Bibliography - Law: Crime and punishment
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Note: Prisons, Quarter Sessions, Smuggling, and Swing Riots are listed separately

Publications

A Genuine History of the inhuman and Unparalleled Murders of Mr. William Galley, a custom-house officer, and Mr. Daniel Chater, a shoemaker, by Fourteen Notorious Smugglers, with the trials and execution of seven of the criminals at Chichester, 1748-9, by A Gentleman of Chichester, published c.1749 (Brighton: W. J. Smith) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 3240] & East Sussex Libraries

Trial of Captain John Ellman of the Centre Sussex Battalion of Local Militia, by general court martial. Held at the Castle Tavern, Brighton, on Thursday, October the 2d. 1810 … on charges preferred against him by Lieutenant-Col. Graham, by Captain John Ellman, published 1810 (52 pp., Brighton: F.W. Lee) accessible at: British Library

A narrative of the conduct and adventures of Henry Frederic Moon, alias Henry Frederic More Smith, alias William Newman, a native of Brighthelmstone, Sussex, and now under sentence of imprisonment in Connecticut, North America? , by Walter Bates, published 1817 (84 pp., London: Allman & Co.)   View Online

Cinque-Port Law in 1742, by Samuel Evershed [probably], published 1866 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 18, notes & queries, pp.188-189) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2103] & The Keep [LIB/500237] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Briefs, by Rev. Edward Turner, published 1869 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 21, article, pp.207-217) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2016] & The Keep [LIB/500239] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Briefs, by Edward Turner, published 1870 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 22, notes & queries, p.230) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2017] & The Keep [LIB/500240] & S.A.S. library   View Online

A Genuine History of the inhuman and Unparalleled Murders of Mr. William Galley, a custom-house officer, and Mr. Daniel Chater, a shoemaker, by Fourteen Notorious Smugglers, with the trials and execution of seven of the criminals at Chichester, 1748-9, by A Gentleman of Chichester, published c.1872 (pamphlet, Brighton: W. J. Smith) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 46][Lib 12392][Lib 12770] & The Keep [LIB/502130] & East Sussex Libraries   View Online
First published in 1749. This edition also includes a reprint of an article from SAS Vol X 1858 (Smuggling in Sussex by William Durrant Cooper); an extract from an article in SAS Vol IX 1857 (Extracts from the Journal of Walter Gale p194-195) and an extract from an article in SAS Vol XX1V 1872 (Newspaper Cuttings Relating to Sussex p140-142). Some newspaper cuttings relating to smuggling and inns in Rowlands Castle, Rake and Slindon have been stuck inside the book, probably by Mervyn Cutten.

The Brighton Murder, edited by Charles Hindley, published 1875 (Brighton) accessible at: British Library
Abstract:
An authentic and faithful history of the atrocious murder of C. Holloway, … including, also, the trial for the murder and the … confessions of J. W. Holloway, together with his life and execution; also, the leading features of the trial of A. Kennett, his paramour. Embellished with engravings.

Sussex: Table of Fees to be Taken by the Clerk of the Peace, published 1880 accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 4392]

The Life and trial of Percy Lefroy, charged with the Brighton railway murder: the judge's summing-up, verdict, and sentence, published 1881 (16 pp., London: G. Purkess) accessible at: British Library
Concerns the murder of Frederick Isaac Gold

The King's Peace: a Historical Sketch of the English Law courts, by Frederick A. Inderwick, published 1895 (London: Swan Sonnenschein & Co. Ltd.)   View Online

Cuckfield Briefs, by Rev. Canon J. H. Cooper, Vicar of Cuckfield, published 1909 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 52, article, pp.24-31) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2137] & The Keep [LIB/500270] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Instructions for the West Sussex Constabulary, compiled by Captain Edward S. Godman, published 1914 (F. J. Parsons) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 770] & West Sussex Libraries

"Catnachery" in Sussex: Bad Ballads of Forgotten Crimes, by Arthur Beckett, published 1927 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. I no. 3, article, pp.106-113) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2303][Lib 8326] & The Keep [LIB/500137]

A Forfeiture Deodand, by W. B. [W. Budgen], published November 1927 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. I no. 8, note, pp.255-256) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8950] & The Keep [LIB/500203] & S.A.S. library

The trial of Patrick Mahon, published 1928 (286 pp., London: Geoffrey Bles) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

A West Sussex "Lamentable Complaint", by S.N.Q. contributor, published August 1928 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. II no. 3, note, pp.83-85) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8951] & The Keep [LIB/500204] & S.A.S. library

The Trial of Norman Thorne. The Crowborough Chicken Farm Murder, edited by Helena Normanton, published 1929 (367 pp., London: Geoffrey Bles) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries

Some Sussex Law Suits of the Past, by P. D. Mundy, published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 9, article, pp.760-761) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500173]

Mediaeval Witnesses, by L. F. Salzman, published November 1934 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. V no. 4, note, p.120) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2204][Lib 8223][Lib 8862] & The Keep [LIB/500207] & S.A.S. library

The Portslade shop murder, by W.E. Britton, published 1935 in Police Journal (vol. 8, no.1, article, pp.53-73)
The victim was Joseph Bedford, an ironmonger on Clarence Street at junction with North Street.

Sussex Briefs , by Laurence F. Field, published May 1936 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. VI no. 2, article, pp.48-49) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 12537][Lib 8863][Lib 8224] & The Keep [LIB/500208] & S.A.S. library

An Inquest at Rye in 1581, by Leopold A. Vidler, published February 1939 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. VII no. 5, article, pp.139-145) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 12536][Lib 8864][Lib 2206] & The Keep [LIB/500209] & S.A.S. library

An Inquest at Rye in 1581, by Leopold A. Vidler, published May 1939 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. VII no. 6, article, pp.177-181) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 12536][Lib 8864][Lib 2206] & The Keep [LIB/500209] & S.A.S. library

A Pardon for Homicide, by W. B. [W. Budgen], published February 1941 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. VIII no. 5, note, p.153) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8865][Lib 2207] & The Keep [LIB/500210] & S.A.S. library

How a person is outlawed, by W. B. [W. Budgen], published May 1941 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. VIII no. 6, note, p.179) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8865][Lib 2207] & The Keep [LIB/500210] & S.A.S. library

A Pardon for Duelling, by W. Budgen, F.S.A., published November 1941 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. VIII no. 8, article, pp.215-217) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8865][Lib 2207] & The Keep [LIB/500210] & S.A.S. library

Chichester Non-Jurors, by W. D. Peckham, published February 1943 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. IX no. 5, article, pp.115-116) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8227][Lib 2208] & The Keep [LIB/500211] & S.A.S. library

The Murder of Allen Grebell, by L. A. Vidler, published August 1946 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XI no. 3, article, pp.49-51) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8229][Lib 2210] & The Keep [LIB/500213] & S.A.S. library

West Sussex Deeds: Extracted from Calendar "C", published 1948 (Sussex Archaeological Trust) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 3517]

John George Haigh: acid bath killer, by Gerald Byrne, published 1950 (143 pp., London: Headline) accessible at: British Library

East and West Sussex, by G. D. J. [G. D. Johnston], published August 1950 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XIII no. 3, note, pp.67-68) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8231] & The Keep [LIB/500215] & S.A.S. library

Sussex' Lost Recorders [of Chichester and Rye], by S.N.Q. Contributor, published November 1950 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XIII no. 4, article, pp.80-83) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8231] & The Keep [LIB/500215] & S.A.S. library

Clerks of the Peace, 1594-1950, compiled by B. Campbell Cooke with a foreward by Sir Roland Burrows, K.C., LL.D., published August 1951 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XIII no. 7, article, pp.145-153) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8231] & The Keep [LIB/500215] & S.A.S. library

Sussex' Lost Recorders [of Chichester and Rye], by G. D. J. [G. D. Johnston], published November 1951 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XIII no. 8, note, pp.186-187) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8231] & The Keep [LIB/500215] & S.A.S. library

Clerks of the Peace for Sussex, 1594-1950, compiled by B. Campbell Cooke, published c.1952 (pamphlet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 4555][Lib 4718] & The Keep [LIB/503918]

The trial of John George Haigh: the acid bath murder, edited by Lord Dunboyne, published 1953 (271 pp., London: William Hodge) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

John George Haigh, by Stanley Jackson, published 1953 (127 pp., London: Odhams) accessible at: British Library

Mediaeval Diplomatic, by R. F. Hunnisett, published May 1955 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XIV nos. 5 & 6, article, pp.95-98) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8232][Lib 2213] & The Keep [LIB/500216] & S.A.S. library

Treason By Words, by R. F. Hunnisett, published November 1955 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XIV nos. 7 & 8, article, pp.116-120) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8232][Lib 2213] & The Keep [LIB/500216] & S.A.S. library

Murderer's moon: being studies of Heath, High, Christie and Chesney, by Conrad Phillips, published 1956 (238 pp., London: Arthur Barker) accessible at: British Library

The West Sussex Constabulary, 1857-1957, published 1957 (pamphlet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 4500]

The West Sussex Constabulary, 1857-1957, by Ronald Wilson, published 1957 (pamphlet, 28 pp., Southern Publishing) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 4500]

Intestate Administrations, 1559, by W. D. Peckham, published May 1957 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XIV nos. 13 & 14, article, pp.235-236) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8232][Lib 2213] & The Keep [LIB/500216] & S.A.S. library

The best we can do: an account of the trial of John Bodkin Adams, by Sybille Bedford, published 1958 (254 pp., London: Collins) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Murder with a difference: studies of Haigh and Christie, by Molly Lefebure, published 1958 (251 pp., London: Heinemann) accessible at: British Library

The Hastings disturbances, by D.L. Brown, published 1 January 1965 in Police Journal (vol. 38, no. 1, article, pp.5-13)
Fights between Mods and Rockers and how they were dealt with by the police.

Review of the West Sussex Constabulary by the Duke of Norfolk, published 1967 (pamphlet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 4502]

Review of the West Sussex Constabulary by the Duke of Norfolk, published 1967 (pamphlet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 4502]

The Crawley Juvenile Research Project, by Joy Mott, published 1968 in British Journal of Criminology, Delinquency and Deviant Social Behaviour (vol. 8, no. 1, article, p.50)

Captain Swing, by E. J. Hobsbawm and George Rud&eacuute;, published 1969 (384 pp., London: Lawrence and Wishart) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502124] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

East Grinstead Assizes, by R. F. Hunnisett, published November 1969 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVII no. 4, reply, p.129) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8235] & The Keep [LIB/500219] & S.A.S. library

East Grinstead Assizes, by I. D. Margary, published November 1969 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVII no. 4, reply, p.129) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8235] & The Keep [LIB/500219] & S.A.S. library

East Grinstead Assizes, by M. J. Leppard, published November 1969 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVII no. 4, reply, pp.130-131) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8235] & The Keep [LIB/500219] & S.A.S. library

Haigh: the mind of a murderer, by Arthur J. La Bern, published 1973 (187 pp., London: W.H. Allen) accessible at: British Library

Deposition Books of the Ecclesiastical Courts: An Unusual Genealogical Source, by W. K. Ford, published September 1973 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 1 no. 2, article, pp.28-30) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7965] & The Keep [LIB/501253] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

The History of Law and Law Enforcement in Horsham, 1306-1973, by Sussex Police, published c.1975 (pamphlet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 12831]

Calendar of Assize Records: Sussex Indictments, James I, edited by J. S. Cockburn, published 1975 (220 pp., Stationery Office Books, ISBN-10: 011440075X & ISBN-13: 9780114400750) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

Dissenters' Indictments, 1624-27, 1681, by Michael J. Burchall, published March 1975 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 1 no. 8, article, pp.244-249) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7965] & The Keep [LIB/501253] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
A list of people who had not attended church for three successive Sundays. Article covers the years 1624 - 1681 in the parishes of Chichester, Lewes, and Arundel

Calendar of Assize Records, Elizabeth I, Sussex., edited by J. S. Cockburn, published October 1975 (587 pp., Stationery Office Books, ISBN-10: 0114400571 & ISBN-13: 9780114400576) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15462] & The Keep [LIB/502140][Lib/502141] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Estate Duty and the Genealogist, by Francis Leeson, published September 1976 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 2 no. 6, article, pp.192-193) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7966] & The Keep [LIB/501254] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

Poaching and the game laws in East Sussex, 1830-1880, by S. Allen, 1979 at Sussex University (M.A. thesis)

The Hastings Gaoler's Murder, by Michael J. Burchall, published June 1979 in Sussex Genealogist and Family Historian (vol. 1 no. 1, article, pp.10-17) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 17603] & The Keep [LIB/501187] & CD SXGS from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The story of John Murdock otherwise known as Joseph Williams

Swing Riots in West Sussex 1830-31, by Peter Brickley, published September 1980 in Sussex Genealogist and Family Historian (vol. 2 no. 2, article, pp.53-62) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8671] & The Keep [LIB/501188] & CD SXGS from S.F.H.G.

Staffurth & Bray, 1882-1982: the Centenary of a Sussex Practice [solicitors], by Peter Glover and Graham Jackson, published 1982 (published by the firm) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8540] & West Sussex Libraries

The Common Peace: Legal structure and legal substance in East Sussex, 1594-1640, by Cynthia B. Herrup, 1982 at Northwestern University, Illinois (Ph.D. thesis)

Where there's a will: the sensational life of Dr John Bodkin Adams, by Rodney Hallworth and Mark Williams, published 1983 (246 pp., Jersey: Capstan Press, ISBN-10: 0946797005 & ISBN-13: 9780946797004) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Brighton College v. Marriott: Schools, charity law and taxation, by Martin D.W. Jones, published 1983 in History of Education (vol. 12, no. 2, article, pp.121-132)

R v Walson: New Light on a Medieval Mugging, by Christopher Whittick, published 1983 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 121, historical note, pp.213-215) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8902] & The Keep [LIB/500308] & S.A.S. library

My great-uncle is accused of stealing a sheep's head, by John Bishop, published January 1984 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 27, article, p.6) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/27] & The Keep [LIB/500480]

Climping versus Cudlow: A 14th Century Legal Battle, by George Harper, published May 1984 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 28, article, p.20) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/28] & The Keep [LIB/500481]

New Shoes and Mutton Pies: Investigative Responses to Theft in Seventeenth-Century East Sussex, by Cynthia Herrup, published December 1984 in The Historical Journal (vol. 27, no. 4, article, p.811, ISSN: 0018-246X)   View Online
Abstract:
On May Day 1639, Christopher Deering discovered that a lamb was missing from his property in Heathfield, East Sussex. The most accessible criminal court to try such a theft was the quarter sessions, which met approximately two months later. By the court date, Robert Walcott, a local labourer, had confessed to the felony. In court, Walcott again acknowledged his complicity. Pleading benefit of clergy, he asked the justices to spare his life. Walcott read a biblical text well enough to pass the traditional - although long outdated - literacy test of clerical status. He was branded in the thumb to mark him as an excused felon, and dismissed from public custody.

Easing the passing: the trial of Dr John Bodkin Adams, by Patrick Devlin, published 1985 (256 pp., London: Bodley Head, ISBN-13: 9780370306278) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries

Reported Crime in Georgian Brighton c.1760-1795, by Sue Farrant, published March 1985 in Sussex Genealogist and Family Historian (vol. 6 no. 4, article, pp.148-150) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [MP 6277] & The Keep [LIB/501192] & CD SXGS from S.F.H.G.

The Ringmer Vicarage sex murder mystery, by John Kay, published 1986 in Ringmer History (No. 4, article, pp.3-13)
Hannah Smith, an itinerant dealer, in 1838.

Archdeaconry of Chichester: Court Detention Lists, by J. H. Bishop, published December 1986 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 7 no. 3, article, pp.85-86) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 10461] & The Keep [LIB/501259] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

G. C. Smith and the George Long Prize for Jurisprudence, by Maurice J. Burn, published March 1987 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 7 no. 4, article, pp.132-133) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 10461] & The Keep [LIB/501259] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
G C Smith (1865-1897) son of Richard and Esther Smith was educated at Brighton School and University of London. He was successful in school, but instead of following the law he played the Stock Exchange unsuccessfully, and took his own life in 1897. Illustrated by a photograph of G C Smith. Article covers the years 1878 - 1897 in the parishes of Brighton and London

The true story of the Ollie murder [at Shoreham], by Jim Marshall, ex-Detective Chief Superintendent Sussex Police, published 25 May 1987 (151 pp., Lewes: Seagull, ISBN-10: 0863322816 & ISBN-13: 9780863322815) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

John Lawrence: the last man to be hanged in Horsham, by Ronald Tibble, published January 1988 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 39, article, p.21) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/39] & The Keep [LIB/500482]

The Common Peace: Legal Structure and Legal Substance in East Sussex 1594-1640, by Cynthia B. Herrup, published c.1989 accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502083]

The Great Ashdown Forest Case, by R. Cocks, published 1989 in Legal Record and Historical Reality (article, p.192)

Justices and administration: the political development of Sussex 1660-1714. , by Peter Joseph Le Fevre, 1989 at University of Brighton (Ph.D. thesis) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502099][Lib/502100]

Midhurst Today and Tomorrow: A Durable Quality, by J-D [ Mrs D.V.F. Johnson-Davies ?], published July 1989 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 1 Number 4, article, pp.13-16, Summer 1989) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15967]
Abstract:
Midhust Magistrates Court which closed in April 1989: Incidences and characters from the 1800s to closure.

The Common Peace: Participation and the Criminal Law in Seventeenth-Century England, by Cynthia B. Herrup, published 25 August 1989 (Cambridge Studies in Early Modern British History, 252 pp., Cambridge University Press, ISBN-10: 0521375878 & ISBN-13: 9780521375870) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502180]
Abstract:
The Common Peace traces the attitudes behind the enforcement of the criminal law in early modern England. Focusing on five stages in prosecution (arrest, bail, indictment, conviction and sentencing), the book uses a variety of types of sources - court records, biographical information, state papers, legal commentaries, popular and didactic literature - to reconstruct who actually enforced the criminal law and what values they brought to its enforcement. A close study of the courts in eastern Sussex between 1592 and 1640 allows Dr Herrup to show that an amorphous collection of modest property holders participated actively in the legal process. These yeomen and husbandmen who appeared as victims, constables, witnesses and jurors were as important to the credibility of the law as were the justices and judges. The uses of the law embodied the ideas of these middling men about not only law and order but also religion and good government. By arguing that legal administration was part of the routine agenda of obligation for middling property holders, Dr Herrup shows how the expectations produced by legal activities are important for understanding the decades immediately before the outbreak of the English Civil War. As the first book to use early seventeenth-century legal records outside of Essex, The Common Peace adopts an explicitly comparative framework, attempting to trace the ways that social conditions influenced legal process as well as law enforcement in various counties. By blending social history, legal history and political history, this volume offers a complement to more conventional studies of legal records and of local government.

Constables in Sussex, by Moya Kendall, published September 1989 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 44, article, p.26) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/44] & The Keep [LIB/500482]

Midhurst Petty Sessions: Important to Farmers, by West Sussex Gazette, published December 1989 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 2 Number 2, article, pp.29-30, Winter 1989) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15967]
Abstract:
Report from Midhurst Petty Sessions, from the West Sussex Gazette 8 April 1915. Case of suspected sheep worrying by 2 terriers. The dogs were acquitted!

Sussex Murders, by David Briffett, published 1990 (160 pp., Berkshire: Countryside Books, ISBN-10: 1854550454 & ISBN-13: 9781854550453) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Policing by consent in the 1980s : national initiatives and local adaptation in Sussex , by Alain Guyomarch, 1990 at London School of Economics and Political Science (Ph.D. thesis)   View Online
Abstract:
This thesis analyses "policing by consent" as an ideal of legitimate and effective public service provision, and the influence of that ideal on policymaking to reform policing methods, structures and powers in Britain during the 1980s. It considers the relevance of "policing by consent" both to the processes of policy initiation and adoption at the national level and to the practices of policy implementation at the local level in one rural provincial police force. The thesis explains the incoherent nature of the reforms adopted and the conflicting goals of the various participants in the policy debates. The ambiguity of the concept of "policing by consent" allowed different objectives to be pursued behind a discourse common to most of the participants. Improving the public's estimation of the police service was only one goal of the policy makers; increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of the 43 police forces of England and Wales was an equally important objective. The thesis explores and explains the non-coincidence of the aims and preoccupations of the national policy-makers with those of many of the police officers responsible for implementing the reforms on the ground. By analysing how police officers in a non-crisis area, a rural county, react to and interpret both the reforms and the discourse about "policing by consent", this thesis extends and complements existing studies of public opinion and police attitudes in problem urban areas. If those officers feel less isolated than their urban colleagues they nonetheless resent both the imposition of policies irrelevant to their local circumstances and their own loss of self-esteem because of association with the negative public image of an increasingly "nationalised" police service

Putting the Record Straight, by R. C. Grant, published March 1990 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 9 no. 1, article, pp.15-17) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 11999] & The Keep [LIB/501261] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The story of the 23 or 24 year old James Rook, highwayman, hanged and gibbeted near Brighton in 1793.

Personal Actions in the High Court of Battle Abbey 1450-1602, by John H. Baker, published November 1992 in Cambridge Law Journal (vol. 51, issue 3, article, pp.508-529) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502318]

"Rex v Blake": Sussex attitudes toward the Military and Blake's trial for sedition in 1804, by G.E. Bentley, Jr., published 1993 in Huntington Library Quarterly (vol. 56, no. 1, article, pp.83-89)
William Blake, the poet and artist, was tried in Chichester.

Chichester Archdeaconry Court Detection Lists, 1606-1609, by John H. Bishop, published October 1993 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 52, article, p.5) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/52] & The Keep [LIB/500483]

Crime and Disorder in Late Georgian Alfriston , by W. H. Johnson, published 1994 (95 pp., Downsway Books, ISBN-10: 0951856448 & ISBN-13: 9780951856444) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/501783] & East Sussex Libraries

The Trials and Tribulations of Robert Perigoe, by J. A. Beaden, published March 1994 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 11 no. 1, article, pp.21-23) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14878] & The Keep [LIB/501263] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The story of Robert Perigoe born c. 1562 of Hastings

West Sussex Testamentary Disputes in the 16th and 17th Centuries, by George Hothersall, published April 1994 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 53, article, p.20) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/53] & The Keep [LIB/500483]

Crime and Misadventure, by J.S., published July 1994 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 6 Number 4, article, pp.31-33, Summer 1994) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15968]
Abstract:
Extracts from the Calendar of Assize Records for Sussex 1603-1625. Stories of burglary and violence and their subsequent punishments. Many local names included.

My First Convict - James Coddington, by Yvonne Browning, published September 1994 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 11 no. 3, article, pp.109-111) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14878] & The Keep [LIB/501263] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

Transportation (by mistake) of the Boy Etsell, by Mrs. Rachel Fletcher, published March 1995 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 11 no. 5, article, pp.164-166) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14878] & The Keep [LIB/501263] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The story of Charles Edsell/Etsell, born 1805 at Chichester, the illegitimate son of Emma Edsell, who was transported for life for "stealing from the Guardians of Poor at Yapton one jacket 2s and one pair of trousers 2s" that he was wearing when he ran away from Yapton Workhouse on 2 December 1835.

A Kidnap, Murder & Illegal Adoption in Sussex in the 1830s, by Helen Harries, published March 1995 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 11 no. 5, article, pp.194-195) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14878] & The Keep [LIB/501263] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Melbourne police records regarding James Brockhurst

Some lighter moments in Chichester Archdeaconry Court, by John H. Bishop, published April 1995 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 55, article, p.20) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/55] & The Keep [LIB/500483]

The onion pie murder at Gun Hill in the parish of Chiddingly, 1852, by W. H. Johnson, published 1 May 1995 (19 pp., Downsway Books, ISBN-10: 0951856456 & ISBN-13: 9780951856451) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502606] & British Library & East Sussex Libraries

Sackful of Pigeons: West Firle - 1814-1815: Crimes & Criminals of Old Sussex, by W. H. Johnson, published 1 August 1995 (13 pp., Downsway Books, ISBN-10: 0951856472 & ISBN-13: 9780951856475) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502654] & British Library & East Sussex Libraries

Dr. Burn's Casebook, by B. A. White, published September 1995 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 11 no. 7, article, pp.243-244) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14878] & The Keep [LIB/501263] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Extracts relating to Sussex from Vol 4 of the 22nd edition of Burn's Justice of the Peace and Parish Officer dated 1814.

Sussex Lawyers in 1839, by Ronald Newman, published September 1995 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 11 no. 7, article, pp.255-256) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14878] & The Keep [LIB/501263] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Extract from Pigot & Co. Directory of 1839

Dr. Burn's Casebook, by B. A. White, published December 1995 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 11 no. 8, article, pp.283-285) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14878] & The Keep [LIB/501263] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Extracts relating to Sussex from Vol 4 of the 22nd edition of Burn's Justice of the Peace and Parish Officer dated 1814.

Some Sussex Women Who Strayed Part 1, by Brian Roser, published March 1996 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 12 no. 1, article, pp.3-6) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14879] & The Keep [LIB/501165] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Priscilla Jones was the earliest woman in Van Diemen's land to have been sentenced in Sussex in 1812 and transported in 1814. Hannah Selby had passed forged notes and was convicted in 1821 and transported that year. Frances Coningsbury (née Previtt, alias Waddell) convicted in 1822 of stealing.

Some Sussex Women Who Strayed Part 2, by Brian Roser, published June 1996 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 12 no. 2, article, pp.49-52) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14879] & The Keep [LIB/508809] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Harriet Brown was convicted in 1826 of larceny and awarded seven years transportation.

Sussex Chantry Depositions, 1715-50, by Frank Leeson, published June 1996 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 12 no. 2, article, pp.76-77) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14879] & The Keep [LIB/508809] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

Sussex Chancery Proceedings prior to 1714, by Ian Hilder, published September 1996 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 12 no. 3, article, p.85) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14879] & The Keep [LIB/508810] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

The Accounts of the Constable of Worth, by Kay Priestley, published September 1996 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 12 no. 3, article, pp.101-103) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14879] & The Keep [LIB/508810] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Constable Richard Page's accounts at Worth in 1647 during the Commonwealth

Some Sussex Women Who Strayed Part 3, by Brian Roser, published September 1996 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 12 no. 3, article, pp.106-108) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14879] & The Keep [LIB/508810] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Caroline Hopper née Butterworth? was convicted of larceny in 1826 and a death sentence was recorded for her but this was commuted to Life and she sailed in 1827 to Van Diemen's Land. Sarah Bell saw the judge don his sepulchral black cap and heard him intone the death sentence for larceny. She was transported to Van Diemen's Land in 1828.

Rioting in Midhurst., by John Ainsworth, published October 1996 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 9 Number 1, article, pp.9-11, Autumn 1996) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15969]
Abstract:
Report in the West Sussex Gazette (1900) of conflict between supporters of the Boer War troops and young men who were said to express 'pro-Boer sympathies', and the sunsequent court enquiry.

A Chharge of Sheep Stealing - 1915, by J F Ainsworth, published December 1996 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 9 Number 2, article, pp.15-17, Winter 1996) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15969]
Abstract:
Reports from Chichester City Petty Sessions in August and October 1915, published in the Chichester Observer. George Constance of Upwaltham was charged and found guilty of stealing 10 sheep from his employers Henry Hayter and William Hedgcock of Upwaltham.

Previous Offences: Sussex Crimes and Punishments in the Past, by W. H. Johnson, published March 1997 (88 pp., Seaford: S. B. Publications, ISBN-10: 1857701232 & ISBN-13: 9781857701234) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502158] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Sussex Lawyers in 1839 - Addenda et corrigenda, by Ronald F. Newman, published March 1997 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 12 no. 5, article, p.184) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14879] & The Keep [LIB/508812] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Extract from Pigot & Co. Directory of 1839

Sussex Gentlemen Admitted at Gray's Inn 1583-1887, by Ronald F. Newman, published June 1998 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 13 no. 2, article, pp.59-62) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14880] & The Keep [LIB/508817] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Extracted from The Register of Admissions to Gray's Inn 1521-1889 edited by Joseph Foster and privately printed in 1889.

Captain Swing Riots, 1830, by R. L. Burgess, published September 1998 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 13 no. 3, article, p.99) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14880] & The Keep [LIB/508818] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

Midhurst Petty Sessions: 1916, by J F Ainsworth, published October 1998 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 11 Number 1, article, pp.29-29, Autumn 1998) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15969]
Abstract:
Two items from Midhurst Petty Sessions 1916: one for having too strong a cycle light and the second for poaching a hare!

Crime and Criminals of Battle in the Middle of the Nineteenth Century, by Pamela M. Corbett and illustrated by Angela Van Tilborg, published December 1998 (56 pp., published by the author, ISBN-10: 0953430006 & ISBN-13: 9780953430000) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502483] & East Sussex Libraries

Whipping at the Cart's Tail, by Jack Tymer, published April 1999 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 11 Number 3, article, pp.19-21, Spring 1999) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15969]
Abstract:
Violent 18th century punishment in Sussex, with particular reference to Horsham. Details and a numbeer of surnames from the Horsham Azzizes Records.

The strange case of Dr John Bodkin Adams and the views of those who knew him, by John Surtees, published 2000 (176 pp., Seaford: S.B., ISBN-10: 1857701089 & ISBN-13: 9781857701081) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Prisoners of Mother England, by F J-D [Mrs D.V.F Johnson-Davies], published July 2000 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 12 Number 4, article, pp.11-14, Summer 2000) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15969]
Abstract:
The origin of the Austrailian expression for the English! Also names of some of the transportees, and their crimes, who were transported from the Midhurst area 1778-1853.

Captain Swing, by Eric Hobsbawm and George Rud&eacuute;, published 15 February 2001 (new edition, originally published 1969, 384 pp., Phoenix, ISBN-10: 1842122355 & ISBN-13: 9781842122358) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
For generation upon generation, the English farm labourer lived a life of poverty and degradation. Centuries came and went, but the lives of the rural poor remained essentially unaltered. With the onset of the industrial revolution, however, new forces came into play, which were to lead to profound change across society, including the world of the poor farm labourer and yeoman farmer. As capitalism penetrated ever deeper into the countryside, tension reached breaking point. From 1830 onwards, rural England was shaken by a series of uprisings known as the "Swing". There were riots across the counties of southern and eastern England, machinery was wrecked, and farm buildings set alight. Captain Swing is the history of these uprisings, the people who made them and what subsequently became of them. It is the history of the rural poor of England and of lives without trace. And, in charting the rise and fall of the "Swing" uprisings, it is also a compelling account of the triumph of rural capitalism in the early nineteenth century. First published in 1969, Captain Swing has long been regarded as a classic work of English history.

The black sheep of the family, by David Steer, published December 2001 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 14 no. 8, article, pp.334-335) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14881] & The Keep [LIB/508823] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Daniel Steer (1817-1848), son of James Steer, lodge keeper at Petworth Park, and Ann née Rapson, married Jane Norris in Petworth on 24 July 1844. Daniel committed a number of offences, found guilty of extortion and sentenced to transportation for life which was commuted to life imprisonment. Daniel died in Milbank Prison in London 28 April 1848.

A convict's story, by Brenda Joyce, published June 2002 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 15 no. 2, article, pp.60-63) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15249] & The Keep [LIB/508827] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The story of Anthony Arnell (1805-1849), the son of Francis Arnell and Ann née Lambeth, who was transported to Australia in 1837.

Sussex Tales of Mystery and Murder, by W. H. Johnson, published 31 October 2002 (128 pp., Berkshire: Countryside Books, ISBN-10: 185306744X & ISBN-13: 9781853067440) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The Horsham Calendar of Crimes and Criminals: Accounts of Some Criminal Cases in Horsham Museum Archives, by Audrey Goffe, Norman Hewell, John Hurd and Sheila Stevens and edited by Susan C. Djarbi, published 7 March 2003 (102 pp., Horsham Museum Society, ISBN-10: 1902484215 & ISBN-13: 9781902484211) accessible at: Horsham Museum Society & West Sussex Libraries

Sussex Villains, by W. H. Johnson, published 23 October 2003 (128 pp., Berkshire: Countryside Books, ISBN-10: 1853068055 & ISBN-13: 9781853068058) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/509439] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Hanged for a Sheep: Crime in Bygone Sussex, by Dick Richardson, published 1 October 2003 (80 pp., Country Books, ISBN-10: 1898941858 & ISBN-13: 9781898941859) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Women of Victorian Sussex: Their status, occupations and dealings with the law, by Helena Wojtczak, published 9 December 2003 (256 pp., Hastings Press, ISBN-10: 1904109055 & ISBN-13: 9781904109051) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Swing rioters 'down under', by R. C. Grant, published December 2003 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 15 no. 8, article, p.357) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15249] & The Keep [LIB/508827] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Swing rioters were transported to Australia in 1831, 1832 and 1833. A list is given of those transported who had Sussex connections - name, year of birth, residence, whether married, whether children, death, destination and name of ship.

The murder of Mr Grebell: madness and civility in an English town , by Paul Kleber Monod, published 2004 (320 pp., New Haven: Yale University Press, ISBN-13: 9780300099850) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
On a winter night in 1743, a local magistrate was stabbed to death in the churchyard of Rye by an angry butcher. Why did this gruesome crime happen? What does it reveal about the political, economic, and cultural patterns that existed in this small English port town ?

Accident or murder?, by Peter Hunnisett, published March 2004 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 16 no. 1, article, pp.30-35) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15860] & The Keep [LIB/508834] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The witness depositions from the inquest on two-year-old Thomas Edward Pennington Hunnisett which were used at the trial when his mother, Elizabeth, was accused of his murder in 1862.

Court in the Act: Crime and Policing in WWII Hastings, by Victoria Seymour, published 8 October 2004 (vi + 152 pp., published by the author, ISBN-10: 0954390121 & ISBN-13: 9780954390129) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries

The Trail of the Serpent: The True Story of a Victorian Murder on the London-to-Brighton Railway Line, by James Gardner, published 18 November 2004 (192 pp., Pomegranate Press, ISBN-10: 0954258762 & ISBN-13: 9780954258764) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502147] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The Medieval Sheriffs of Surrey and Sussex 1066-1400, by Michael J Burchall, published 2005 (pamphlet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15543]

Sussex Murders, by W. H. Johnson, published 27 October 2005 (152 pp., The History Press, ISBN-10: 0750941278 & ISBN-13: 9780750941273) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Contained within the pages of this book are the stories behind some of the most notorious murders in Sussex's history. Based upon contemporary documents and illustrations, Johnnie Johnson re-examines some of the crimes that shocked not only the county but Britain as a whole. Among the gruesome cases featured here are the mystery man who should his wife and three children in a house in Eastbourne, the Cheif Constable who was bludgeoned to death in his own police station; the fearsome gang of smugglers who tortured and buried one of their two victims alive and threw the second to his death down a well; and the waiter who danced away the days while his lady friend's body lay mouldering in a trunk in his lodgings. All manner of murder and mystery is featured here, and this book is sure to be a must-read for try crime enthusiasts everywhere.

A stranger in blood: the case files on Dr John Bodkin Adams, by Pamela V. Halliday Cullen, published 2006 (687 pp., London: Elliot & Thompson, ISBN-10: 1904027199 & ISBN-13: 9781904027195) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Captain Swing in Sussex and Kent: Rural Rebellion in 1830, by Mike Matthews, published 2006 (viii + 116 pp., Hastings Press, ISBN-10: 1904109136 & ISBN-13: 9781904109136) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
The Untold Story of Rural Class War in the South-East of England.
In?1830, after the prolonged agricultural recession that followed the close of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815, a series of riots swept across England's southern counties. The outbreaks went on to spread, largely unchecked, into East Anglia, the Midlands and several northern counties, eventually to reach Carlisle. The economic hardship of the long-suffering, wretchedly oppressed and half-starved labourers had become so acute that their usual forbearance finally snapped. This agrarian rebellion was fuelled by an unprecedented level of class hatred and bitterness. Driven by a blind desire for revenge and reprisal against the farmers and their wealthy friends, the farmhands were set on a course of violent, direct retaliatory action, regardless of the consequences.
Mike Matthews, the author charts Swing's progress through just two southern counties, Kent and Sussex, which suffered the greatest levels of incendiarism and destruction of machinery, but this is not a comprehensive regional study of the riots, since to list in chronological order one lawless episode after another would soon become very tedious for the reader: the destruction of farm premises and machinery in Kent and Sussex was on an immense scale, as will become abundantly clear in this narrative. Wherever possible he has tried to avoid duplicating existing published material on Swing, and, whenever feasible, has attempted to combine all the previous historical information on the riots into detailed case-studies of various size. Two chapters contain subject matter relating to the outbreaks that has never before been seen in print and readers interested in the emergence of agricultural trade unionism will learn something new.
Captain Swing explores, closely, what county and national reporters in 1830 were calling a 'war of poverty against property', a civil strife of 'destitution against possession', and breathes new life and colour into the criminal exploits and violent resistance of the Captain Swing insurgents, to endeavour to understand what their contemporaries described apprehensively as 'their dark mischief' and 'state of reckless insubordination'.
Review by Sarah Hanna in Sussex Past and Present no. 118, August 2009:
Subtitled Rural Rebellion in 1830, the book traces the story of these widespread riots, which flared briefly through southern England in the early 1830s. This was a time of depressed grain prices following the Napoleonic wars, when agricultural unemployment was growing and farm labourers believed their jobs were threatened by mechanisation; hence the destruction of new farm machinery, especially horse operated 'thrashing' (or threshing) machines. The rural unrest led to near panic among the landed classes, and was perhaps the start of rural depopulation which continued through the nineteenth century.
A comprehensive history of the riots, Captain Swing by Eric Hobsbawm and George Rudé appeared in 1969, and Mike Matthews complements this story with a detailed study of the process operating locally, for instance he has pinpointed possibly the first incident at Ripple, near Deal in Kent on August 5 1830, earlier than was previously known. This absorbing story is well-referenced and brings to light fascinating details, such as the sad stories of individuals executed as scapegoats, one of whom was probably convicted by the witness testimony of the real perpetrator of the crime.
The illustrations are rather limited, consisting of various commercially available threshing machines and public notices of the period and this is an account of mainly local interest, which does not dwell on the major themes of nineteenth century social change.

Transported!: The True Story of Two Brothers Transported to Australia for Fifteen Years in the Middle of the Nineteenth Century, by Stuart West, published 2006 (published by the author)
Preview:
The story of John and Robert West

Jack Upperton's Gibbet, by Helen Whittle, published December 2006 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 17 no. 4, article, pp.182-185) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15860] & The Keep [LIB/508988] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The story behind Jack Upperton who was executed at Horsham Gaol in 1771 for robbery

Brighton Crime and Vice, 1800-2000, by Douglas D'Enno, published 19 July 2007 (224 pp., Wharncliffe Books, ISBN-10: 1845630300 & ISBN-13: 9781845630300) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

The murder of Billie-Jo, by Siôn Jenkins and Bob Woffinden, published 2008 (462 pp., London: John Blake, ISBN-10: 1844546292 & ISBN-13: 9781844546299) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Co-author Jenkins was the foster father of Billie-Jo Jenkins, and had just been appointed headmaster of a local secondary school when she was murdered at her home in Hastings on the 15 February 1997. He was convicted of the crime in 1998 and sent to jail for life, but was acquitted in 2006. Consists of transcripts of the trial at Lewes in 1924. Patrick Herbert Mahon was accused of the murder of his lover, the pregnant Emily Beilby Kaye, on the 15 April 1924 at The Crumbles, in the parish of Westham, between Eastbourne and Pevensey Bay. He was executed. Consists of transcripts of the trial at Lewes in 1949. He was accused of the murder of six persons including Dr Archibald Henderson and his wife Rose on the 13 February 1948 at Crawley and Mrs Olive Durand-Deacon, widow of a solicitor, on the 18 February 1949, also at Crawley. He was executed. Haigh was accused of the murder of six persons including Dr Archibald Henderson and his wife Rose on the 13 February 1948 at Crawley and Mrs Olive Durand-Deacon, widow of a solicitor, on the 18 February 1949, also at Crawley. He was executed. Haigh was accused of the murder of six persons including Dr Archibald Henderson and his wife Rose on the 13 February 1948 at Crawley and Mrs Olive Durand-Deacon, widow of a solicitor, on the 18 February 1949, also at Crawley. He was executed. Haigh was accused of the murder of six persons including Dr Archibald Henderson and his wife Rose on the 13 February 1948 at Crawley and Mrs Olive Durand-Deacon, widow of a solicitor, on the 18 February 1949, also at Crawley. He was executed. Haigh was accused of the murder of six persons including Dr Archibald Henderson and his wife Rose on the 13 February 1948 at Crawley and Mrs Olive Durand-Deacon, widow of a solicitor, on the 18 February 1949, also at Crawley. He was executed. Haigh was accused of the murder of six persons including Dr Archibald Henderson and his wife Rose on the 13 February 1948 at Crawley and Mrs Olive Durand-Deacon, widow of a solicitor, on the 18 February 1949, also at Crawley. He was executed. Haigh was accused of the murder of six persons including Dr Archibald Henderson and his wife Rose on the 13 February 1948 at Crawley and Mrs Olive Durand-Deacon, widow of a solicitor, on the 18 February 1949, also at Crawley. He was executed. Haigh was accused of the murder of six persons including Dr Archibald Henderson and his wife Rose on the 13 February 1948 at Crawley and Mrs Olive Durand-Deacon, widow of a solicitor, on the 18 February 1949, also at Crawley. He was executed. John Bodkin Adams (1899-1983) lived in Eastbourne. He was a general practitioner, convicted fraudster and suspected serial killer. Between 1946 and 1956, more than 160 of his patients died in suspicious circumstances. He was acquitted of murder at the Old Bailey in 1957 but was found guilty at Lewes of forgery on prescription forms and making false statements on cremation forms, and was fined. The Scotland Yard archives on his case were released in 2003. John Bodkin Adams (1899-1983) lived in Eastbourne. He was a general practitioner, convicted fraudster and suspected serial killer. Between 1946 and 1956, more than 160 of his patients died in suspicious circumstances. He was acquitted of murder at the Old John Bodkin Adams (1899-1983) lived in Eastbourne. He was a general practitioner, convicted fraudster and suspected serial killer. Between 1946 and 1956, more than 160 of his patients died in suspicious circumstances. He was acquitted of murder at the Old John Bodkin Adams (1899-1983) lived in Eastbourne. He was a general practitioner, convicted fraudster and suspected serial killer. Between 1946 and 1956, more than 160 of his patients died in suspicious circumstances. He was acquitted of murder at the Old John Bodkin Adams (1899-1983) lived in Eastbourne. He was a general practitioner, convicted fraudster and suspected serial killer. Between 1946 and 1956, more than 160 of his patients died in suspicious circumstances. He was acquitted of murder at the Old George Keith was born a Presbyterian in Scotland, became a Quaker, and then became an Anglican, and ended as the Rector of Edburton. He was a prolific author. Gives the results of a research project searching for evidence of courtship in Brighton Museum's holdings of mainly topographical early twentieth-century postcards. On the Baptists. Forgeries perpetuated by Lewes Priory. Discusses Winchelsea, Chester and Southampton. Report on the antiquities lately found at Lewes Using correspondence, it is shown that Rye merchant Samuel Jeake (1652?1699) and his wife, Elizabeth (1667?1736) were involved with the with the London fashion trade at a time when fashion styles spread mainly by word of mouth. Reviews an exhibition on Eric Ravilious and his circle at the Towner Art Gallery, Eastbourne (May 27-September 17, 2017). Baptist chapels in small communities. Baptist preacher John Burgess of Ditchling, whose diary for 1785-90 was at the time of writing with the family at Lewes. Reviews the historical sources for the location of the Battle of Hastings and and concludes that there is strong evidence that Battle Abbey was founded on the actual battlefield. Remains of two ships were found in 1963 while excavating for a new sewage system. In the late 15th century, a monumental brass was laid in the church at Etchingham to the memory of two spinsters, Elizabeth Etchingham, who died in 1452, and Agnes Oxenbridge, who died in 1480. Investigates the possible social meanings of their brass, with reference to Alan Bray's recent interpretations of other funeral monuments dedicated to same-sex couples. Archaeological evidence is used to examine how urban life changed in the later medieval towns of Sussex, Surrey, and Hampshire, in light of debates about the existence of a fifteenth-century urban ?decline'. An old lantern nicknamed the ?Moon'. Thought to be left by Freemasons during its construction. Found at Bow Hill. Suggests that Harold was suffering from depression at the time of the battle. Fanny Cornforth (1835-1909), born Steyning, died Chichester, was both model and mistress of Dante Gabriel Rossetti, poet. Surtees is a pathologist who is an expert on suicides at Beachy Head.

Unstable boundaries on a cliffed coast: geomorphology and British laws, by Derek J. McGlashan, Robert W. Duck, and Colin T. Reid, published 2008 in Journal of Coastal Research  (vol. 24, article, pp.181-188)
Coastal erosion is a problem around much of the coast of Great Britain. This paper uses the example of Birling Gap in East Sussex to highlight a variety of problems associated with property boundaries on eroding cliffed coasts. The legal foreshore definitions (generally owned by the Crown) from English and Scots laws are compared with the use of tidal data from the nearest reliable tide gauge at Newhaven. With a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model and shore profiling, these data are used to identify the extent of private property in the coastal environment at Birling Gap under both Scots and English law. The paper highlights that under both definitions, a small parcel of ?land? exists at the base of the cliffs that is owned by the adjacent cliff top landowner. Therefore, the foreshores as defined in (Scots and English) law on the mainland of Great Britain do not fully enclose the envelope of coastal processes. Under Scots and English law, the foreshore is defined on the basis of tidal heights, irrespective of the mobility of the substrate that the foreshore boundary is drawn on. The cliff morphology at Birling Gap strongly suggests control by marine erosion; however, the tidal data from Newhaven suggest otherwise when compared with the shore profiles. A number of reasons are identified to explain a substantial difference in the height of the beach at Birling Gap and the observed tidal heights at Newhaven, including the distance from the tide gauge, the damping effects of tide gauges, and the morphology of the beach. We conclude that, under British property laws, a small area of the upper beach (which regularly changes in shape and size) is owned by the adjacent landowner and is technically under their control despite being regularly inundated by the tides.

1661-1800 Sussex Poor 1, compiled by Michael Burchall, published 2008 by Parish Register Transcription Society (Ref: BPS6, CD-ROM) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/501589][Lib/504790]
Abstract:
Full details of 8000 Quarter Session cases involving 20,000 people (criminals and victims, apprentices, bastardy, lunatics, settlement, workhouses, gaols, soldiers ..) from all nine Sussex venues. Transcribed and indexed by Michael Burchall FSG.

Unstable boundaries on a cliffed coast: geomorphology and British laws, by Derek J. McGlashan, Robert W. Duck and Colin T. Reid, published January 2008 in Journal of Coastal Research (vol. 24, no. 1A, supplement, article, pp.181-188)

Bent Cops: The Brighton Police Conspiracy Trial, by David Rowland, published 24 June 2008 (150 pp., Peacehaven: Finsbury Publishing, ISBN-10: 0953939278 & ISBN-13: 9780953939275) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries

The Brighton Trunk Murders, by David Rowland, published 20 December 2008 (142 pp., Peacehaven: Finsbury Publishing, ISBN-10: 0953939286 & ISBN-13: 9780953939282) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries

The death and times of Chief Constable Solomon, by David Rowland, published 2009 (94 pp., Peacehaven: Finsbury Publishing, ISBN-13: 9780953939299) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/507983] & British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Henry Solomon (1796-1844) was appointed Chief Constable of Brighton police in 1838. This was an unusual position for a Jew at the time. He was mortally wounded by John Lawrence while questioning him in his cell about a theft of a roll of carpet

"A fabricated perjury": The [mis]trial of William Blake, by Mark Crosby, published March 2009 in Huntington Library Quarterly (vol. 72, no. 1, article, pp.29-47)
William Blake, the poet and artist, was tried in Chichester for sedition in 1804.

A Murder in Brighton, by Adrian Buckley, published 9 March 2010 (42 pp., Guildford: Grosvenor House Publications Ltd., ISBN-10: 1907211837 & ISBN-13: 9781907211836) accessible at: British Library
Abstract:
Jackie Buckley opened her dance studio and club in Brighton in the 1920s. She kept it running even when war broke out in 1939 and despite bombs and blackouts, the Berkeley Club remained a south coast magnet where war weary men and women could dance to the latest tunes. Jackie took full advantage of her beauty, dancing skills and popularity. Brighton's glitterati flocked to her door. Then in November, 1940, her glamourous world was shattered. She was found dead outside the club. The country's leading pathologist, Sir Bernard Spilsbury, was called in. The inquest jury returned their verdict: Murder by person or persons unknown.

Was it murder by poisoning?, by Sue Randall, published September 2010 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 19 no. 3, article, pp.130-133) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15860] & The Keep [LIB/508844] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
John DAY, son of James and Mary, was christened 18 October 1807 at Saint Mary's, Portsea, Hampshire and married Sarah FRAMPTON on 17 February 1828 in Alverstoke; witnessed by Hannah FRAMPTON. Their child Sarah Jane was christened in Portsea seven months later. My great-great-grandfather John Charles (1832) was born in Brighton. He was christened at St Nicholas Church, as were his sisters Mary Ann (1834) and Charlotte Henry (1836). Their mother appears to have died when the children were very young. No record of her burial has been found. There could be a clue from the Coroners inquest held on Sunday 15 January 1837 at the Norfolk Arms: "Sarah DAY unfortunately met her death by falling down a well at 4 Surrey Street. Verdict accidental death".

Frenzy! Heath, Haigh & Christie: the first great tabloid murderers, by Neil Root, published 2011 (314 pp., London: Arrow, ISBN-10: 0099557762 & ISBN-13: 9780099557760) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

1789-1867 Sussex Convicts Transported to Australia, published 2011 by Parish Register Transcription Society (Ref: BE02, CD-ROM) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/501593][Lib/504800]
Abstract:
Sussex Convicts Transported to Australia from 1789-1867 is extracted from the National Archives original records (HO11) and referenced to many subsequent secondary sources. The Introduction gives the history of transportation back to 1248.

A Mugsborough Rebel: Alf Cobb and the Struggle for Justice in Hastings , by Mike Matthews, published 19 January 2011 (178 pp., Hastings: Christie Books, ISBN-10: 1873976461 & ISBN-13: 9781873976463) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries

1767-1799 Sussex Criminals and Victims, compiled by Michael J Burchall, published 2012 by Parish Register Transcription Society (Ref: SCV7, CD-ROM) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/508036]
Abstract:
CD arranged by date extracted by Michael J Burchall FSG, from original records in East Sussex Record Office. Detailed abstracts from Quarter Sessions at Chichester, Horsham, Lewes and Petworth listing the Charge, Offenders, Victims, Jurors and the Verdict and the Punishment. Nearly 15,000 persons are named and indexed.

1800-1825 Sussex Criminals and Victims, compiled by Michael J Burchall, published 2012 by Parish Register Transcription Society (Ref: BE03, CD-ROM) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/501587][Lib/504792]
Abstract:
A CD arranged by date extracted by Michael J Burchall FSG, from original records in East Sussex Record Office. Detailed abstracts from Quarter Sessions at Chichester, Horsham, Lewes and Petworth listing the Charge, Offenders, Victims, Jurors and the Verdict and the Punishment. Over 30,000 persons are named and indexed.

The Trials of The Rev. Robert Bingham, Curate of Maresfield, in Sussex, on A Charge of Sending an Incendiary Letter, and of Setting Fire to his Dwelling-House, Before The Lord Chief Baron, At Horsham, March 26th, 1811, by Adams, published 21 February 2012 (248 pp., Gale, Making of Modern Law, ISBN-10: 1275554105 & ISBN-13: 9781275554108)

Death by Chocolate: The Serial Poisoning of Victorian Brighton, by Sophie Jackson, published 15 November 2012 (192 pp. + 16 pp. of plates, Stroud: Fonthill Media, ISBN-10: 1781551049 & ISBN-13: 9781781551042) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
When a little boy dies from strychnine-poisoned chocolates, 1870s Brighton is thrown into panic. When more children are poisoned by sweets they find lying about the town and strange parcels of arsenic-laced cakes are sent to prominent residents the police step up the search for a serial poisoner. Who is determined to take revenge on the town? The story of Christiana Edmunds (1828-1907), a Brighton resident who in 1872 was tried at the Old Bailey for one murder and one attempted murder. She spent the rest of her life in Broadmoor.

1826-1850 Sussex Criminals and Victims, compiled by Michael Burchall, published 2013 by Parish Register Transcription Society (Ref: SCV9, CD-ROM) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/507812]
Abstract:
Calendared CD extracted by Michael J Burchall FSG of Quarter Sessions at Chichester, Horsham, Lewes and Petworth from records in East Sussex Record Office. Detailed abstracts listing the Charge, Offenders, Victims, Jurors and the Verdict with the Punishment. It has many more cases than the two CDs covering earlier periods though the same price. The series has up to a quarter of a million names and is word searchable to find a person, crime, location or date etc. An invaluable reference tool for local and family historians and other researchers of this quarter century when Sussex was rapidly changing from a mediaeval to a more modern administration.

A Marked Card, by Reginald Kyrke, published March 2013 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 20 no. 5, article, pp.207-209) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/508976] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The place is the Borough of Lewes, and the time is ten minutes to twelve on the morning of Tuesday, 21 August 1849. A large crowd is standing in North Street, Market Street, East Street and Little East Street. Attention is centred on a strange wooden structure projecting above the wall of the House of Correction and County Goal, exactly opposite to the end of Little East Street, where the throng is at its densest - a curious goal post like erection, with a weighted rope stretched dangling from the middle of the crossbeam, almost touching a platform level with the inside of the wall parapet. The top-hatted figures of Superintendent HARPER, Inspectors FLANAGAN and DAWES, with those of eight Police Constables, move with some difficulty through the press of people, who are remarkably quiet and sober. Little East Street is quite choked with sightseers, who overflow into Waterloo Street, where Sergeant AKEHURST keeps watch with nine more Constables.
Sarah CARD, aged eight, is indoors at 16 West Street; her mother is brushing her hair before sending her down town to Priory Street on an errand to her aunt. "Now Sally, you are to go straight there - along Star Lane (now Fisher Street) and down St. Mary's Lane (now Station Street) no dodging about round corners - do you hear me?" She gives her daughter a little shake. Sally hears well enough but says nothing.

The First British Railway Murder, by James Gardner, published 1 April 2013 (162 pp., published by the author, ISBN-10: 0953610128 & ISBN-13: 9780953610129) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/507816]

The Rural War: Captain Swing and the Politics of Protest, by Brian Short, published October 2013 in The Journal of Historical Geography (vol. 42, article, p.22)   View Online

Transcript of Sussex Assizes 1625-1800, edited by Burchall, Michael J, published 2014 (booklet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 18592] & The Keep [LIB/508037]

Violence, authority, cultures and communities in Sussex and Kent c.1690-1760, by Lyndsay Claire Poore, 2014 at University of Hertfordshire (Ph.D. thesis)   View Online
Abstract:
This thesis deploys both qualitative and quantitative methods to explore the role and meanings of violence within the context of Sussex and Kent in the early part of the eighteenth century. Historians have often approached the topic of violence from the perspective of a history of crime and therefore deviance. The focus has frequently been on measurements of levels and has ignored cultural contexts. In contrast, this research is grounded in experiences of violence demonstrating that it is not a uniform concept and includes a wide variety of behaviours from brawls to murder. By drawing on a range of sources it has been possible to allow the ritual and meaning of violent actions to be explored in detailed context. Quantitative data is taken from the quarter sessions records of both counties and analysed alongside the interpretations of previous historians. This is supplemented with depositions, literature, letters and notebooks to provide a 'thick description' of the contexts and circumstances of violence. The experience of violence is explored from a range of angles and at several levels, from anonymous brawls in the street to gang violence to household chastisement, the ritual and meaning of violent actions is investigated in detail. This analysis demonstrates that violence was a subjective concept, dependent on context. No clear definition of violence can be found, instead there are a range of descriptions, portrayals and accounts which all combine to illustrate the plurality of this concept. This thesis concludes that violence was often meaningful and connected with cultural concepts of order, authority and community. It was not random and its purpose can often be found if the signs are read. Evidence for struggles over authority and power can frequently be found as the basis of violent disputes and this can be found at the household, community and county level. This thesis demonstrates how violence was regulated through both formal and informal methods involving concepts of legitimacy and acceptability, as although violence was defined legally the border between legitimate or acceptable and illegitimate and unacceptable was blurred and contested.

The courts of true love, by Peter Wilkinson, published 2014 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 152) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 18617] & The Keep [LIB/508097] & S.A.S. library   View Online
Abstract:
The story of Richard Tayler and Margaret Osborne has two important elements. First, it tells in vivid detail the vicissitudes of a relationship spanning the first 18 years of the 17th century. The events are mainly recounted by observers, ostensibly from the neutral stance of a court witness, yet in many instances revealing their own involvement and sympathies. The range of the subject matter is remarkable. The initial tensions between gentry and yeoman families lead into a saga: courtship, elopement, parental opposition which produces a legal battle, the imposition of an arranged marriage, a young woman's resistance and eventual desertion and, finally, a further legal battle to achieve the remarkable denouement of annulment (divorce in modern terms) and remarriage. Secondly, the medium through which the story is delivered is as significant as the events themselves. The ecclesiastical court process provides a series of witness statements aimed at establishing an impartial narrative of events, rather than a condemnatory description of crime. The court's principles are based on compromise and negotiation rather than the determination of incontrovertible guilt or innocence. But its final decisions demonstrate real power (underestimated by many modern commentators) to enforce major life changes on the litigants who opted to use the system.

The Trial of Dr John Bodkin Adams, by John Surtees, published 2015 (booklet no. 48, East Dean & Friston Local History Group) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/509224] & East Dean & Friston Local History Group
Murderer or Man of Mercy? The controversial case of a local GP.

Gilks' Dunnickin: A Humorous Account of Life on the Beat in West Sussex, by Tony & Lizzie Gilks and illustrated by John Whurr, published 18 April 2015 (248 pp., Astra Books, ISBN-10: 0957512023 & ISBN-13: 9780957512023) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

The acid bath murders: the trials and liquidations of John George Haigh, by Gordon Lowe, published 1 November 2015 (191 pp., Stroud: History Press, ISBN-10: 0750961813 & ISBN-13: 9780750961813) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Death Comes Knocking: Policing Roy Grace's Brighton, by Graham Bartlett with Peter James, published 14 July 2016 (320 pp., Pan Books Ltd., ISBN-10: 150981048X & ISBN-13: 9781509810482) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Fans of Peter James and his bestselling Roy Grace series of crime novels know that his books draw on in-depth research into the lives of Brighton and Hove police and are set in a world every bit as gritty as the real thing. His friend Graham Bartlett was a long-serving detective in the city once described as Britain's 'crime capital'. Together, in Death Comes Knocking, they have written a gripping account of the city's most challenging cases, taking the reader from crime scenes and incident rooms to the morgue, and introducing some of the real-life detectives who inspired Peter James's characters.
Whether it's the murder of a dodgy nightclub owner and his family in Sussex's worst non-terrorist mass murder or the race to find the abductor of a young girl, tracking down the antique trade's most notorious 'knocker boys' or nailing an audacious ring of forgers, hunting for a cold-blooded killer who executed a surfer or catching a pair who kidnapped a businessman, leaving him severely beaten, to die on a hillside, the authors skilfully evoke the dangerous inside story of policing, the personal toll it takes and the dedication of those who risk their lives to keep the public safe.

1625 - 1800 Sussex Assizes, published (no date) by Parish Register Transcription Society (Ref: SXXASZ, CD-ROM)
Abstract:
Abstracts of 2718 cases tried between 1625 and 1800 at the higher Assize Courts held in Lent and Summer at Horsham (which had the county gaol from 1541), East Grinstead (a popular venue for Justices before turnpike roads) and Lewes. The CD complements the classic Millennium of Facts of The History of Horsham and Sussex 947-1947 compiled by William Albery. It also includes a list of Burials of prisoners from Horsham Gaol, and the old and new references to Assize Indictment Files in The National Archives with Dates and Places held, as well as a Surname Index.

1801-1850 The Sussex Poor 2, published (no date) by Parish Register Transcription Society (Ref: BPS9, CD-ROM) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/501590][Lib/504791]
Abstract:
Edited abstracts of all the poor law cases dealt with by justices at Quarter Sessions covering the whole county of Sussex for the period 1801-1850, following on Michael Burchall's earlier CD (BPS6). The Introduction outlines the changing statutes concerning the three major categories of vagrants: idle and disorderly persons, rogues and beggars, and incorrigible rogues.