Arnold, F.S.A., published 1906 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 49, notes & queries, p.169) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2134] & The Keep [LIB/500267] & S.A.S. library   View Online

The Victoria History of the County of Sussex, edited by William Page, F.S.A., published 1907 (vol. 2: Ecclesiastical, Maritime, Social and Economic History, Population 1801-1901, Industries, Agriculture, Forestry, Architecture, Schools and Sport, xv + 481 pp. (facsimile edition published 1973), London: Victoria County History, ISBN-10: 0712905863 & ISBN-13: 9780712905862) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2399][Lib 9097] & The Keep [LIB/500090][Lib/504899] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries   View Online

The Ships and Mariners of Shoreham, by H. Cheal, published 1909 (F. M. Blake) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

The Channel Island service of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, by Alfred R. Bennett, published 1 September 1916 in Journal of the Institution of Locomotive Engineers (vol. 6, no. 9, article, pp.308-317)
From Newhaven, later from Littlehampton.

Old Sussex Seaport, a Brief History of Shoreham, by H. Cheal, published 1924 (published by the author) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

The Sussex Ships of the Cinque Ports Fleet in 1300 , by N. F. Ticehurst, published August 1926 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. I no. 3, note, pp.78-79) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8950] & The Keep [LIB/500203] & S.A.S. library

Seven Ships that sailed to Seaford Bay, by Arthur Beckett, published 1928 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. II no. 5, article, pp.204-208) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9327] & The Keep [LIB/500138]

Shipping at Newhaven, by J. Hutchings, published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 9, article, pp.745-752) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500173]

Seven Ships that sailed to Seaford Bay, by S.C.M. Contributor(s), published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 10, article, p.835) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500173]

English Trade in the Middle Ages, by L. F. Salzman, M.A., F.S.A., published 1931 (Oxford: The Clarendon Press) accessible at: & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Review by F. B. S. [F. Bentham Stevens] in Sussex Notes and Queries, August 1931:
This cannot be regarded as in any special sense a Sussex book, but its author, Mr. Salzman, has been so long and so prominently connected with the Sussex Archaeological Society and has rendered such conspicuous service as Honorary Editor of its Collections for more than twenty years, that a short notice will no doubt be welcome to many readers of S.N.Q.
Like Mr Salzman's previous works on English Life in the Middle Ages and English Industries of the Middle Ages, the book is full of interest both for the student and the general reader. It is packed from cover to cover with facts and apt examples, and is scholarly and learned without being in the least dull. No theories are propounded and no arguments are put forward, and it is clear that Mr. Salzman does not write to bolster up any preconceived ideas. But every now and then he permits himself a shrewd dig at some ancient or modern foible or some pretentious dogma.
Sussex sources are naturally quoted here and there. Thus we learn from a footnote on p.193 that in 1343 the rector of St. John-sub-Castro, Lewes, belonged to a gang of robbers. The references to the wool trade and the comparative figures given on p.224 and also on p.307 show that relatively speaking the wool trade of Sussex was not of great importance.
Perhaps most interesting of all to Sussex readers are the details as to the extent of maritime trade in the Middle Ages. Mr. Salzman has unearthed some returns relating to Winchelsea which set out the port dues collected from 1267 to 1272 (see pp.215-6 and 355). During the period ships came to Winchelsea from English ports such as Chichester, Shoreham, Dartmouth, Teignmouth, Yarmouth, and Dunwich; from French ports like Rouen, Harfleur, Dieppe, Treport, Eu, Abbeville, Boulogne and Calais; from Damme, Gravelines the Swyne and Middelburgh in the Low Countries; and even from Ardales, Fuenterrabia and San Sebastian in Spain. It is perhaps not too much to hope that Mr. Salzman will give Sussex readers further extracts from these Winchelsea records.

The Historic Tragedy of the 'Brazen', by F. W. Jackson, published 1934 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. VIII no. 1, article, pp.56-58) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9329] & The Keep [LIB/500177]

Sussex Wool Ports in the Thirteenth Century. I - Chichester, by R. A. Pelham, M.A., Ph. D., published November 1934 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. V no. 4, article, pp.101-103) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2204][Lib 8223][Lib 8862] & The Keep [LIB/500207] & S.A.S. library

The Barque 'Alastor', Last of the Sussex Sailing Ships, by M. Rome, published 1935 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IX no. 2, article, pp.106-107) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9330] & The Keep [LIB/500179]

The Life-Boats of Sussex: Some Thrilling Stories, by Sir Godfrey Baring, Bart., Chairman of the R.N.L.I., published 1935 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IX no. 6, article, pp.361-366) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9330] & The Keep [LIB/500179]

Sussex Wool Ports in the Thirteenth Century. 2 - Shoreham, by R. A. Pelham, M.A., Ph.D., published February 1935 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. V no. 5, article, pp.137-141) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2204][Lib 8223][Lib 8862] & The Keep [LIB/500207] & S.A.S. library

Sussex Wool Ports in the Thirteenth Century. 3 - Seaford, by R. A. Pelham, M.A., Ph.D., published May 1935 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. V no. 6, article, pp.166-171) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2204][Lib 8223][Lib 8862] & The Keep [LIB/500207] & S.A.S. library

Meeching Ferry and Stockferry, by Laurence F. Field, published May 1935 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. V no. 6, article, pp.171-174) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2204][Lib 8223][Lib 8862] & The Keep [LIB/500207] & S.A.S. library

The Exportation of Wool from Winchelsea and Pevensey in 1288-9, by R. A. Pelham, M.A., Ph.D., published August 1935 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. V no. 7, article, pp.205-206) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2204][Lib 8223][Lib 8862] & The Keep [LIB/500207] & S.A.S. library

Sussex Sailing Ships. 1 - The ships of R. H. Penney, Shoreham, by M. Rome, published 1936 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. X no. 1, article, pp.22-27) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2315][Lib 9331] & The Keep [LIB/500181]

Sussex Sailing Ships. 1 - The ships of R. H. Penney, Shoreham, continued, by M. Rome, published 1936 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. X no. 2, article, pp.116-118) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2315][Lib 9331] & The Keep [LIB/500181]

Sussex Sailing Ships. 2 - The "Bull Line" of Newhaven, by M. Rome, published 1936 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. X no. 3, article, pp.198-203) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2315][Lib 9331] & The Keep [LIB/500181]

Sussex Sailing Ships. 3 - The Last Two Ships built at Shoreham, by M. Rome, published 1936 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. X no. 4, article, pp.240-242) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2315][Lib 9331] & The Keep [LIB/500181]

Sussex Sailing Ships. 4 - The Loss of the Brig Galway Lass of Lewes, by M. Rome, published 1936 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. X no. 5, article, pp.313-325) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2315][Lib 9331] & The Keep [LIB/500181]

Sussex Sailing Ships. 5 - The Loss of the Barque Akbar, by M. Rome, published 1936 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. X no. 6, article, pp.385-386) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2315][Lib 9331] & The Keep [LIB/500181]

Sussex Sailing Ships. 6 - Some Sussex Shipwrecks, by M. Rome, published 1936 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. X no. 7, article, pp.469-472) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2315][Lib 9331] & The Keep [LIB/500181]

Sussex Sailing Ships. 7 - Ships of Rye, by M. Rome, published 1936 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. X no. 8, article, pp.540-543) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2315][Lib 9331] & The Keep [LIB/500181]

The Fishing Boats of Hastings, by James Hornell, F.L.S., F.R.A.I., published 1937 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. XI no. 11, article, pp.700-705; no. 12, pp.766-771) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2316][Lib 9332] & The Keep [LIB/500182]

The fishing luggers of Hastings: Part 1, by James Hornell, published 1938 in The Mariner's Mirror (24(3), article, pp.259-274)

The fishing luggers of Hastings: Part 2, by James Hornell, published 1938 in The Mariner's Mirror (24(4), article, pp.409-428)

A Famous Firm of Sussex Shipowners: The Story of the Robinsons of Littlehampton, by A. W. Robinson, published 1938 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. XII no. 1, article, pp.30-32; no. 2, pp.91-95) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2317] & The Keep [LIB/500183]

Cruising Around the Sussex Coast: Romantic Gateways into England, by Arthur Lamsley, published 1938 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. XII no. 4, article, pp.226-230; no. 5, pp.304-307; no. 6, pp.372-375) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2317] & The Keep [LIB/500183]

Sussex Porst in 1204, by W. B. [W. Budgen], published February 1941 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. VIII no. 5, note, pp.153-154) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8865][Lib 2207] & The Keep [LIB/500210] & S.A.S. library

The Ships of the Cinque Ports in 1586/7, by J. Manwaring Baines, curator of the Hastings Museum, published November 1952 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XIII nos. 11 & 12, article, pp.241-244) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8231] & The Keep [LIB/500215] & S.A.S. library

The Geographical Aspects of the Maritime Trade of Kent and Sussex, by J. H. Andrews, 1954 at London School of Economics (Ph.D. thesis)

The Trade and Ships of Brighton in the second half of the seventeenth century, by J. H. Andrews, published November 1954 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XIV nos. 3 & 4, article, pp.46-48) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8232][Lib 2213] & The Keep [LIB/500216] & S.A.S. library

Three Sussex ports, 1850-1950, by H.C. Brookfield, published 1955 in Journal of Transport History (vol. 2, no. 1, article, p.35)

Remains of two old vessels found at Rye, Sussex, by Captain H. Lovegrove, R.N. , published 1964 in The Mariner's Mirror (50(2), article, pp.115-122)

Ancient Boat at Eastbourne, by Richard Gilbert, published May 1964 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVI no. 3, article, pp.89-92) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8234] & The Keep [LIB/500218] & S.A.S. library

Rye Shipping Records, 1565-1590, edited by Richard F. Dell, published 1966 (vol. 64, Sussex Record Society) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8064][Lib 2280] & The Keep [LIB/506359][Lib/506616] & West Sussex Libraries
Review in Sussex Notes and Queries, November 1965:
The Sussex Record Society in its forthcoming volume breaks new ground in the field of local history. Who owned, built and financed the shipping of Elizabethan England upon which the maritime greatness of this country was based? What was the daily life of the men who manned the fleet in July, 1588, really like? Rye was an important member of the Cinque Ports and the main cross-channel port of the day. From its extensive records texts have been selected to illustrate every aspect of the maritime life of the community; building and fitting out, hiring and freighting, voyages and profits, conditions of service and the hazards of the mariner's calling from war, piracy and the sea itself. The part played by Rye in the fishing industry is also examined. Two groups of records printed are believed to be unique: the trading accounts of a small merchantman showing the profits of ship ownership as distinct from those of the merchants freighting the ship, and the records of the town's provision of a ship that served in the Channel against the Armada. A contemporary drawing of the variety of shipping in Rye harbour is included.
In addition to the select texts mentioned, the book contains a chronological analysis of shipping movements in the port compiled from the Exchequer Port Books and the parallel series of Local Customs Accounts surviving in the town's archives.
A full introduction to the customs system of Rye and the municipal control of maritime activity is provided, and notes throughout the volume indicate the existence of related documents not included in the text. A special study of ships owned by the town is included. There is a glossary and index.

Sussex Shipping Visiting the 'Liberty of the Water Thames' in 1760-1761, by J. Rudland Hearn, published May 1966 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVI no. 7, article, pp.231-233) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8234] & The Keep [LIB/500218] & S.A.S. library

Regional Sailing Guide: South Eastern England, by Percy W. Blandford, published 1 April 1971 (240 pp., Constable, ISBN-10: 0094574405 & ISBN-13: 9780094574403) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

Newhaven-Dieppe: from paddle to turbine - a story of the service and steamers, by Peter S. Bailey, published May 1972 (32 pp., Lindel Publishing Co., ISBN-10: 0950235407 & ISBN-13: 9780950235400) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

The Fishing Luggers of Hastings, by James Hornell, published 1974 (74 pp., London: National Maritime Museum) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502747] & East Sussex Libraries

Ship-owning at Newhaven in the later 19th century, by J. H. Farrant, published 1978 in Sussex Industrial History (No. 8, article, pp.17-23) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16389/8] & The Keep [LIB/506525]   Download PDF
Abstract:
Newhaven harbour, at the mouth of the River Ouse in East Sussex, has been best known for over a hundred years as a cross-Channel port with services operated by the English and French railway companies. But the harbour has always had other activities and this article looks at one of these, ship owning, in the later 19th century.
The records on which it is mainly based are the statutory register books for the Port of Newhaven, 1856-1913, which are kept at the Custom House. Comprehensive registration of British Shipping was introduced in 1786. Each vessel of British Ownership, British built, and of 15 or more tons was to be registered at 'the port to which she belongs' (i.e. where the vessel, her owner(s) and her master were best known - hence on being sold a vessel might be deleted from one Port's register and added to another); once registered the vessel and her owners acquired certain privileges. Registration was (and still is) effected by specified information, duly certified, being entered in the register book. The Merchant Shipping Act of 1854 led to a new format of register book being introduced, and such books are the earliest to survive at Newhaven. Books used under the 1786, 1824, and 1836 Acts have been lost, though it might be possible to reconstruct the greater part of the information in them for 1814 onwards from the transcripts which were sent to the Custom House in London and are now in the Public Record Office (classes BT 107, 108). Bare lists of vessels on the register in each year from 1786 may be found in class BT 162.

A Maritime History of Rye, by John A. Collard, published 1 November 1978 (153 pp., published by the author, ISBN-10: 0950627615 & ISBN-13: 9780950627618) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries

The Maritime Economy of Eastern Sussex 1550-1700, compiled by Colin Brent, published 1980 (27 leaves, East Sussex Record Office) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

Newhaven-Dieppe 1825-1980: the history of an Anglo-French joint venture, by B. M. E. O'Mahoney, published January 1980 (160 pp., published by the author, ISBN-10: 0950701106 & ISBN-13: 9780950701103) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

John Reeves - Master Mariner of the Port of Shoreham, by A. S. Parkes, published June 1980 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 4 no. 4, article, pp.121-124) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8672] & The Keep [LIB/501256] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
John Reeves was born in 1822 to John Reeves and Christiana Saunders in Southwick. He married Eliza Clements in 1847 at Findon and this article traces his seaman career until his death in 1866. Article covers the years 1819 - 1931 in the parish of Shoreham

The Ships and Mariners of Shoreham, by H. Cheal, published 1981 (reprint, 145 pp., G. E. & P. P. Bysh, ISBN-10: 095075711X & ISBN-13: 9780950757117) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7782][Lib 7970] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
This book by Henry Cheal, written in 1909, and now again in print for the first time in 72 years, explores some of the many ships built at Shoreham-by-Sea during a period when the ancient Sussex seaport had a flourishing shipbuilding industry. Information is given concerning the mariners and their ships, many of which set sail never to return. There are interesting chapters on the flight of King Charles II, smuggling to and from Shoreham, its pirates and the probable location is given of the submerged village of Pende.

From York River to Yorkshire Coast - The Life & Death of the Shoreham Ship 'Nelson', by A. S. Parkes, published September 1981 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 4 no. 9, article, pp.295-299) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8672] & The Keep [LIB/501256] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

"Any more for the 'Skylark'?!": Captain Fred Collins of Brighton - Part 1, by Robert B. Ettridge, published March 1982 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 5 no. 1, article, pp.17-26) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9174] & The Keep [LIB/501257] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

"Any more for the 'Skylark'?!": Captain Fred Collins of Brighton - Part 2, by Robert B. Ettridge, published June 1982 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 5 no. 2, article, pp.42-45) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9174] & The Keep [LIB/501257] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

A Sussex Man at Trafalgar - John Pilfold, by Phyl & Stanley Excell, published December 1982 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 5 no. 4, article, pp.116-120) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9174] & The Keep [LIB/501257] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

Coastal Forces Newhaven, by Frank Knowles, published December 1983 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 5 no. 8, article, pp.263-264) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9174] & The Keep [LIB/501257] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

Ships' Timbers, by Margaret Holt, published 1984 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 122, historical note, pp.224-225) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9140] & The Keep [LIB/500309] & S.A.S. library

The Harbours of Sussex as part of an Inland Transport System in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, by John H. Farrant, published 1985 in Sussex Industrial History (issue no. 15, article, pp.2-11) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16389/15] & The Keep [LIB/506525]   Download PDF
Abstract:
The stretch of coast within the bounds of the ancient county of Sussex has no intrinsic significance in transport history. Since the silting of Rye harbour in the seventeenth century, it has lacked a major natural harbour, for Chichester was and is accessible only to small craft. None of the harbours had more than a local hinterland (with one exception mentioned below): although the hinterlands cannot be defined with much precision, and varied over time and for different commodities, in general they probably did not reach beyond the limits of the county because of the proximity of Southampton to the west, London and the Medway to the north, and Dover to the east.
Furthermore, 'harbour' has to embrace any place frequented by shipping, whether or not graced by harbour works, because much cargo was landed from vessels run aground on the beach until the 1820s and continued to be at Hastings and in Chichester harbour until about 1880.

Sussex Shipwrecks, by Nicholas Thornton, published 1988 (128 pp., Berkshire: Countryside Books, ISBN-10: 0905392973 & ISBN-13: 9780905392974) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 10016] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Crew Members of Ships Trading from Newhaven, 1864-1889, published 1990 (booklet, PBN Publications) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 11114]
Listed by ship and by crew name

Where the River meets the Sea: One Hundred Years of the Sussex Yacht Club, by Dick Durham, published 1991 (148 pp., Sussex Yacht Club) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 13474] & West Sussex Libraries

A Brave Son of Sussex: Nicholas Levett 1816-1885, by Mrs. G. M. Couper, published March 1991 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 9 no. 5, article, pp.177-178) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 11999] & The Keep [LIB/501261] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Nicholas Levett was born in 1816 at Goring, the fourth son of Nicholas Levett and Sarah Stace who had married in 1806 at Seaford. Nicholas married Ruth Beale in 1844, and they had one daughter, Selina in St. Ives in 1857. Nicholas was coxswain of a lifeboat in St. Ives that rescued the crew of a French brig in heavy seas in1865. Article covers the years 1751 - 1981.

Tools of a brave existence: Beach fishing boats of Hastings, by Robin Gates, published 1992 in Classic Boat (no. 46, article, pp.27-32)

Shoreham's 'Dover' 1653-1730, by Ronald Clark and Dr. Ronald Freeman, published March 1993 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 10 no. 5, article, pp.184-186) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14877] & The Keep [LIB/501262] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The story of SS Dover built at Shoreham

The Murder That Never Was, by J. A. Beaden, published March 1993 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 10 no. 5, article, pp.195-198) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14877] & The Keep [LIB/501262] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The trial for the murder of Peter Bootes the commander of the Dutch hoy, De Dric Ge Susuetrs (The Three Sisters) in 1768.

A Note on West Sussex Shipping Records, by Marjorie Hothersall, published October 1993 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 52, article, p.7) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/52] & The Keep [LIB/500483]

Newhaven-Dieppe: the car ferry era, by Mike Cowsill and John Hendy, published 1994 (56 pp., Ferry Publications, ISBN-10: 1871947200 & ISBN-13: 9781871947205) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Fortification of the south coast: the Pevensey, Eastbourne and Newhaven defences 1750-1945 : towers, batteries, forts and fieldworks erected on this part of the south coast to resist an invasion, by John Edward Goodwin, published 1 December 1994 (142 pp., J. J. Publications, ISBN-10: 0952415801 & ISBN-13: 9780952415800) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Catching Stories: Voices from the Brighton Fishing Community, by Brighton Fishing Community Project Team, published 1 May 1996 (144 pp., Brighton: QueenSpark Books, ISBN-10: 0904733467 & ISBN-13: 9780904733464) accessible at: The Keep archive of QueenSpark Books & West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
This comprehensive account of the fishing industry documents how it has changed since the beginning of the century. At that time, fishing boats landed on the beach and the fish market was actually on the seafront. On a more personal level, Catching Stories is a living record, told in their own words, of the individuals who made up Brighton's fishing community.
Their past is remembered with humour and honesty, as are the bygone traditions and lifestyles of their families. This unique and valuable document of social and oral history reveals the details of a traditional profession in an informative and enjoyable way. Listen to 'hidden voices' that clamour to be heard!

Brighton Fishermen in 1864, by R. C. Grant, published December 1996 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 12 no. 4, article, p.137) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14879] & The Keep [LIB/508811] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
A list of 43 local seafaring men listed under the title: A Group of Tee-total Seamen, Fishermen & Boatmen of Brighton and its Vicinity, Members of the Philanthropic Society

Maritime Sussex, by David Harries, published 1 August 1997 (136 pp., Seaford: S. B. Publications, ISBN-10: 1857701224 & ISBN-13: 9781857701227) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
A 128 page paperback which traces the development of the ports and seaborne trade of coastal Sussex as well as its shipbuilding and fishing industries. It is illustrated by numerous black and white pictures

"Lamentable Intelligence from the Admiralty", by Chris Thomas, published September 1997 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 12 no. 7, article, pp.245-246) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14879] & The Keep [LIB/508814] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The story behind the collision of HMS Warrior and HMS Iron Duke in 1875

The maritime economy of Rye, 1560-1640, by Stephen Hipkin, published 1998 in Southern History (vol. 20/21, article, pp.108-142)

The development of the Arun District Council coastal monitor station at Littlehampton, West Sussex, by R. Spencer and M. Rawlinson, published March 1998 in Oceanography (article, pp.47-58) accessible at: British Library

West Sussex Shipping Records: the brig 'Breeze', by Richard Burgess, published April 1998 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 61, article, p.6) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/61] & The Keep [LIB/500485]

Growth of Communications 1720-1840, by John Farrant, published 1 January 1999 in An Historical Atlas of Sussex (pp.78-79, Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd, ISBN-10: 1860771122 & ISBN-13: 9781860771125) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14026][Lib 18777] & The Keep [LIB/501686][LIB/508903] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Growth of Communications 1840-1914, by John Farrant, published 1 January 1999 in An Historical Atlas of Sussex (pp.80-81, Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd, ISBN-10: 1860771122 & ISBN-13: 9781860771125) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14026][Lib 18777] & The Keep [LIB/501686][LIB/508903] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Seventh September 1870 - 8.00pm, by Mrs. Margaret T. Fosker, published September 2000 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 14 no. 3, article, p.93) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14881] & The Keep [LIB/508823] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Edmund Powell off East Lavant was a Warrant Officer on board HMS Captain which was lost at sea on 7th September 1870 off Cape Finisterre

An Interesting and Helpful Will, by Joan Jeffrey, published December 2000 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 14 no. 4, article, pp.129-130) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14881] & The Keep [LIB/508823] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
George Martlew was born in Oving in 1843, the son Mark and Eliza Martlew, and married Eliza Bridger in Portsea in 1868.  They had two sons and after Eliza's death in 1898 he married Florence Griffiths in 1899 in Wales.  This article describes his service in the Royal Navy from 1860 until 1899.

A Sussex Seaman, by R. L. Brown, published December 2000 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 14 no. 4, article, p.139) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14881] & The Keep [LIB/508823] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
George Wood (1823-1874) married Martha Jane Staves (1833- ) and had six children.  George served in the Royal Navy and when pensioned out of service became landlord of the 'Star' Inn at Playden.

The beach-launched fleet of Hastings, by Roger Michael Johnson, published 2001 in Maritime life and traditions (no. 10, article, pp.2-17)

Awards for a Heroic Crew, by K. R. Sommerford, published March 2001 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 14 no. 5, article, pp.172-173) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14881] & The Keep [LIB/508823] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
R.N.L.I. awards for heroism at Shoreham. 1. Acting Coxswain James T. Upperton and Henry Philcox on 16 November 1941 when 21 men were rescued. 2. Coxwain James Upperton on 8 August 1948 when 6 people were rescued

Memories of a Shoreham seafaring family, by Maria Butler, published 2002 (Roger Bateman) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

The Story of the Cross-Channel Ferry Service: Newhaven-Dieppe Service, 1847-2001, by Peter Bailey, published 4 January 2002 (186 pp., Editions Bertout, ISBN-10: 2867434475 & ISBN-13: 9782867434471) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

East Sussex Shipwrecks of the 19th Century (Pevensey, Hastings, Rye), by David Renno, published 14 August 2002 (ix + 288 pp., Book Guild Publishing Ltd., ISBN-10: 1857766474 & ISBN-13: 9781857766479) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Beachy Head shipwrecks of the 19th century : (Pevensey - Eastbourne - Newhaven), by David Renno, published 8 April 2004 (511 pp., Amherstt Media, ISBN-10: 1903637201 & ISBN-13: 9781903637203) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The 'Creteships': Concrete Shipbuilding at Shoreham 1918-20, by N. Kelly, published 2005 in Sussex Industrial History (issue no. 35, article, pp.20-27, ISSN: 0263-5151) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/506533]   Download PDF
Abstract:
By the end of the nineteenth century shipbuilding at Shoreham in West Sussex had declined to the point of extinction, leaving only a residual yacht and boat building industry; it appeared at that time very unlikely that substantial shipbuilding would ever resume at the port.
However, due to the extreme situation brought about by the First World War shipbuilding, operations at Shoreham were to enjoy a brief, if somewhat unusual, revival between 1918 and 1920.

Guide to the Wreck Site of the 'Amsterdam' 1749 at Hastings, by Peter Marsden, published 1 July 2007 (34 pp., Hastings Borough Council, ISBN-10: 0901536091 & ISBN-13: 9780901536099) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries

The Pleasure Boatmen of Eastbourne, by Ted Hide, published 30 November 2007 (192 pp., Seaford: S. B. Publications, ISBN-10: 1857703332 & ISBN-13: 9781857703337) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Over two hundred years of serving Eastbourne in its rise to become a premier seaside resort, the Pleasure Boatmen of this town were a special breed of seafarers with a skill in the ways of the sea and an inbred knowledge of tides and currents. Mainly drawn from the local fishing community, generations of families were involved in this once popular seaside occupation.
Serving visitors and resident alike with trips to Beachy Head and sea cruises they forged a history pf pleasure Boating from rowing skiffs, sailing, motor boats and not forgetting the bathing machine. Sadly the old ways are all gone from Eastbourne's seafront with the exception of the Allchorn Boating firm.
This book is the record of all the families, individuals and boats involved over the years.
The author lives in Eastbourne with his family and was once part of the Boating community.

Hastings, St Leonards and Eastbourne Steamship Co. Ltd, by David Renno, published December 2008 (75 pp., published by the author, ISBN-10: 0956866905 & ISBN-13: 9780956866905) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries

Fishermen of Eastbourne, by Ted Hide, published 20 November 2009 (388 pp., Seaford: S. B. Publications, ISBN-10: 1857703529 & ISBN-13: 9781857703528) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
In his second book, Ted Hide, explores in great detail the fishermen of Eastbourne, the families, the boats, the disasters, the successes, all in historical and nostalgic perfection.
Of resolute stock, Sussex fishermen were said by FE Sawyer in 1882 to be a mixed race, partly Spanish partly Norman French and partly Teutonic (Saxon) in origin. The 'Willicks' or 'Willickers' as the Fishermen of Eastbourne were known of old would fish the herring, sprat and mackerel when in those early days they came round in their seasons from the North. In their sturdy fine built sailing luggers known as 'Bourners' along with the fishing fleets of Hastings and Brighton following and fishing the mackerel down Channel to the west off Devon and Cornwall, finally to the waters off Southern Ireland, being away for months during the season. Other fishing expeditions would take our Eastbourne Luggers to northern waters off Scarborough. This close-knit community possessed skills and knowledge in the ways of the sea acquired over many generations of hardship with a mixture of bravery and tragedy both at sea and ashore. From the ancient fishing quarter, 'The Stade' at the 'Sea Houses', to the forced removal to east of the Great Redoubt, their current Fishing Station home. This book records happenings over the centuries of local fishing families and their important place in the life of Eastbourne. Not to be forgotten are interesting tales of piracy, smuggling and heroism aboard the Lifeboat.

Shipbuilding at West Itchenor, by Philip McDougall, published 2010 in Sussex Industrial History (issue no. 40, article, pp.7-10, ISSN: 0263-5151) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/506537]   Download PDF
Abstract:
During the eighteenth and the early years of the nineteenth century, the small waterside village of West Itchenor acquired some importance as a shipbuilding centre. The work of shipbuilding was not a constant process, the village having developed a particular niche in the construction of warships during periods of conflict. It was at such times that the government's own dockyards were so overburdened that new construction work was contracted out to merchants in possession of suitable facilities.

A pinch of salt with your greens?, by Reg Green, published March 2010 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 19 no. 1, article, pp.20-22) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15860] & The Keep [LIB/508842] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
My grandfather gave a large brass telescope to my father and told him that it was the one he had used when he was captain of a ship in the navy. My father later gave it to me with the same information as his father had given him. I have in my turn handed it on to my son, for his safekeeping. I was also told that "he had sailed the China seas".
A letter in 2005 to the Naval Historical Branch its Portsmouth brought an acknowledgement of my letter and that the best way of proceeding was to make a search of Ships Musters and pay books relating to Harry GREEN at the National Archives at Kew as their records in Portsmouth had been lost or damaged by enemy action during the war.

Shipwrecks of Sussex, by Wendy Hughes, published 1 June 2011 (160 pp., The Histroy Press, ISBN-10: 0752460102 & ISBN-13: 9780752460109) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Exploring the shipwrecks of the Sussex coast, from the 1600s to the present day
Review by Ed Jarzembowski in Sussex Past & Present no. 125, December 2011:
Disaster at sea has an enduring appeal. Writing a history book on shipwrecks on and off the Sussex coast is, however, a daunting task because there are so many, as highlighted here. A selection is inevitable, and the author has accomplished this in ten comparatively short, racy and readable chapters. Accounts of older shipwrecks are hampered by a shortage of documentary records and the Nympha Americana's 1747 mercury cargo is about as near as we get to sunken treasure. This is the first time I have read, however, about the loss of the Ptolemanus (1797) and the Tidemills Temptress (page 45), but am still left wondering if vessels were once deliberately lured onto the Sussex coast by the locals.
The bulk of the book deals with diverse wrecks and strandings from the 19th and 20th centuries. In many cases, recorded people can be linked with events and artefacts on what are, after all, time capsules. Shipwrecks have even inspired street names, although I am surprised at the omission of Woodward Close, Eastbourne, surely commemorating a musician on the Titanic (1912). There are some unexpected legacies, like the painted ivory nuts from the Peruvian (1899), and I must try the beer using yeast from an unnamed Littlehampton wreck.
In the background are significant changes in contemporary trade, technology and society. There are some typos (e.g. picture caption page 75) but I love the image of an iron steamship being reduced to matchwood (page 66). This is a perfect read in the middle of winter when it is dark and gusty outside, but unlike my wife Brigid, I hope I never hear the unforgettable thumping of a grounded sailing ship (Eendracht, 1998, page 94).

The Wreck of the Fairfax: A fifth foreshore wreck below the Seven Sisters, by E & B Jarzembowski, published April 2012 in Sussex Past & Present (no. 126, article, p.8, ISSN: 1357-7417) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/500475] & S.A.S. library   View Online
Preview:
At 6am on Thursday 10th February 1881, a leaking, three-masted steam screw ship called the Fairfax ploughed across the flint and chalk platform near the then Crowlink coastguard station. Made of iron and weighing 930 tons, she slid to a halt with the bowsprit just yards from the cliff face. Fortunately, the tide was falling and help was at hand from the nearby station. All aboard were rescued without serious injury, despite a perilous assembly on a chalk boulder. The shipwreck briefly became an Eastbourne tourist attraction before being sold off at auction on the 18th February. After the March inquest in London (maritime procedures moved fast then), the Fairfax was all but forgotten - until a rusty rib was spotted on an equinoctial tide in 2007, during an unsuccessful hunt for fossil reptiles.

Sea, Ships and Smugglers; Extracts from 19th Century newspapers; Studies in the history of Felpham and Middleton no. 3, published 1 November 2012 (52 pp., Felpham and Middleton Local History Workshop, ISBN-10: 095164825X & ISBN-13: 9780951648254) accessible at: Felpham and Middleton Local History Workshop & West Sussex Libraries

CL:BR - the Classis Britannica in Kent & Sussex, by Dana S. Adler, published 12 December 2013 (202 pp., Lulu.com, ISBN-10: 1291485015 & ISBN-13: 9781291485011) accessible at: British Library
Abstract:
A study of the Classis Britannica, Rome's British Channel Fleet, which existed for around 200 years, but which left very little evidence of its passing. This book concentrates on researching the evidence for the Fleet's forts and harbours in the English counties of Kent and Sussex, the only places where the Fleet's stamped tiles have been found.

By Steamer to the South Coast, by Andrew Gladwell, published 28 August 2014 (96 pp., Stroud: Amberley Publishing, ISBN-10: 1445614510 & ISBN-13: 9781445614519) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Since the dawn of steam navigation, people have taken pleasure cruises in Britain's rivers and estuaries and along the coast. Andrew Gladwell takes us on a tour of the south coast of England, illustrating the story of the paddle and pleasure steamers from south Devon to Sussex. Southampton and Bournemouth were the homes of the Red Funnel fleet, and Weymouth housed the ships of Cosens. Interlopers such as the White Funnel ships of P&A Campbell also operated in the area, as did independents in Brighton and Hastings. From the beauty of Lulworth Cove, where the paddlers would beach on the shallow sand to let passengers off, to the piers of Swanage, Poole, Bournemouth, the Isle of Wight, Southampton, Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings, pleasure steamers were a common sight until the late 1960s, when Cosens finally closed and scrapped their ships, although the PS Waverley and the Balmoral still continue the tradition.

New Maritime Exhibition: Collection of ship portraiture on display at Marlipins Museum, by Emma O'Connor, published August 2014 in Sussex Past & Present (no. 133, article, p.8, ISSN: 1357-7417) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/507923] & S.A.S. library   View Online

1864-1889 Newhaven Ships' Crews, published (no date) by PBN Publications (Ref: PBN96, CD-ROM)