Bibliography - Health and hospitals
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The address, plan, and regulations of the Royal Sussex Jennerian Institution, for the extermination of the Small-Pox, by Sir Matthew John Tierney, published 1804 (Lewes) accessible at: British Library

Monasticon Anglicanum: A History of the Abbies and other Monastries, Hospitals, Frieries, and Cathedral and Collegiate Churches with their dependencies, by William Dugdale, published 1817 (vol. 1, 642 pp., London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Brown) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

Monasticon Anglicanum: A History of the Abbies and other Monastries, Hospitals, Frieries, and Cathedral and Collegiate Churches with their dependencies, by William Dugdale, published 1819 (vol. 2, 643 pp., London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Brown) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

Monasticon Anglicanum: A History of the Abbies and other Monastries, Hospitals, Frieries, and Cathedral and Collegiate Churches with their dependencies, by William Dugdale, published 1821 (vol. 3, 640 pp., London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Brown) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

Monasticon Anglicanum: A History of the Abbies and other Monastries, Hospitals, Frieries, and Cathedral and Collegiate Churches with their dependencies, by William Dugdale, published 1823 (vol. 4, 689 pp., London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Brown) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

Proposed General Infirmary at Chichester [later the Royal West Sussex Hospital], published 1824 accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 5520]
Photocopy of a Prospectus: Chichester, Nov 27th, 1824

Monasticon Anglicanum: A History of the Abbies and other Monastries, Hospitals, Frieries, and Cathedral and Collegiate Churches with their dependencies, by William Dugdale, published 1825 (vol. 5, 747 pp., London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Brown) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

Monasticon Anglicanum: A History of the Abbies and other Monastries, Hospitals, Frieries, and Cathedral and Collegiate Churches with their dependencies, by William Dugdale, published 1830 (vol. 6, London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Brown) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

A Voice from the Dumb; a memoir of J. W. Lashford, late a pupil in the Brighton and Sussex Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, by William Sleight, published 1848 (Brighton: Hamilton, Adams & Co.) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries

On the Hospital of St Mary, in Chichester, by Rev. George Shiffner, published 1849 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 2, article, pp.3-6) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2087] & The Keep [LIB/500221] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Worthing, on the Sussex coast, its merits as a winter residence for invalids briefly considered, by William Beattie, M.D., published 1858 (32 pp., Worthing: M. S. Rickerby) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries

A descriptive notice of the Sussex Lunatic Asylum, Hayward's Heath (opened 25th July, 1859), by C. Lockhart Robinson, Medical Superintendent of the Asylum, published 1859 (38 pp.)   View Online

The Hospital of Lepers at Seaford, by Mark Antony Lower, M.A., F.S.A., published 1860 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 12, article, pp.112-116) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2097] & The Keep [LIB/500231] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Addendum to Notices of St James's Hospital at Seaford, by Mark Antony Lower, published 1860 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 12, notes & queries, pp.269-270) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2097] & The Keep [LIB/500231] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Hospitals in Sussex, by Edward Turner, published 1861 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 13, notes & queries, pp.305-306) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2098] & The Keep [LIB/500232] & S.A.S. library   View Online

A hint and a help to Brighton invalids, by Geo. Corfe, M.D., published 1869 (Brighton: Beal & Son)

The Hospital of St Mary, in Chichester, by C. A. Swainson, D.D., published 1872 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 24, article, pp.41-62) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2109] & The Keep [LIB/500242] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Eastbourne as a Health-Resort, published 30 June 1877 in British Medical Journal (1877, vol. 1, article, pp.806-)   Download PDF

Charge Against The Eastbourne Convalescent Home, published 2 October 1880 in British Medical Journal (vol. 2, no. 1031, article, pp.558-559)

The Hastings, St. Leonards, and East Sussex Hospital, published October 1887 in The Lancet (vol. 130, article, pp.830-831)   View Online

West Sussex, East Hants and Chichester General Infimary, by F. Skaife, published November 1895 in The Lancet (vol. 146, article, pp.1107-1108)

An old English hospital: St Mary's, Chichester, by John Cavis-Brown, published 1898 (pamphlet, 15 pp., Chichester: W. H. Barrett) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 6198] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

The Borough Isolation Hospital, Brighton, published 5 November 1898 in British Medical Journal (vol. 2, article, pp.1453-)   Download PDF

An Old English Hospital: St Mary's, Chichester, by Rev J Cavis-Brown, published c.1900 (pamphlet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 4494] & West Sussex Libraries

Antivaccinist martyrs, published 7 April 1900 in British Medical Journal (vol. 1, no. 2049, article, pp.854-855)

Nicholas Tyacke, M.D., F.R.C.P., J.P., Consulting Physician To The Chichester Hospital, published 19 May 1900 in British Medical Journal (vol. 1, no. 2055, article, pp.1267-1267)

The Second Brighton Life Table, published 7 November 1903 in British Medical Journal (vol. 2, article, pp.1223-)   Download PDF

Bognor as a Health Resort, by H. C. L. Morris, published 1904 (pamphlet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 4229]

The Midwives Act: West Sussex, published 11 May 1907 in British Medical Journal (1907, vol. 1, article, p.1132)   Download PDF

Description of the Eastbourne Isolation Hospital, by W.G. Willoughby, published 1 June 1907 in Journal of the Royal Sanitary Institute (vol. 28, no. 6, article, pp.220-224)

Worthing and its health repute, published 16 November 1907 in British Medical Journal (vol. 2, no. 2246, article, pp.1455-1456)

Reports: Remodelling the Chichester Infirmary, by D. J. Mackintosh and Charles W. Ball, published 1911 (pamphlet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 5379]

The Brighton United Twins, by James A. Rooth, published 23 September 1911 in British Medical Journal (1911, vol. 2, article, pp.653-)   Download PDF

The control of tuberculosis as practised in the county town of Lewes, by J.R. Steinhaeuser, published 1 November 1912 in Journal of the Royal Sanitary Institute (vol. 33, no. 11, article, pp.533-537)
Written by the town's Medical Officer of Health.

Sackville College (Hospitale Sive Collegium), by Frank Hill, published 1913 (vi + 176 pp., East Grinstead: Farncombe & Co. Ltd.) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 11218] & The Keep [LIB/506179] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

A Short History in English, Gurmukhi & Urdu of the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, and a Description of it as a hospital for Indian soldiers, edited by Henry David Roberts, published 1915 (120 pp., Brighton: Director of the Public Library, Brighton) accessible at: British Library

Ticehurst House Hospital: List of of patients 1792-1917, published 1917 (76 pp., The Wellcome Institute)   View Online

The Life of Sophia Jex-Blake, by Margaret Todd, M.D., published 1918 (xviii + 574 pp., London: Macmillan & Co. Ltd.) accessible at: British Library   View Online
Abstract:
Sophia Jex-Blake (1840-1912) was born in Hastings and died in Rotherfield. She was a pioneer in woman's education and was the first woman to practise as a doctor in Scotland

A Food Poisoning Outbreak at Brighton, by William G. Savage and Duncan Forbes, published October 1918 in Journal of Hygiene (vol. 17, no. 4, article, pp.460-470)   View Online

The Sussex Provident Scheme, published 22 January 1921 in British Medical Journal (1921, vol. 1, article, pp.129-)   Download PDF

The Sussex Provident Scheme: First Year's Working, by Selby, published December 1921 in The Lancet (vol. 198, article, pp.1247-1248)   View Online

The Sussex Provident Scheme, by P. A. S. Crawley and E. C. Baldwin, published March 1923 in The Lancet (vol. 201, article, pp.509-510)   View Online

A Lady Surgeon, 1707, by W. D. Peckham, published November 1929 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. II no. 8, note, p.254) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8951] & The Keep [LIB/500204] & S.A.S. library

Hospital of St. Mary Magdalen, St. Leonards, by J. W. Batterman, published August 1930 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. III no. 3, note, p.91) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8952][Lib 8221] & The Keep [LIB/500205] & S.A.S. library

Bridlington Church and Hospital, by Colonel H. C. Evans, published 1931 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. V no. 4, article, pp.264-267) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2310] & The Keep [LIB/500174]

St Bartholomew's, Winchelsea , by L. F. S. [L. F. Salzman], published May 1931 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. III no. 6, article, p.189) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8952][Lib 8221] & The Keep [LIB/500205] & S.A.S. library

The Pathological Museum at Eastbourne, published 8 August 1931 in British Medical Journal (1931, vol. 2, article, pp.255-)   Download PDF

The Pathological Museum at Eastbourne, published 19 September 1931 in British Medical Journal (1931, vol. 2, article, pp.543-544)   Download PDF

Some recent municipal activities at Brighton, by David Edwards, published 1 August 1932 in Journal of the Royal Sanitary Institute (vol. 53, no. 8, article, pp.411-419)
Discusses sewers, sea defences, roads, town planning,and housing. Written by the Borough Engineer.

Chichester's Mediaeval Hospital, by Mary Cranfield, published 1933 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. VII no. 6, article, pp.387-389) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2312] & The Keep [LIB/500176]

Municipal activities in Brighton during the past twelve years, by R. Baxter and D. Howe, published 1936 in Proceedings of the Institute of Municipal and Corporate Engineers (vol. 63, article, pp.31-76)

The Country Doctor in the 17th and 18th Centuries, by G. Forrester Scott, published 1936 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. X no. 5, article, pp.325-328) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2315][Lib 9331] & The Keep [LIB/500181]

Report on the Fracture line of the Kent and Sussex Hospital, by W. Harvey Gervis, F.R.C.S., published 26 September 1936 in British Medical Journal (1936, vol. 2, article, pp.640-641)   Download PDF

A Sussex Doctor's Card of 1800, by J. B. Caldecott, F.S.A., published February 1938 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. VII no. 1, article, pp.2-5) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 12536][Lib 8864][Lib 2206] & The Keep [LIB/500209] & S.A.S. library

Small-Pox in Wisborough Green, by G. D. Johnston, published February 1941 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. VIII no. 5, article, pp.145-148) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8865][Lib 2207] & The Keep [LIB/500210] & S.A.S. library

St. Mary's Hospital, Chichester, by W. D. P. [W. D. Peckham], published November 1941 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. VIII no. 8, article, pp.207-214) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8865][Lib 2207] & The Keep [LIB/500210] & S.A.S. library

St. Bartholomew's Hospital at Rye, by Leopold A. Vidler, published 1943 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 83, article, pp.73-100) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2168] & The Keep [LIB/500346] & S.A.S. library

An Early Medical Certificate, by E. Cecil Curwen, published August 1943 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. IX no. 7, note, pp.157-158) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8227][Lib 2208] & The Keep [LIB/500211] & S.A.S. library

American Surgical Centre, Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead; the most specialised and up to date in the United Kingdom, by W. J. Banham, published October 1946 in Hospital and Health Management (vol. 9, article, pp.393-398)

Heritage Chailey : craft schools and hospitals, Chailey 1903-1948 : being an account of the pioneer work for crippled children, by Grace Kimmins, published 1948 (123 pp., Baynard Press) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

St. Richard's Hospital, a modern hospital and training school in historic Chichester., published 19 August 1950 in Nursing Times (vol. 46, article, pp.851-854)

A Relic of an 18th Century Isolation Hospital [Binderton], by Francis W Steer, published 1956 (article) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 5319]
From 'The Lancet', 28 Jan 1956

Women Doctors of the World, by Esther Pohl Lovejoy, published 1957 (413 pp., Macmillan)

The Hellingly Hospital Railway, by H. R. Stones, A.M.Inst.T., published December 1957 in Railway Magazine (article, pp.869-872)   Download PDF

The best we can do: an account of the trial of John Bodkin Adams, by Sybille Bedford, published 1958 (254 pp., London: Collins) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The Possessions of a Sussex Surgeon, by Francis W. Steer, published April 1958 in Medical History (vol. 2, issue 2, article, pp.134-136) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 5316]   View Online
Preview:
Inventory, taken on 25 February 1631/2 of William Whighte (or White), a surgeon of Midhurst

Mediaeval Hospitals in Sussex, by Walter H. Godfrey, published 1959 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 97, article, pp.130-136) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2182] & The Keep [LIB/500332] & S.A.S. library

Observations on the Chichester and District Mental Health Service, by John Morrisey, Peter Sainsburg, published 1 December 1959 in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine (vol. 52, no. 12, article, pp.1061-1063)

The Royal West Sussex Hospital: The First Hundred Years, 1784-1884, by Francis W. Steer, F.S.A., published 1960 (Chichester Papers no. 15, Chichester City Council) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

My story of St Dunstan's, by Fraser of Lonsdale, Ian Fraser, published 1961 (London: George G. Harrap & Co.) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Home for blind armed forces personnel, Rottingdean. William Jocelyn Ian Fraser (1897-1974), Baron Fraser, was the Chairman of the home, and had himself been blinded in World War I. He was born, and partly educated in, Eastbourne

Misericords in St Mary's Hospital, Chichester, by Francis W. Steer and G. L. Remnant, published 1962 (Chichester Papers no. 28, Chichester: West Sussex County Council) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16241/8] & West Sussex Libraries

A Cottage Hospital Grows Up - The story of the Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead, by E. J. Dennison, published 1963 (London: Anthony Blond) accessible at: & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Review by M. J. Leppard in Sussex Notes and Queries, November 1963:
This is the story, written by a member of its General Practitioner staff, of the hundred years' existence of the Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead. The hospital has three main claims to fame: it was the fifth cottage hospital to be founded in the country; its Working Men's Hospital Fund, founded in 1903, may possibly be the oldest of its kind in the country; and from its selection at the outbreak of war to be a plastic surgery centre under the late Sir Archibald McIndoe it has grown to be a leading centre for plastic surgery, jaw injuries, dental and ophthalmic surgery, and research.
The author has based his narrative on all surviving records, including the case-book for the first forty cases treated, and newspaper reports, and so has produced a full account, judiciously and readably written, of a not very widely known aspect of county history. Inevitably more modern times are treated more fully and here the rather annalistic account of events and people may be of little interest to people outside the hospital's immediate area; but the details of the taking over by the National Health Service and of what is involved in running a large modern hospital should have a compensating general interest.
Physically the book is very well produced. The only noticeable misprint is on page 22 where "Mr. P. J. P. - the Postmaster" should be Mr. T. J. P.-, i.e. Thomas Jackson Palmer.
It is worth pointing out that East Grinstead has another connection with pioneering work in treating the sick: the foundation in 1854 by the Rev. J. M. Neale of the nursing sisterhood of St. Margaret, the first such order founded in the Church of England. The interesting thing here is that the founder of the Hospital, Dr. J. H. Rogers, was Neale's assistant Warden at Sackville College and also one of his bitterest enemies. One cannot help wondering whether perhaps one of his motives in founding a hospital for the poor was to rival the successful work of Neale's sisterhood. Neither Neale's nor Rogers' surviving papers appear to throw any light on the relation between the two undertakings.

The Hospital of the Blessed Mary, Chichester, by Canon A. C. Powell, published 1966 (booklet, Moore and Tillyer) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 13256] & West Sussex Libraries

Hospital for the Indian war wounded at Brighton, by J. Wright, published November 1968 in Sussex Life (article)

The Hospital of St. Mary and St. Edmund, Wyndham, by Margaret Holt, published May 1969 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XVII no. 3, note, pp.100-101) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8235] & The Keep [LIB/500219] & S.A.S. library

The History of Crowborough War Memorial Hospital 1897-1948, by W. H. Hill, published c.1975 (20 pp., published by the hospital) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries

Incidence of referred mental illness in Chichester and Salisbury., by Jacqueline Grad de Alarcón, Peter Sainsbury, and W. Roy Costain, published 1975 in Psychological Medicine (vol. 5, no. 1, article, pp.32-54)

A History of St John Ambulance, Horsham Division, 1906-1926-1976, by Frank Holmes, published 1976 (pamphlet, West Sussex County Times Ltd.) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 6675] & West Sussex Libraries

The Brighton resuscitation ambulances: a continuing experiment in prehospital care by ambulance staff, published 13 November 1976 in British Medical Journal (1976, vol. 2, article, pp.1161-1165)   Download PDF

Tales of Beachy Head, by S.J. Surtees, published 1978 in Eastbourne Medical Gazette (article, pp.71-78)

The Brighton resuscitation ambulances: review of 40 consecutive survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, by A. F. Mackintosh and others, published 29 April 1978 in British Medical Journal (1978, vol. 1, article, pp.1115-1118)   Download PDF

Hospital resuscitation from ventricular fibrillation in Brighton. , by A. F. Mackintosh and others, published 24 February 1979 in British Medical Journal (1979, vol. 1, article, pp.511-513)   Download PDF

The medical history of Hastings, by C. Allan Birch, published 1980 (unpublished typescript, 267 pp.) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/503825] & East Sussex Libraries

A History of Brighton General Hospital, by Janet Gooch, published 1980 (xi + 177 pp., Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd., ISBN-10: 0850333636 & ISBN-13: 9780850333633) accessible at: & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Horsham Cottage Hospital, 1892-1980, by Frank G. Holmes, published 1980 (pamphlet, 52 pp., published by the author) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7433] & West Sussex Libraries

The Lowdell Family, by Michael J. Burchall, published March 1980 in Sussex Genealogist and Family Historian (vol. 1 no. 4, article, pp.138-145) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 17603] & The Keep [LIB/501187] & CD SXGS from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The Lowdell family has been either settled or connected with Sussex for about 250 years. Their connections with the medical profession is only slightly longer.

The Story of the Lewes Victoria Hospital, by L. S. Davey, published 1981 (17 pp., League of Friends of Lewes Victoria hospital) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502843] & East Sussex Libraries

Suicide and accidental death at Beachy Head, by S.J. Surtees, published 30 January 1982 in British Medical Journal (vol. 284, article, pp.321-324)
During 1965-79 124 deaths occurred at Beachy Head. There was a coroner's verdict of suicide on 58 of these deaths.

Where there's a will: the sensational life of Dr John Bodkin Adams, by Rodney Hallworth and Mark Williams, published 1983 (246 pp., Jersey: Capstan Press, ISBN-10: 0946797005 & ISBN-13: 9780946797004) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Dr William Heneage Legge, by Rosamond Pritchard and John Bleach, published 1983 in Ringmer History (No. 2, article, pp.29-35)
Ringmer doctor from 1887 until his death in 1911.

The Abbreviated History of the Hospital of St Mary's, Chichester, by Brian Tetlow, published September 1983 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 26, article, p.17) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/26] & The Keep [LIB/500480]

University of Sussex Sports Injury Clinic: a report, by J.P. McNaught-Davis and J. Thole, published 1984 in British Journal of Physical Education (article, pp.26-27)

Non-Jurors and Militant Tory High Churchmen in the Medical History of the Dioceses of Chichester and Exeter, by John Wylie and Geoffrey Paley, published December 1984 in Sussex Genealogist and Family Historian (vol. 6 no. 3, article, pp.104-110) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [MP 6277] & The Keep [LIB/501192] & CD SXGS from S.F.H.G.

Easing the passing: the trial of Dr John Bodkin Adams, by Patrick Devlin, published 1985 (256 pp., London: Bodley Head, ISBN-13: 9780370306278) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries

Health Education in West Sussex Schools, by J. Brand, J. French and S. McLaren, published 1985 in Education and Health (vol. 3, no. 4, article)

Sussex Eye Hospital sports injuries, by P.T. Gregory, published 1986 in British Journal of Ophthalmology (vol. 70, no. 10, article, pp.748-750)   Download PDF
To assess the prevalence of sports eye injuries in our area a register was kept over the 18 months from October 1982 to March 1984. Squash, association football, badminton, and tennis were the main offenders. The severest injury was from a golf ball, involving a fractured zygoma. There was one retinal dialysis, and one lens dislocation requiring extraction. Spectacles were broken in six cases and a contact lens in one. Glass fragments needed operative removal in one case, but there were no penetrating injuries. The value of eye protection, not worn by any of our patients, is emphasised.

Private nursing homes: contribution to long stay care of the elderly in the Brighton Health District. , by J. Bennett, published 4 October 1986 in British Medical Journal (vol. 293, article, pp.867-870)   Download PDF

St Mary's Hospital, Chichester: A Short History and Guide, by Julian Munby, published 1987 (pamphlet, Hospital Trustees & printed at Leeds: W. S. Maney) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9793] & West Sussex Libraries

Sussex Apothecaries' Tokens and their Issuers, by T. Douglas Whittet, published May 1987 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 37, article, p.1) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/37] & The Keep [LIB/500482]

Red Herrings: Some 17th Century Prescriptions, by Janet Pennington, published May 1987 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 37, article, pp.9-17) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/37] & The Keep [LIB/500482]

Lung function in West Sussex firemen: a four year study, by K. Horsfield, A.R. Guyatt, Fiona M. Cooper and Maureen P. Buckman, published 1988 in British Journal of Industrial Medicine (vol. 45, no. 2, article, pp.116-121)   Download PDF

Respiratory symptoms in West Sussex firemen, by K. Horsfield, published 1988 in British Journal of Industrial Medicine (vol. 45, no. 4, article, pp.251-255)   Download PDF

Three Cheers for Yoga! A Brighton Experiment in Adult Education for the Mentally Handicapped, by Vivien Martin, published 1988 in Adult Education (vol. 60, no. 4, article, pp.314-321)

Images in the Fire, by Tony Whitehead, published 1 July 1988 (118 pp., Brighton: Brighton Department of Psychiatry for the Elderly, ISBN-10: 0951334107 & ISBN-13: 9780951334102) accessible at: British Library

A history of the Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead, by J. P. Bennett, published July 1988 in British Journal of Plastic Surgery (vol. 41, issue 4, article, pp.422-449)   View Online

Nicholas Culpeper (1616-1654) and The Complete Herbal, by Ronald Tibble, published September 1988 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 8 no. 3, article, pp.128-136) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 10736] & The Keep [LIB/501260] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The life of Nicholas Culpeper and a discussion of herbal medicine.

Hellingly Hospital Railway, by Peter A. Harding, published 1 April 1989 (32 pp., published by the author, ISBN-10: 095094145X & ISBN-13: 9780950941455) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries

Octavia Wilberforce: The Autobiography of a Pioneer Woman Doctor, edited by Pat Jalland, published 11 May 1989 (192 pp., Weidenfeld Nicolson Illustrated, ISBN-10: 030432230X & ISBN-13: 9780304322305) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 11746]

The Cemetery of the Hospital of St James and St Mary Magdalene, Chichester: a case study , by Frances Lee and John Magilton, published October 1989 in World Archaeology (vol. 21, no. 2, article, pp.273-282)

The auditory ossicles in human skeletal remains from a leper cemetery in Chichester, England, by T.D. Brunitje, published 1990 in Journal of Archaeological Science (vol. 17, no. 6, article, pp.627-633)

Foredown Isolation Hospital, by Hugh Fermer, published 1990 in Sussex Industrial History (issue no. 20, article, pp.15-34, ISSN: 0263-5151) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/506526]   Download PDF
Abstract:
In the late nineteenth century, infectious diseases were extremely common. Some diseases like scarlet fever and diphtheria, which in these days are rarely heard of, claimed many lives particularly children. Typhoid fever was not unknown and even smallpox was frequently diagnosed. During the late 1860's and 1870's an influential body of opinion in Hove, brought to the attention of the Hove Commissioners (Hove was not yet a Borough Council) the advantages of having an Isolation hospital for Hove, so that patients with infectious diseases if they were Hove residents, need not be sent outside the district to be treated.
After the usual delays and problems, many of which were connected with finances, a loan was arranged with the Local Government Board, and work started in 1881.
The site which was chosen was a 6½ acre plot about one mile north of Portslade village and five hundred yards north of the disused windmill and the old smithy. It stands on the highest point of the ridge which runs north to Foredown Hill. It was considered that the site was isolated enough from the town to preclude risk of infection and high enough to allow fresh clean air to be part of the cure. It was also only a relatively short journey by horse transport from Hove and Portslade which avoided long journeys for sick people being admitted.
It was part of the deal with the Local Government Board, that patients from Shoreham Local Board, and Steyning Union Rural Sanitary Authority, should be offered treatment at the new hospital.

Southlands: Workhouse and Hospital, by Rev. John White, published 28 June 1990 (League of Friends of Southlands Hospital) accessible at: Southwick Society & West Sussex Libraries

Cuckfield Hospital, by Seonaid Collins, published June 1990 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 9 no. 2, article, pp.43-49) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 11999] & The Keep [LIB/501261] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The story of Cuckfield Hospital - the purchase in 1840 of lands known as Hylands to form the Cuckfield Union Workhouse, by WWI known as the Cuckfield Poor Law Institution, in 1928 known as the West Hylands Institution, in 1939 as the Emergency Medical Service Hospital, in 1942 the hospital was taken over by the Canadian Medical Unit and in 1949 as Cuckfield Hospital part of the National Health Service.

Early 19th Century Medical Prescriptions found in Chichester, by John Price, published October 1991 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 48, article, p.17) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/48] & The Keep [LIB/500483]

Barracks, Workhouse and Hospital: St. Mary's Eastbourne, 1794-1990, by John Surtees, published 1 January 1992 (160 pp., Eastbourne Local History Society, ISBN-10: 0950456047 & ISBN-13: 9780950456041) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

The Pest House, by Douglas Rudwick, published July 1992 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 4 Number 4, article, pp.35-38, Summer 1992) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15967]
Abstract:
The story of the Midhurst Pest House, founded in the 1740s, and its subsequent division into 4 tenements in the late 1800s.

Sophia Jex-Blake: A Woman Pioneer in Nineteenth Century Medical Reform, by Shirley Roberts, published 21 October 1993 (The Wellcome Institute series in the history of medicine, x + 207 pp., London: Routledge, ISBN-10: 0415087538 & ISBN-13: 9780415087537) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Sophia Jex-Blake (1840-1912) was born in Hastings and died in Rotherfield. She led the campaign that won for British women the right to enter the medical profession. Before taking up this cause she had studied women's education in England, Germany and the United states, and rejected the popular contemporary view that higher education would be wasted on women. Her medical crusade in Britain resulted in women's rights to professional careers and financial independence being more widely accepted.
After years of extensive lobbying, she founded the London School of Medicine for Women in 1874 and two years later, largely due to her efforts, legislation was passed enabling women to take qualifying examinations in medicine. Shirley Roberts shows Sophia Jex-Blake to have been a determined and resourceful pioneer, skilful in winning over both public and political opinion. But she was also an impetuous and at times tactless woman, who could provoke hostility, as well as loyalty. Sophia Jex-Blake is a fascinating account of one woman's struggle for equality.

The Princess Alice Memorial Hospital, Eastbourne and other Eastbourne hospitals, by John Surtees, published 1 November 1993 (244 pp., Eastbourne Local History Society, ISBN-10: 0950456055 & ISBN-13: 9780950456058) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

John Forbes (1787-1861), in memoriam: from Cuttlebrae to Whitchurch, by R. A. L. Agnew, published 1994 (article) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 12707]

William King (1786-1865): Physician and Father of the Co-Operative Movement, by John Grenville Corina, published August 1994 in The Journal of Medical Biography (vol. 2, no 3, article, pp.168-176)   View Online

The Wakehurst Connection, by Thea Valentine, published October 1994 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 7 Number 1, article, pp.22-27, Autumn 1994) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15968]
Abstract:
Nicholas Culpeper, 17th century herbalist, and his links to Wakehurst Place, Ardingly.

Sir John Forbes (1787-1861), by R A L Agnew, published 1995 in Medical Historian (vol. 8, article, pp.38-45) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 13386]

Inflammatory bone changes in leprous skeletons from the medieval hospital of St. James and St. Mary Magdalene, Chichester, England, by Mary E. Lewis, Charlotte A. Roberts, and Keith Manchester, published 1995 in International Journal of Leprosy and Other Mycobacterial Diseases (vol. 63, article, pp.77-77)

Brighton General Hospital and Warren Farm School, by Ron Martin, published 1995 in Sussex Industrial History (issue no. 25, article, pp.25-28, ISSN: 0263-5151) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/506527]   Download PDF
Abstract:
The 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act advocated the formation of unions at several parishes to operate efficient new workhouses. The Brighton Guardians had already built a new workhouse only twelve years before, located above St. Nicholas' churchyard to the north of Church Street (TQ 307047). For this reason Brighton was the only parish in East Sussex not to conform to the pattern of joining a union to carry out the policy of the New Poor Law. However by the late 1840s the existing workhouse was found to be inadequate and the Guardians decided to build a larger one and also an industrial school. The latter was built in 1859 to the designs of George Maynard, the parish surveyor, on the land occupied by Wick Farm (TQ 351056). It comprised a two storied E-shaped block fronting onto Warren Road, the central seven bays and the central wing behind being three stories high. The design is plain with rendered walls and a hipped slate covered roof and mainly casement windows with mullions and transoms.
The school which was known as the Warren Farm Industrial Schools ceased its original function and became a children's home in the 1930s and subsequently had various other uses. In about 1955 it became the Fitzherbert R.C. Secondary School and was finally closed in 1987. It was proposed that it would become one of the new City Technology Colleges but this came to nothing and the buildings were finally demolished in 1994. Currently a Nuffield Hospital is being erected on the site.
In 1866 the Brighton Workhouse was built in Elm Grove (TQ 328052) on a seven acre site to the designs of George Maynard. The buildings erected at that time comprised the Workhouse proper (A Block, now Arundel building), Casual Wards adjacent to the main entrance (now demolished), the Infirmary (F Block, now Fletching Wards), Workhouse Nursery (G Block, now Glynde Building), Lunatic Wards (H Block, now Hollingbury Building), Fever and Foul Wards (probably J,K or L Blocks, now Jevington Building, Keymer Building and Lancing Building), together with a complete range of service buildings. Most of these buildings survive to this day but have been changed from their original use in many cases.

Doctor Brighton: Richard Russell and the sea water cure, by Alex Sakula, published February 1995 in The Journal of Medical Biography (vol. 3, no 1, article, pp.30-33)   View Online

Memories of Rye, Winchelsea and District Memorial Hospital, edited by Jo Kirkham, published 1 August 1995 (Rye Memories, 132 pp., Thomas Peacocke Community College, Local History Group, ISBN-10: 187060024X & ISBN-13: 9781870600248) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

A Dictionary of Sussex Folk Medicine, by Dr. Andrew Allen, published 1 September 1995 (192 pp., Berkshire: Countryside Books, ISBN-10: 1853063665 & ISBN-13: 9781853063664) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

More early 19th century medical prescriptions found in Chichester, by John Price, published October 1995 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 56, article, p.5) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/56] & The Keep [LIB/500484]

Dr Burn's Casebook, by B.A. White, published October 1995 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 56, article, p.27) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/56] & The Keep [LIB/500484]

The methodology of a major survey of visual impairment in East and West Sussex, by Gill MacDonagh, published 1 November 1995 in British Journal of Visual Impairment (vol. 13, no. 3, article, pp.114-118)
Over an 18 month period centred on 1993 a major survey was undertaken to investigate the condition of blind and visually impaired (Vl) children and young adults (0-25 years) in East and West Sussex. Its brief was to ascertain the Educational Needs of the surveyed group with a view to addressing some of these with funding from the Blatchington Court Trust which com missioned the work. Accordingly the brief included recommendations on how funding might be apportioned and utilised in the medium-term. In many ways this was a 'first of its kind' and, as such, is worth recording to aid in the undertaking of future works of similarly ambitious complexity, depth and breadth. The survey's Director Gill MacDonagh reports on its methodology as a preface to two major articles on the contents of the survey.

More 18th Century Family (Medical) History, by Roland Waters, published March 1996 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 12 no. 1, article, p.24) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14879] & The Keep [LIB/501165] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Doctor Miller of Newick made large claims for the efficacy on his 'Medicine' in 1796.

A Cottage Hospital Grows Up - The story of the Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead, by E. J. Dennison, published 30 June 1996 (2nd revised edition, 304 pp., Baxendale Press, ISBN-10: 0952093391 & ISBN-13: 9780952093398) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

The Sherburne Hospital, Chichester, published 1997 (pamphlet, Sherburne Hospital) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 13577]

Dr Brighton's Indian Patients December 1914-January 1916, by Joyce Collins, published 1997 (33 pp., Brighton: Brighton Books Publishing, ISBN-13: 9781901454017) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502506] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The Queen Alexandra Hospital Home, by David S Farrant, published 1997 (144 pp., Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd., ISBN-10: 186077055X & ISBN-13: 9781860770555) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14983] & West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
The Queen Alexandra Hospital Home is a remarkable institution with an inspiring history. Casualties in the First World War reached appalling numbers and the Home cared for those who were permanently disabled. The vision of Gladys, Marchioness of Ripon, the Home was founded in 1919 in Roehampton through the generosity of the Charrington family. An outstanding story of voluntary effort, as people from all walks of life rallied round, including the royal family, and, in particular, Mrs. Verena Hay, who devoted over 30 years to bringing her friend Lady Ripon's vision to reality.

Out of the Shadows, A History of Newhaven Downs 1836-1996 , by Harry Gaston, published 1997 (South Downs Health NHS Trust) accessible at: The Keep [HB/3/172/1] & West Sussex Libraries

The Doctors of Pulborough, 1731-1997, by D. W. Morris, published 1997 (pamphlet, published by the author) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 13613] & West Sussex Libraries

Sussex Medical Men in 1839 (Apothecaries, Chemists, Dentists, Physicians, Surgeons, Veterinarians, etc.), by Ronald F. Newman, published March 1997 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 12 no. 5, article, pp.176-179) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14879] & The Keep [LIB/508812] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Extract from Pigot & Co. Directory of 1839

1948-1998 NHS Fifty in West Sussex, published 1998 (West Sussex Health Authority) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 13797]

St Barnabas' Hospice, Worthing: A History, by David Farrant, published 1998 (72 pp., Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd., ISBN-10: 0850339715 & ISBN-13: 9780850339710) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14984] & West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
The hospice was a new concept when it opened in 1973. The inspiration of Dr. Francis Gusterson, it was one of the first three to be built in Britain. Persevering in the face of difficulties that would have daunted most, Dr. Gusterson's strong Christian faith shone through all that he did and the people of Worthing rallied to his cause with hard work and generosity.

Bevendean Isolation Hospital, Brighton, by Hugh Fermer with a postscript by Pat Bracher, published 1998 in Sussex Industrial History (issue no. 28, article, pp.19-26, ISSN: 0263-5151) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/506527]   Download PDF
Abstract:
The story of Bevendean Hospital, originally called the Brighton Sanatorium, began early in 1881. A letter from the Workhouse Master at Elm Grove dated early in 1881, informed the Sanitary Committee of Brighton Corporation that there was a depressing need for more accommodation for smallpox victims. There were, he said, only five places now available at Elm Grove. This was repeated in a further letter to the Committee in May 1881. On 31 May 1881 the Sanitary Committee resolved that 'The Surveyor do forthwith erect a temporary building to be used as a sanatorium on part of the land acquired by the council as a site for such an establishment.' This resolution went on to say that wards were to be fitted up for not less than forty patients and requested the Medical Officer of Health to report on the staff that he required.
The site referred to in the Sanitary Committee resolution was on the Downs at the back of the town. It was ten acres in extent and 326 feet above sea level and it sloped towards the west and south in the direction of the sea. It was acquired by the Corporation in 1881 for £5,000 subject to restrictions preventing the Corporation from erecting buildings for the infectious sick except on a limited portion of the site.
. . .
The hospital closed on 24 April 1989. The ten acre site was to be sold and the proceeds spent on the new hospital at Hove and a new ward at the Royal Sussex Hospital. The last part of the hospital to close was Willow Ward, the day ward for psycho-geriatrics which was to remain open until a new home for it was found in September 1990. The site was bought by Croudace Housing who planned to build 128 houses and demolition began in April 1993. Nothing is now left of the hospital except the high flint wall which marks the boundary of the housing estate.

Building review: the revolutionary East Sussex hospital for the elderly that is improving its patients quality of life, published 23 October 1998 in Building (article, pp.36-43)

St Richard's Hospital and the NHS: An Oral History, by Chris Howard Bailey, published 1 December 1998 (208 pp., Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd., ISBN-10: 1860770681 & ISBN-13: 9781860770685) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

Mary Sophia Honor, by Mrs. Dee Monnery, published December 1998 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 13 no. 4, article, pp.136-137) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14880] & The Keep [LIB/508819] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Paupers in the Matter of Lunacy as occurred with Mary Sophia Honor at the West Sussex County Asylum in 1912

An 18th Century Doctor in Sussex; and some more Family (Medical) History, by Roland Waters, published December 1998 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 13 no. 4, article, pp.139-140) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14880] & The Keep [LIB/508819] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Dr. Brodrum's Botanical Syrup

Sweet Bells Jangled Out of Tune: A History of the Sussex Lunatic Asylum (St. Francis Hospital) Haywards Heath, by James Gardner, published August 1999 (321 pp., published by the author, ISBN-10: 0953610101 & ISBN-13: 9780953610105) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 18269] & The Keep [LIB/502169] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Care of the sick and elderly in Chichester since 1400 , by Neville Oswald, published October 1999 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 64, article, p.30) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/64] & The Keep [LIB/500488]

The strange case of Dr John Bodkin Adams and the views of those who knew him, by John Surtees, published 2000 (176 pp., Seaford: S.B., ISBN-10: 1857701089 & ISBN-13: 9781857701081) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

St. Helen's Hospital, Hastings (1837-1994) "Paupers to Pacemakers", by Don Valentine and others, published 2000 (80 pp., Rosewell Publishing, ISBN-10: 0953790126 & ISBN-13: 9780953790128) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

The King's Sanatorium, by F J-D [Mrs D.V.F Johnson-Davies], published July 2000 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 12 Number 4, article, pp.16-23, Summer 2000) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15969]
Abstract:
History, with illustrations, of the King Edward V11 Hospital, founded in 1903 as a Royal Charter charity hospital, and opened in 1906. The hospital closed in 2006.

St Mary's Hospital, Chichester, by Thea Valentine, published July 2000 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 12 Number 4, article, pp.30-31, Summer 2000) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15969]
Abstract:
Brief history, with illustration, of the Hospital, which originated c.1158.

Catalogue of the Library of Sir John Forbes (1787-1861): Part 1, Some General Works, by Robin A. L. Agnew, published 2001 (article) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14510]

Blackbushe - A Pest House, by Mrs. Vicki Smith, published March 2001 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 14 no. 5, article, pp.186-188) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14881] & The Keep [LIB/508823] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
Blackbushe House is a cottage on the top of Bow Hill, near Binderton, a few miles north of Chichester and was used for inoculation against smallpox during the period 1752 to 1781. Over 30 names and initials survive on carvings in the house.

A Quiet Revolution in Brighton: Dr Helen Boyle's Pioneering Approach to Mental Health Care, 1899-1939, by Louise Westwood, published December 2001 in Social History of Medicine (vol. 14, issue 3, article, pp.439-457) accessible at: British Library   View Online
Abstract:
At the close of the nineteenth century, the English lunacy laws in relation to pauper cases made no concessions for acute, temporary, or recoverable cases. They were all located in the asylum along with severe and chronic cases. Dr Helen Boyle worked among London's poor in the 1890s and observed the deterioration of cases of nervous disorder and borderline insanity due to their lack of treatment. The early treatment of borderline cases was the aim of Boyle's charitable hospital, founded in 1905, for nervous disorders in women and girls. Boyle's interest in mental disorder included the mentally defective and she was a founder member of the Guardianship Society which sought to keep those defined as such within the community. The history of the care and treatment of the 'insane' has concentrated largely on the public and private asylums. London-based facilities such as the Tavistock clinic and the Maudsley Hospital, which both treated rate-aided patients in the interwar period, have been given a great deal of attention because of wealthy benefactors and the involvement of high profile individuals. Boyle's unique in-patient facility in Brighton preceded the Maudsley by almost 20 years and as such fills an important gap in mental health history. Boyle's work challenged the lunacy laws and set out to establish a holistic system of care for recoverable conditions outside the asylum system. This essay concentrates on the work of Dr Helen Boyle in Brighton but also highlights other facilities that were available for rate-aided patients, which have been neglected in the historiography of mental health care.

Report on the History of the Hellingly Hospital Site, by Gillian Hesselgrave, published 2002 (17 pp., Hellingly Community Park Trust) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/501310] & East Sussex Libraries

Life of Sir John Forbes (1787-1861), Royal Physician, Medical Journalist and Translator of Laennec - a Victorian Polymath, by R. A. L. Agnew, published June 2002 (82 pp., Bernard Durnford Publishing, ISBN-10: 0953567079 & ISBN-13: 9780953567072) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

Dr John Bayly (1735-1815): Revisiting the Chichester Physician, by Barbara Stewert Ely, published Spring 2003 in West Sussex History, the Journal of West Sussex Archives Society (no. 71, article, p.13) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16404/71] & The Keep [LIB/500495]

Seeing beyond adversity: St Dunstan's is a charity that helps blind ex-service men and women to live independently. Daniel Allen paid a visit, by Daniel Allen, published 2004 in Nursing older people (vol. 16, no. 8, article, pp.10-12)
St Dunstan's at Ovindean, now part of Blind Veterans UK

Injecting drug use in Brighton, Liverpool, and London: best estimates of prevalence and coverage of public health indicators, by Matthew Hickman, Vanessa Higgins, Vivian Hope, Mark Bellis, Kate Tilling, Angeline Walker and John Henry, published September 2004 in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (vol. 58, no. 9, article, pp.766-771)

An edition of the English texts in British Library MS Sloane 3285, Practical medicine, Sussex dialect and the London Associations of a fifteenth century book , by Maria Helena Loen-Marshall, 2005 at Glasgow University (Ph.D. thesis)   View Online
Abstract:
This thesis is an edition of the English texts in British Library MS Sloane 3285, an important fifteenth century medical collection, hitherto unpublished. After an introductory preface, the thesis consists of five chapters, followed by the text, notes and a glossary. Non English items are presented in appendices. Chapter 1 offers a description of the book's make-up, and gives an account of its place within the Sloane collection. This chapter includes a paleographical discussion of various hands in the manuscript. Chapter 2 discusses the language of the different hands. Chapter 3 places the contents of texts in relation to medieval medical practice and theory. This chapter also offers an outline of the various traditions that lie behind these texts. Chapter 4 discusses the medieval provenance of the manuscript and relates it to its intellectual milieu. Chapter 5 outlines the editorial practice of the edition. An edition of the texts then follows, edited on conservative principles as outlined in chapter 5. The intention of this thesis is to reconstruct the mental landscape that informed the creation of this remarkable medieval artefact.

Prevention of suicide by jumping: The impact of restriction of access at Beachy Head, Sussex during the foot and mouth crisis 2001, by M. Isaac and J. Bennett, published 2005 in Public Health Medicine (vol. 6, no. 1, article, pp.19-22)

'MMR talk' and vaccination choices: an ethnographic study in Brighton, by Mike Poltorak, Melissa Leach and James Fairhead, published 2005 in Social Science and Medicine (vol. 61, no. 3, article, pp.709-719)

A stranger in blood: the case files on Dr John Bodkin Adams, by Pamela V. Halliday Cullen, published 2006 (687 pp., London: Elliot & Thompson, ISBN-10: 1904027199 & ISBN-13: 9781904027195) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

What do clinicians want from us? An evaluation of Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust clinical librarian service and its implications for developing futureworking patterns, by Amanda Brookman, published 2006 in Health Information and Libraries Journal (vol. 23, no. 1, article, pp.10-21)

A coordinated response to the high drug death rate in Brighton & Hove, by Jennifer Bennett, Graham Stevens, Angeline Walker, Hugh Williams, Andy Winter, Veronica Hamilton-Deeley, published 1 September 2006 in Probation Journal (vol. 53, no. 3, article, pp.265-277)
Concern about the increasing number of drug related deaths in Brighton & Hove prompted a Confidential Inquiry into 69 deaths. This led to recommendations concerning better data collection, identifying vulnerable populations, improving responses to overdose, and modifying service organization. Heroin-related deaths were halved between 2000 and 2003, but the rate for total drug deaths remained the highest at 25.3 per 100,000 (2003) in participating coroners' jurisdictions. In a subsequent Capture Recapture study, the prevalence of intravenous drug use in Brighton & Hove was estimated at 2 per cent of people aged 15-44, higher than Liverpool or London. The proportion of opiate drug users dying from opiate overdose was also highest in Brighton & Hove, at 2.1 per cent. A network of interlocking services was established within strong multi-agency partnerships, supplemented by: increasing the numbers in treatment; fast tracking hospital discharges and prison releases into treatment; new specialist posts in the local prison, the accident and emergency department and police custody suite; and participation by pharmacists and primary care services. This was underpinned by good liaison with the coroner.

Women's Hospitals in Brighton and Hove: The Story of The Lady Chichester Hospital and The New Sussex Hospital, by Val Brown, published 1 October 2006 (Hastings Press, ISBN-10: 1904109098 & ISBN-13: 9781904109099) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502165] & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
In 1898 two young women doctors arrived in Hove and nervously set up in general practice. Twenty eventful years later Brighton & Hove had two women's hospitals. This book is a unique blend of social and local history set against a vivid backdrop of Edwardian Brighton, World War I, and the struggle for women to forge a place in public life.

The Grellier twins, Norman (1886-1949) and Bernard (1886-1957), radiologists of East Sussex., by Ian J. Kenedy, published February 2007 in The Journal of Medical Biography (vol. 15, no. 1, article, pp.53-58)   View Online
Abstract:
Identical twins Bernard and Norman Grellier (born Epsom, 1886) attended Epsom College before entering Dental School at the Royal Dental Hospital of London in 1904, graduating in 1910. Then they trained in medicine at Charing Cross Hospital. Bernard graduated in 1913 and Norman in 1915. In 1915 they joined the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC), serving to the end of World War I (WWI), each being awarded the Military Cross for gallantry. After WWI, they trained as radiologists and moved to St Leonards-on-Sea in West Sussex, taking up Consultant posts at the Royal East Sussex Hospital and the Municipal Hospital in Hastings, and the Eversfield Chest Hospital in St Leonards. In 1940 they rejoined the RAMC as radiologists, serving throughout World War II. They remained unmarried, devoted to each other, to their practice and to their loves of model engineering and flying, the latter nearly causing their deaths in an air crash in 1936.

The Queen Alexandra Hospital Home: A History, by David Farrant, published 1 February 2008 (160 pp., Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd., ISBN-10: 1860775187 & ISBN-13: 9781860775185) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
The Queen Alexandra Hospital Home is a remarkable institution with an inspiring history. Casualties in the First World War reached appalling numbers and the Book tells how the home cared for those who were permanently disabled. The vision of Gladys Marchioness of Ripon, the Home was founded in 1919 in Roehampton through the generosity of the Charrington family. In an outstanding story of voluntary effort, people from all walks of life rallied round to help, including the royal family and, in particular, Mrs Verena Hay, who devoted over thirty years of her life to bringing her friend Lady Ripon's vision to reality. The Home pioneered medical and social care procedures which are taken for granted today. The first steps in physiotherapy and occupational therapy were followed by helping the patients to retrain and to find employment. There are wonderful stories of the courage and cheerfulness of individual patients, whose lives were restored and enriched by the devotion of many volunteers. The move to Worthing in 1933 was achieved in spite of bureaucratic obstacles and some local opposition, though the residents soon took 'the Boys' to their hearts. Vital support came from the British Red Cross Society, the Order of St John and the 8th Duke of Richmond as well as military and other charities. Operating with a deficit nearly every year of its existence led to energetic financial planning and the support of benefactors always made the difference between success and failure. This powerful story will appeal to many readers who have barely heard of 'Gifford House', as it is more usually called these days; while for all who knew the institution or whose relatives were cared for in the Home the story will be fascinating.

Herbert Aldersmith (1847-1918): Christ's Hospital medical officer and co-founder of the Medical Officers of Schools Association, by Trevor Hoskins, published February 2008 in The Journal of Medical Biography (vol. 16, no. 1, article, pp.36-43)   View Online
Abstract:
Herbert Aldersmith spent his entire working life, from the age of 23 years until his retirement at 65 years, as Resident Medical Officer to Christ's Hospital School. It was a crucial period in the school's history, from the overdue reforms of the late Victorian era to its historic move from the City of London to Sussex in 1902. He became an acknowledged authority on ringworm and also published extensively on the other great interest of his life, the British-Israel Society. He was the prime mover in founding the first-ever professional association of school doctors in 1884.

Brighton's County Hospital, 1828-2007, by Harry Gaston, published 11 June 2008 (289 pp., Newhaven: Southern Editorial Services, ISBN-10: 0955846706 & ISBN-13: 9780955846700) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502162] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Brighton's County Hospital describes the development of the hospital, its patients and the people who worked in it from its early years until the present day. Some of the high (and low) points along the way include the bravery of staff during the fire on New Year's Day in 1872 that threatened to destroy the hospital, the rivalry between physicians and surgeons revealed at the Sussex Assizes in 1908, the financial crisis of 1922 that almost closed 100 beds, the dangerous operation to remove a live shell from a sailor's thigh during the Second World War and the way staff dealt with the aftermath of the IRA bombing of Brighton's Grand Hotel in 1984. Brighton's County Hospital contains more than 160 photographs. The Foreword is provided by Baroness Cumberlege, a former chairman of Brighton Health Authority and former junior health minister.

Friends of the Hospital: A History of Volunteering at Horsham Hospital 1892-2009, by David Briffett, published 27 February 2009 (132 pp., League of Friends of Horsham Hospital, ISBN-10: 0951517023 & ISBN-13: 9780951517024) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries

The Alex Story: A Portrait of Brighton's Children's Hospital, by Harry Gaston, published 27 February 2009 (128 pp, Newhaven: Southern Editorial Services, ISBN-10: 0955846714 & ISBN-13: 9780955846717) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502161][Lib/507945] & British Library & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
In August 1868, one of England s earliest children s hospitals opened in two or three rooms in a property Western Road in Brighton. From this modest beginning emerged what was arguably to become the town s best-loved hospital, the royal Alexandra hospital for Sick Children. Certainly the news that the building it eventually occupied in Dyke Road was to be replaced with a brand new building on the Royal Sussex County Hospital site was not greeted with universal approval. Indeed, a campaign was launched to convert doubting parents and some hospital staff of the necessity for change. Using pictures and material from hospital archives and a range of other sources including former patients and members of staff, this book charts the development of the Alex as it was affectionately known, from its humble beginnings to become one of the country s leading children s hospitals and its eventual closure in 2007.

A Lingering Fear: East Sussex Hospitals and the Workhouse Legacy, by Harry Gaston, published 17 November 2009 (247 pp., Newhaven: Southern Editorial Services, ISBN-10: 0955846722 & ISBN-13: 9780955846724) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502160] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
They are not taking me to the workhouse are they? That was the fear of many elderly people who were being admitted to hospital through much of the twentieth century. A Lingering Fear shows what life was like in the 1930s and 40s in eight Sussex institutions Stone House at Battle, Hastings, Eastbourne, Brighton, Shoreham, Newhaven, Chailey and Cuckfield. These were the years when inmates daily lives were frequently governed by former workhouse masters and matrons, when tramps queued at the gates for admission, when many of the onerous tasks for inmates from workhouse days continued, and misdemeanours could lead to seven days hard labour in prison. Much of this changed after 1948 when seven of these institutions became NHS hospitals in East Sussex Battle, St Helen s at Hastings, St Mary s in Eastbourne, Brighton General, Newhaven Downs, Pouchlands and Cuckfield. But the care of their older patients continued to be affected by their workhouse origins and it was not until 2008 that the final patient was discharged from the last remaining hospital. The fear of the workhouse is now a thing of the past. But A Lingering Fear helps to explain why even today older people are sometimes neglected and suffer from a lack of care and respect in Britain s hospitals.

The medieval hospital of St Nicholas, Lewes, East Sussex: excavations 1994, by Luke Barber and Lucy Sibun, published 2010 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 148, article, pp.79-110) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 18613] & The Keep [LIB/500366] & S.A.S. library   View Online
Abstract:
During the spring/summer of 1994 excavations were undertaken at the former site of the medieval hospital of St Nicholas, Lewes, East Sussex prior to redevelopment works. Two areas were excavated but little structural evidence for the hospital buildings was located. One area revealed part of the hospital cemetery and 103 burials were excavated. Also within this area were two large quarries thought to have been dug during a construction phase at the hospital, probably in the twelfth century. The second area contained yet another quarry, used for the disposal of large quantities of domestic refuse, particularly pottery, in the early thirteenth century. This area also contained the remains of a sill wall for a timber-framed building, which may have served the hospital.

The history of the hospital of St Nicholas, Lewes and its successors, by Christopher Whittick, published 2010 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 148, article, pp.111-128) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 18613] & The Keep [LIB/500366] & S.A.S. library   View Online
Abstract:
Although there is little direct evidence for the hospital in the medieval period, it featured in accounts of the battle of Lewes and as a landmark. Its usefulness enabled it to survive the dissolution of Lewes Priory, its patron house, and it was gradually appropriated by the authorities of the parish of St Anne, while maintaining an independent charitable status which ensured its exemption from the Poor Law Amendment Act in 1834. Featuring on maps of Lewes from 1618 onwards, its importance was recognised as early as the 1770s by an antiquary who commissioned drawings of the ruins. Redevelopment of the site began in 1867, and the erection of a school in 1910 produced further images in the form of architects' drawings and photographs. This article can be read as a pendant to the excavation report (for which it was originally commissioned - see this volume pp. 79-109) or as a piece of free-standing research, which should nonetheless inform any future archaeological investigation of the site.

Doctors, Dentists & Death: West Sussex Health Issues since the 19th century, by Barrie Keech, published 2011 (Chichester: West Sussex County Council, ISBN-10: 0862605857 & ISBN-13: 9780862605858) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

An evaluation of the experience of integrated GP training placements in the Kent, Surrey and Sussex Deanery, by Richard Griffin, Abdol Tavabie and Ian Maclean, published 2011 in Education for Primary Care (vol. 22, no. 2, article, pp.74-82)

"The Maestro": a pioneering plastic surgeon - Sir Archibald McIndoe and his innovating work on patients with burn injury during World War II., by Menedimos Geomelas, Mojtaba Ghods, Andrej Ring and Christian Ottoman, published May 2011 in Journal of Burn Care & Research (vol. 32, issue. 3, article, pp.363-368)   View Online
This article describes McIndoe's revolutionary methods of burn treatment and rehabilitation of patients with burn injury and outlines his personality traits that made him one of the most important plastic surgeons of the twentieth century. As a consultant plastic surgeon to the Royal Air Force, he set up a plastic surgery unit in the Queen Victoria Hospital in East Grinstead. By using biographical data and photography, McIndoe's work on burns treatment and the challenges he faced are presented. Before World War II, little was known about the treatment of severe burns and their complications, and even less was done about the rehabilitation and social reintegration of patients with burn injury. McIndoe changed all that by developing new techniques for the management and reconstruction of burn injuries. He helped his patients become and get accepted as a normal part of society again. The patients with burn injury treated by him formed the Guinea Pig Club. Sir Archibald Hector McIndoe, a charismatic plastic surgeon with an uncanny instinctive knowledge of psychology, recognized early that the rehabilitation of a burned patient was as important as the reconstruction of his physical body. His therapeutic approach to patients with burn injury was mental and physical.

Brighton Born, Sussex Bred: The Story of Brighton's Maternity Hospitals 1830-2007 , by Harry Gaston, published 20 September 2011 (156 pp., Newhaven: Southern Editorial Services, ISBN-10: 0955846730 & ISBN-13: 9780955846731) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502167] & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
A hundred years ago a dozen women died in childbirth every day. Hospitals were especially dangerous places, so many women succumbing to childbed fever (later called puerperal sepsis) usually transmitted by a midwife or obstetrician. No wonder that the original Sussex Maternity Hospital did not actually admit women, preferring to send midwives to deliver them in their own homes. Today, its successor hospital, the Royal Sussex County, deals with the vast majority of confinement in the city. Brighton Born, Sussex Bred tells how this change took place. Tracing the history of the maternity wards on three Brighton hospitals it shows how hospitals have become the preferred choice for many women, while at the same time providing the services of midwives to women who choose a home birth. The change from the days of Dickens Sarah Gamp and the old workhouses is to be expected. But what will surprise many readers are the changes that have taken place in living memory so vividly illustrated by the reminiscences of thirty local midwives and mothers from the 1950s and 60s that are included in the book.

"British India on trial": Brighton Military Hospitals and the politics of empire in World War I, by Samuel Hyson and Alan Lester, published January 2012 in Journal of Historical Geography (vol. 38, no. 1, article, pp.18-34)

The Royal West Sussex Hospital, 1784-1995, by Martin Cooke, published 1 July 2012 (New Chichester papers, no. 3, 28 pp., Chichester Local History Society & printed at University of Chichester, ISBN-10: 1907852131 & ISBN-13: 9781907852138) accessible at: Chichester Local History Society & West Sussex Libraries

Celebrating the Centenary of the Founding of Riposo Health Hydro in Hastings 1912-1962-2012: Fifty Years of Natural Medicine, compiled by Richard Pitcairn-Knowles, published 1 August 2012 (94 pp., Sevenoaks: Richard Pitcaim-Knowles, ISBN-10: 0955859123 & ISBN-13: 9780955859120) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries

The Hospital of St Mary, Chichester: A History from 1229 to the Present, by Ken Green and edited by Paul Foster, published 2013 (Otter memorial paper no 34, 112 pp., Chichester: University College, ISBN-10: 1907852220 & ISBN-13: 9781907852220) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

Graylingwell War Hospital, 1915-1919, by Katherine Slay, published 2013 (New Chichester papers, no. 5, 32 pp., Chichester Local History Society & printed at University of Chichester, ISBN-10: 1907852255 & ISBN-13: 9781907852251) accessible at: Chichester Local History Society & West Sussex Libraries

An investigation into the move towards electronic journals: a case study of NHS libraries in Kent, Surrey and Sussex, by Rebecca England, published 2013 in Health Information and Libraries Journal (vol. 30, no. 3, article, pp.241-244)

Older HIV-infected individuals present late and have a higher mortality: Brighton, UK cohort study, by Collins C. Iwuji, Duncan Churchill, Yvonne Gilleece, Helen A. Weiss and Martin Fisher, published 26 April 2013 in BMC Public Health (vol. 13, article, p.397)   Download PDF

Another Way: The Horder Centre Sixty Years of Evolution, by Charles Gallannaugh, published 6 June 2013 (218 pp., AuthorHouseUK, ISBN-10: 1481796801 & ISBN-13: 9781481796804) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
At a time when the National Health Service (NHS) is undergoing critical scrutiny following numerous revelations of poor care and mismanagement, this book tells the story of an independent hospital, which working in partnership with the NHS yet remaining outside the state system, provides a very high quality of care for patients which is free at the point of delivery. The story of the Horder Centre falls conveniently into two parts. Part one describes the time from its founding until the death of its founder, Cecilia Bochenek, in 1981. Part two describes the establishment of the surgical unit there and the development of a modern joint replacement service. To maintain the status quo is no longer tenable. A radical change is needed in the NHS and if the independent sector or the private sector can assist in that endeavour, their contribution should be welcomed not resisted.

Lost Hospitals of Brighton and Hove, by Harry Gaston, published 4 October 2013 (xiv + 191 pp., Newhaven: Southern Editorial Services, ISBN-10: 0955846749 & ISBN-13: 9780955846748) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
When Britain celebrated the birth of the National Health Service in 1948, there were eleven hospitals in Brighton and Hove. Today only four of them remain. What happened to the seven missing hospitals? Should we mourn their loss? Lost Hospitals of Brighton and Hove examines the part those hospitals played in providing health care to local people during the fifty years before the last of them closed. Thanks to the author s research and the memories of many people who worked in or were treated in them, it s possible to build up a picture of the seven Hospitals Bevendean, Foredown, Hove General, Lady Chichester, New Sussex Hospital for Women, Sussex Maternity and the Sussex Throat and Ear. All seven of these hospitals enjoyed good times. Some had occasional difficult days marked by media and parliamentary criticism. In some the physical conditions were far from satisfactory, the buildings old and decaying. But in all of them the vast majority of staff worked well and compassionately, and most were well-loved by the patients. Little now remains of these hospitals. Many of the buildings have been demolished. Some now house flats and apartments; a couple serve other health purposes although none, like some of those in London, are now the sites of supermarkets or even prisons. Lost Hospitals of Brighton and Hove tells the stories of these seven hospitals, the patients and the staff who worked in them stories that cry out to be told before memories fade and they are lost for ever.

Can your public library improve your health and well-being? An investigation of East Sussex Library and Information Service, by Anneliese Ingham, published 2014 in Health Information and Libraries Journal (vol. 31, no. 2, article, pp.156-160)

An investigation into the feasibility of designing a framework for the quantitative evaluation of the Clinical Librarian service at an NHS Trust in Brighton, UK, by Archana Deshmukh and Tom Roper, published 2014 in Health Information and Libraries Journal (vol. 31, no. 4, article, pp.314-317)

The specialty choices of graduates from Brighton and Sussex Medical School: a longitudinal cohort study, by Katherine Woolf, Caroline Elton and Melanie Newport, published 2015 in BMC Medical Education (vol. 15, no. 1, article, p.46)   View Online

Implementing evidence-based supported employment in Sussex for people with severe mental illness, by Rhonda van Veggel, Geoffrey Waghorn, Shannon Dias, published 2015 in British Journal of Occupational Therapy (vol. 78, no. 5, article, pp.286-294)
Introduction The aim of this research was to evaluate a large-scale implementation of evidence-based supported employment for people with severe mental illness, at 17 locations throughout Sussex, England. Method A parallel group observational design was used to evaluate an implementation of the individual placement and support approach to supported employment. Three sites provided both a comparison pre-individual placement and support cohort (n?=?140), and a new post-individual placement and support cohort (n?=?107) as part of the individual placement and support implementation (n?=?446). All individual placement and support sites involved community mental health teams forming partnerships with Southdown Supported Employment to co-locate an employment specialist into each mental health team. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants commencing competitive employment during the follow-up period. Results The new individual placement and support sites attained higher fidelity with respect to individual placement and support principles and practices (mean 97 of 125) than the pre-individual placement and support sites (mean 77 of 125). Significantly more individual placement and support participants commenced competitive employment than pre-individual placement and support participants (24.9% vs 14.3%). Individual placement and support participants experienced less delay before commencing their first job (153 vs 371 days), and when employed, worked more hours per week (24.3 vs 15.4 hours). Conclusion This implementation of individual placement and support in Sussex improved on the previous vocational services. Although progress is encouraging there is much room for improvement. More resources appear needed to support programme development, specifically to strengthen site-level management, training, technical support, fidelity assessment, programme monitoring, and outcome evaluation. Introduction The aim of this research was to evaluate a large-scale implementation of evidence-based supported employment for people with severe mental illness, at 17 locations throughout Sussex, England. Method A parallel group observational design was used to evaluate an implementation of the individual placement and support approach to supported employment. Three sites provided both a comparison pre-individual placement and support cohort (n?=?140), and a new post-individual placement and support cohort (n?=?107) as part of the individual placement and support implementation (n?=?446). All individual placement and support sites involved community mental health teams forming partnerships with Southdown Supported Employment to co-locate an employment specialist into each mental health team. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants commencing competitive employment during the follow-up period. Results The new individual placement and support sites attained higher fidelity with respect to individual placement and support principles and practices (mean 97 of 125) than the pre-individual placement and support sites (mean 77 of 125). Significantly more individual placement and support participants commenced competitive employment than pre-individual placement and support participants (24.9% vs 14.3%). Individual placement and support participants experienced less delay before commencing their first job (153 vs 371 days), and when employed, worked more hours per week (24.3 vs 15.4 hours). Conclusion This implementation of individual placement and support in Sussex improved on the previous vocational services. Although progress is encouraging there is much room for improvement. More resources appear needed to support programme development, specifically to strengthen site-level management, training, technical support, fidelity assessment, programme monitoring, and outcome evaluation.

My Asylum: St Francis Psychiatric Hospital, Haywards Heath, 1959-1995, a history and personal memoir, by Joe Hughes, published 24 July 2015 (CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, ISBN-10: 1505371317 & ISBN-13: 9781505371314) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

'What has been your experience of providing short-term orthodontics?'?A pilot survey of GDPs in East Sussex, by S. Luqmani, published 2016 in British Dental Journal (vol. 220, no. 5, article, pp.227-228)   View Online
Short-term orthodontics (STO) aims to enhance a patient's smile by aligning their anterior teeth. It is considered a quicker alternative to conventional orthodontics and less destructive than veneers. As such, it has recently gained much popularity in cosmetic dentistry worldwide. STO is provided almost exclusively by general dental practitioners (GDPs), however, the current literature on this subject focuses largely on the opinions of orthodontists and cosmetic dentists, respectively. The aim of this paper, on the other hand, is to examine the opinions of GDPs and what experience they have had of providing STO. It concludes that GDPs performing STO in East Sussex have expressed a wish to receive more teaching and support from their local orthodontists. It also suggests a need for orthodontic professional bodies to issue guidelines on case selection for STO in order to assist GDPs in recognising which malocclusions are beyond their scope of practice.

Developing Mental Health Provision in West Sussex: Harold A. Kidd, first Medical Superintendent of Graylingwell Hospital, 1896-1926, by Maureen Wright, published 2017 in Southern History (article)   Download PDF

Catalogue of the Records of the Royal West Sussex Hospital, published (no date) (Royal West Sussex Hospital) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 5621]