Bibliography - Migration: Immigration
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Publications

Denization Returns and Lay Subsidy Rolls as Sources for French Iron-workers in the Weald, by B. G. Awty, published 1978 in Wealden Iron Research Group (First Series No. 13, article, pp.17-19) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16400] & The Keep [LIB/506558]   Download PDF

Provisional identifications of ironworkers among French immigrants listed in the Denization rolls of 1541 and 1544, by Brian G. Awty, published 1979 in Wealden Iron Research Group (First Series No. 16, article, pp.2-11) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16400] & The Keep [LIB/506558]   Download PDF

The Mowcombers - A French Family in Sussex, published June 1979 in Sussex Genealogist and Family Historian (vol. 1 no. 1, article, pp.18-20) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 17603] & The Keep [LIB/501187] & CD SXGS from S.F.H.G.

Where our Anglo-Saxon Ancestors may have come from, by Dr. Walter Piroth, published December 1980 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 4 no. 6, article, pp.183-185) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8672] & The Keep [LIB/501256] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

French Immigrant Ironworkers in Sussex, 1541-44, by Brian Awty, published December 1980 in Sussex Genealogist and Family Historian (vol. 2 no. 3, article, pp.102-110) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8671] & The Keep [LIB/501188] & CD SXGS from S.F.H.G.

Where our Anglo-Saxon Ancestors may have come from - some doubts, by Richard Coates, published September 1981 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 4 no. 9, article, pp.287-291) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8672] & The Keep [LIB/501256] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

Iron Industry in the Weald, by Mrs. J. M. Turnbull, published December 1990 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 9 no. 4, article, pp.144-147) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 11999] & The Keep [LIB/501261] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
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The Iron Industry of the Weald including a list of Immigrant Ironworkers c. 1490-1544

The Palatines, by Brian Roser, published March 1994 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 11 no. 1, article, pp.25-26) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14878] & The Keep [LIB/501263] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
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The Roser family were of German origin from the Palatine region of the Rhineland being named among 13,000 economic refugees settled in Britain and North America in the reign of Queen Anne.

Is that you, Mr. Johnson?, by Hedley Hunnisett, published September 1995 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 11 no. 7, article, pp.266-267) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14878] & The Keep [LIB/501263] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
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Tracing the origin of the Hunnisett name from the immigration from the French-speaking Low Countries of Jakes Hanizet, a skilled iron worker, who with his wife Mercy came to this country in 1517 and settled in the Hundred of Rotherfield where in 1543 he was assessed for tax.

Records of the French Community in Brighton, by Vincent Tickner, published June 1997 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 12 no. 6, article, pp.218-220) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14879] & The Keep [LIB/508813] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

Huguenot Ancestors in Rye, by Norman Bishop, published December 1998 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 13 no. 4, article, p.146) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14880] & The Keep [LIB/508819] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
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Dansays were merchants who came from St. Laurant-de-la-Prée, near Fouras at the mouth of River Charente. Anne Dansays, née Ozanneau arrived in 1681 with her three daughters and four orphaned nieces, while her husband Francois came the following year; they settled in Rye.

Search for a Dutch forebear, by A. Joan Reid, published March 2002 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 15 no. 1, article, pp.36-38) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15249] & The Keep [LIB/508827] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.

Please tell the Bishop of Chichester': George Bell and the internment crisis of 1940, by Charmian Brinson and Charmain Brinson, published 2008 in Kirchliche Zeitgeschichte (vol. 21, no. 2, article, pp.287-299)
George Bell (1883-1958) was the Bishop from 1929. He helped interned Germans.

Italian ice cream families in the East Sussex seaside resorts, by Trevor Hopper, published January 2015 in The Local Historian (vol. 45, no. , article)   View Online
Abstract:
This short paper is a case-study of one of the lesser-known groups of migrants to Victorian and Edwardian England. Hopper begins by reviewing the literature on Italian migration to Britain, with special reference to the work of Terri Colpi, and shows how most authorities agree that these migrants had a special affinity with the catering trade in its various manifestations. He then notes how this, almost by definition, made an Italian presence in seaside resorts very likely, and then explains how in the Sussex resorts this role was performed by a small group of interlinked families which formed ice cream 'dynasties'. He discusses examples from, in particular, Hastings, using directories, oral tradition and interviews, published histories and autobiographies as evidence and includes discussion of the most famous of all the migrants, Sir Charles Forte, who was from Monteforte in Lazio, south of Rome, and whose family were closely connected with the Sussex ice cream trade. The article shows how these families in some cases have conducted the business for over a century, in four or five generations, and concludes with observations on their enduring links with the parts of Italy from which their forebears came.