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On the Military Earthworks of the Southdowns, with a more enlarged Account of Cissbury, one of the principal of them, by Rev. Edward Turner, published 1850 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 3, article, pp.173-184) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2088] & The Keep [LIB/500222] & S.A.S. library   View Online

On the Camps at Cissbury, Sussex, by George Vere Irving, published December 1857 in Journal of the British Archaeological Association (first series, vol 13, issue 4, article, pp.274-294)   View Online

Examination of the Hill Forts of Sussex with an account of excavations at Cissbury & Highdown, by Col. A. H. Lane Fox, published 1869

An Examination into the Character and probable Origin of the Hill Forts of Sussex, by Colonel Augustus Henry Lane Fox, F.S.A., published 1869 in Archaeologia; or Miscellaneous Tracts relating to Antiquity (vol. 42, issue 1, article, pp.27-52)   View Online
Abstract:
In the month of September last whilst staying at Brighton I examined nearly the whole of the ancient earthworks which occupy the summits of the highest eminences of the Downs between Beachy Head on the east, and the neighbourhood of Chichester on the west.

Further Remarks on the Hill Forts of Sussex: being an Account of Excavations in the Forts at Cissbury and Highdown, by Colonel Augustus Henry Lane Fox, F.S.A., published 1869 in Archaeologia; or Miscellaneous Tracts relating to Antiquity (vol. 42, issue 1, article, pp.53-76)   View Online
Abstract:
In a paper which I had the honour of reading to this Society on the 6th February 1868 I gave a general description of the ancient earthworks of the downs between Beachy Head and Chichester, and I concluded by expressing an opinion, derived chiefly from a consideration of the principles of castrametation, outline, and other indications observable on the surface, that these intrenchments belonged to the Ancient British period, and were not, as some writers have supposed, the work of the Roman invaders of this country.

The Flint-Works at Cissbury, by Joseph Stevens, published 1872 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 24, article, pp.145-165) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2109] & The Keep [LIB/500242] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Excavations in Cissbury Camp, Sussex, Being a Report of the Exploration Committee of the Anthropological Institute for the Year 1875, by Augustus Lane Fox, published 1875 accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

Recent Excavations at Cissbury, by Ernest Willett, published 1875 in Brighton and Sussex Natural History Scosiety (article, pp.24-)

Excavations in Cissbury Camp. Report of the Exploration Committee of the Anthropological Institute for 1875, by Col. Lane Fox, published 1875 in Journal of the Anthropological Institute (article, pp.357-)

Report on some further discoveries at Cissbury, by J. Park Harrison, M.A., published 1877 in Journal of the Anthropological Institute (article)

Some Rune-like Characters in Chalk, by J. P. Harrison, published 1877 in Proceeds of the British Association (article, pp.117-)

Note on the animal remains found at Cissbury, by Professor Rolleston, published 1877 in Journal of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland (vol. 8, article, pp.20-36)

On marks found upon chalk at Cissbury, by J. Park Harrison, published 1877 in Journal of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland (vol. 6, article, pp.263-271)

Notes on skeleton Found at Cissbury, April, 1878, by George Rolleston, published 1879 in Journal of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland (vol. 8, article, pp.377-389)

On Flint Workings at Cissbury, Sussex, by Ernest Henry Willett, published 1880 in Archaeologia; or Miscellaneous Tracts relating to Antiquity (vol. 45, issue 2, article, pp.337-348)   View Online
Abstract:
In 1868 Colonel A. Lane Fox, F.S.A. contributed a paper to this Society, on the Sussex Hill Forts, and on the principles of castrametation which a most careful examination of the whole series led him to conclude had been adopted by the tribes who had constructed them.
In the course of his inquiry, and in the description of the seventeen earthworks that line our Sussex downs, he mentioned the occurrence, in several places, of various pits in and about the camps. The instances are at Wolstanbury, Highdown Hill, Mount Caburn, and Cissbury - most notably the latter.
This paper was shortly followed by another, giving a detailed account of the extensive excavations carried on by him at Highdown and at Cissbury. In this communication he dwells at length on the pits situate within the latter camp, their character and contents; the flint implements especially are elaborately classified and fully described by him. The examination of about thirty pits resulted in the following information,-to which I may be permitted briefly to refer in order to be intelligible. That they were from 20 to 70 feet wide, and of a depth of from 5 to 7 feet below the surface. That they contained a great quantity of flint implements, a few bones, dead land-shells, charcoal and fragments of coarse pottery distributed in layers of red clay and chalk rubble, the pottery being only found immediately beneath the turf.
In considering the object and use of these pits, Colonel Lane Eox states that he believes them to have been for the purpose of obtaining flint for manufacturing implements, and subsequently to have been used for habitations.
I hope to add confirmatory evidence of both of these theories.

Neolithic Dew-ponds and Cattle-ways, by Arthur John Hubbard, M.D. and George Hubbard, F.S.A., published 1905 (London: Longmans, Green & Co.) accessible at: & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Neolithic Dew-ponds and Cattle-ways, by Arthur John Hubbard, M.D. and George Hubbard, F.S.A., published 1907 (2nd edition, 116 pp., London: Longmans, Green & Co.) accessible at: & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

On the date of Grime's Graves and Cissbury flint-mines, by Reginald A. Smith, published 1912 in Archaeologia; or Miscellaneous Tracts relating to Antiquity (vol. 63, article, pp.109-158)   View Online
Abstract:
The formal recognition by the Monaco Congress (1906) of the Aurignac stage of culture marks a distinct advance in the classification of palaeolithic cave-relics. The point has been keenly debated, but most are now agreed that Aurignac, as a typical station, comes between Le Moustier and Solutré, and represents a civilization that extended over a large part of Europe. This stage has in recent years been so thoroughly studied that its distinctive types can be easily recognized, and many cave-deposits readily fall into this division; but so far very little of this sort has been noticed in England, where the industry seems, however, to have had a special and a splendid development.

Cissbury Camp, by Unknown, published April 1921 in The Antiquaries Journal (vol. 1 issue 2, note, p.142)   View Online

Some Roman Antiquities - Wiston, Chanctonbury and Cissbury, by Eliot Curwen and Eliot Cecil Curwen, published 1922 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 63, notes & queries, pp.220-221) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2148] & The Keep [LIB/500281] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Excavations near Cissbury, by Unknown, published April 1922 in The Antiquaries Journal (vol. 2 issue 2, note, pp.138-139)   View Online

The Cissbury earthworks, by Unknown, published October 1922 in The Antiquaries Journal (vol. 2 issue 4, note, pp.377-378)   View Online

Pit-dwellings in Sussex, by H. S. Toms, published April 1923 in The Antiquaries Journal (vol. 3 issue 2, note, p.143)   View Online

Discoveries near Cissbury, by Garnet R. Wolseley and Reginald A. Smith, published October 1924 in The Antiquaries Journal (vol. 4 issue 4, article, pp.347-359)   View Online
Abstract:
Park Brow is a ridge of the South Downs, running roughly north and south. The southern end of the hill, upon which three early inhabited sites have been found, abuts on the valley from which rises the higher hill crowned by Cissbury camp. On Park Brow there is clear evidence of the presence of man in ancient days. Very many lynchets or steep banks are found, a sunken trackway runs along the southern crest of the hill, adjoining which, where it passes the Early Iron Age site, is seen an embanked pit; while over the greater part of this area, as well as in the adjoining valleys, fragments of ancient pottery, rough flint scrapers, and other implements, together with many flint flakes, can be picked up.

The Cissbury Earthworks, by Herbert S. Toms and Christine Toms, published 1926 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 67, article, pp.55-84) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2152] & The Keep [LIB/500285] & S.A.S. library

Bronze Age hoard from Sussex, by Unknown, published October 1926 in The Antiquaries Journal (vol. 6 issue 4, note, pp.444-446)   View Online

The Ancient Hill-Fort at Cissbury, by H. S. Toms, published 1927 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. I no. 8, article, pp.350-352) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2303][Lib 8326] & The Keep [LIB/500137]

Ancient Ponds near Cissbury, by H. S. Toms, published 1927 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. I no. 9, article, pp.404-407) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2303][Lib 8326] & The Keep [LIB/500137]

Excavations at Cissbury, by E.C. Curwen, published 1931 in Antiquity (vol. 11, article, pp.14-36)

The Date of Cissbury Camp, by E. Cecil Curwen and R. P. Williamson, published January 1931 in The Antiquaries Journal (vol. 11 issue 1, article, pp.14-36)   View Online
Abstract:
The hill-fort of Cissbury, situated on a ridge of the Sussex Downs four miles north of Worthing, is one of the best known examples of its kind, though in regard to the strength of its defences it can scarcely be compared with such Wessex forts as Maiden Castle (Dorchester), Hambledon, Yarnbury, or Battlesbury.

A Chalk Disk from Cissbury, by J. C. M. Give, published 1932 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 73, notes & queries, p.202) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2158] & The Keep [LIB/500356] & S.A.S. library

Camps round Vetus Pons. V - Chanctonbury, VI - Cissbury & VII - High Down, by F. Edwin Hodder, M.A., published 1932 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. VI no. 9, article, pp.568-571) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9325] & The Keep [LIB/500175]

The Stone Age Villages of Downland. III - Mount Carvey and Myrtlegrove, by J. H. Pull, published 1935 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IX no. 9, article, pp.577-579) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9330] & The Keep [LIB/500180]

A Romano-British Site in Canada Bottom, Findon, near Cissbury, by N. E. S. Norris and G. P. Burstow, published February 1949 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XII no. 5, article, pp.103-104) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8230] & The Keep [LIB/500214] & S.A.S. library

Cissbury, by F. W. H. Migeod, published 1950 accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

An Excavation on Cissbury in 1868, by G. P. Burstow, published May 1959 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XV no. 3, note, pp.98-99) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8233] & The Keep [LIB/500217] & S.A.S. library

An Excavation on Cissbury in 1868, by H. C. P. Smail, published November 1959 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XV no. 4, note, p.132) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8233] & The Keep [LIB/500217] & S.A.S. library

A Saxon Mint at Cissbury, by E. Cecil Curwen, published November 1959 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XV no. 4, note, pp.134-135) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8233] & The Keep [LIB/500217] & S.A.S. library

Miniature Flint Axe from Cissbury, by David Field, published 1982 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 120, archaeological note, pp.205-207) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8620] & The Keep [LIB/500307] & S.A.S. library

The Place-name 'Cissbury', by Timothy P. Hudson, published 1982 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 120, historical note, p.231) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8620] & The Keep [LIB/500307] & S.A.S. library

A Circular Enclosure within Cissbury Ring, by Frederick G. Aldsworth, published 1983 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 121, archaeological note, p.198) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8902] & The Keep [LIB/500308] & S.A.S. library

Some Flintwork from Church Hill, Findon and Cissbury, by Christopher Butler, published 1992 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 130, archaeological note) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 11918] & The Keep [LIB/500289] & S.A.S. library

The neolithic industrial landscape at Cissbury, Sussex, by David Field, published 1994 in Bulletin of the Peak District Mines Historical Society (vol. 12, no. 3, article, pp.22-25)   Download PDF

Cissbury Ring. A survey by the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, by J. D. Donachie and D. J. Field, published 1994 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 132, article, pp.25-32) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 12979] & The Keep [LIB/500294] & S.A.S. library

Neolithic mining landscape at Cissbury, Sussex, by D. Field, T.D. Ford and L. Willies, published March 1994 in Mining before powder (article, pp.22-25, Peak District Mines Historical Society)

The Gun Inn at Findon, Cissbury Solstice and Other Short Pieces , by Ian H. Mallender, published 2000 (Imprint)