Bibliography - Industry and work: Architecture
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Architectural Notices Relating Chiefly to Churches in the County of Sussex, by Rev. J. L. Petit, M.A., published 1849 in The Archaeological Journal (vol. 6, article, pp.137-145)   View Online

The Architectural History of Boxgrove Priory, by Rev. J. L. Petit, M.A., F.S.A., published 1861 (Chichester: William Hayley Mason) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2849][Lib 15693] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries   View Online

Architectural History of St. Mary's Church, New Shoreham, by Edmund Sharpe, M.A., F.R.I.B.A., published 1861 (Chichester: William Hayley Mason) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2849][Lib 15693] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries   View Online

The Architectural History of Chichester Cathedral, by Rev. R. Willis, M.A., F.R.S., published 1861 (Chichester: William Hayley Mason) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2849][Lib 15693] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries   View Online

The De Warrenne 'Chequy' in Architecture, by M. A. Lower, published 1862 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 14, notes & queries, pp.263-264) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2099] & The Keep [LIB/500233] & S.A.S. library   View Online

A Quiet Corner of England. Studies of Landscape and Architecture in Winchelsea, Rye and Romney Marsh, with numerous illustrations by Alfred Dawson, by Basil Champneys, published 1875 (64 pp., London: Seeley, Jackson and Halliday) accessible at: & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The Architectural History of the Cluniac Priory of St. Pancras at Lewes, by W. H. St John Hope, B.A., F.S.A., published 1884 in The Archaeological Journal (vol. 41, article, pp.1-34)   View Online

Sussex Domestic Architecture in its Humbler Aspects, by J. L. André, published 1886 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 34, article, pp.39-56) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2119] & The Keep [LIB/500252] & S.A.S. library   View Online

The Architectural History of the Cluniac Priory of St Pancras at Lewes, by W. H. St John Hope, published 1886 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 34, article, pp.71-106) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2119] & The Keep [LIB/500252] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Some Notes upon the Architecture of Otehall, in the parish of Wivelsfield, Sussex, by Ralph Nevill, published 1886 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 34, article, pp.255-257) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2119] & The Keep [LIB/500252] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Marks on Eastbourne Old Church, by Geo. M. Atkinson, published 1893 in Archaeological Journal (50(1), article, pp.133-136)

The Low Side Windows of Sussex Churches, by Philip Mainwaring Johnston, published 1898 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 41, article, pp.159-202) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2126] & The Keep [LIB/500259] & S.A.S. library   View Online

The Low Side Windows of Sussex Churches, by Philip Mainwaring Johnston, published 1898 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 41, notes & queries, pp.242-243) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2126] & The Keep [LIB/500259] & S.A.S. library   View Online

The Low Side Windows of Sussex Churches, continued, by Philip Mainwaring Johnston, published 1899 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 42, article, pp.117-179) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2127] & The Keep [LIB/500260] & S.A.S. library   View Online

The Low Side Windows of Sussex Churches, by W. Heneage Legge, published 1899 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 42, notes & queries, pp.248-249) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2127] & The Keep [LIB/500260] & S.A.S. library   View Online

The Low Side Windows of Sussex Churches, by Philip M. Johnston, published 1900 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 43, notes & queries, p.276) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2128] & The Keep [LIB/500261] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Old English Doorways: a series of examples from Tudor time to the end of the XVII century, by W. G. Davie and H. Tanner, published 1903 (London: B. T. Batsford) accessible at: & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Three East Sussex Churches. Battle, Icklesham, Peasmarsh. A study of their Architectural History. 1. Battle, by Greville M. Livett, vicarof Wateringbury, Kent, published 1903 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 46, article, pp.69-93) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2131] & The Keep [LIB/500264] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Three East Sussex Churches. Battle, Peasmarsh, Icklesham. A Study of their Architectural History. 2. Peasmarsh, by Greville M. Livett, F.S.A., vicarof Wateringbury, Kent, published 1904 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 47, article, pp.35-46) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2132] & The Keep [LIB/500265] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Three East Sussex Churches. Battle, Peasmarsh, Icklesham. A Study of their Architectural History. 3. Icklesham, by Greville M. Livett, F.S.A., vicarof Wateringbury, Kent, published 1905 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 48, article, pp.38-64) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2133] & The Keep [LIB/500266] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Churches and other Antiquities of West Sussex: with architectural and historical notes, by A. H. Peat and L. C. Halsted, published 1906 (iv + 184 pp. & 31 illus., Chichester: J. W. Moore) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 58] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

The Victoria History of the County of Sussex, edited by William Page, F.S.A., published 1907 (vol. 2: Ecclesiastical, Maritime, Social and Economic History, Population 1801-1901, Industries, Agriculture, Forestry, Architecture, Schools and Sport, xv + 481 pp. (facsimile edition published 1973), London: Victoria County History, ISBN-10: 0712905863 & ISBN-13: 9780712905862) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2399][Lib 9097] & The Keep [LIB/500090][Lib/504899] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries   View Online

The Church of Worth in Sussex: notes on its architectural history, edited by W. P. D. Stebbing, published 1909 (Campden) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

Tortington Church and Priory. Notes on their History and Architecture, by Philip Mainwaring Johnston, F.S.A., F.R.I.B.A., published 1909 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 52, article, pp.163-177) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2137] & The Keep [LIB/500270] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Anglo-Saxon Church Architecture in Sussex, by Col. H. L. Jessep, R.E., published 1914 (62 pp., Winchester: Warren & Sons) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

Brief notes on the architecture of the church of St. Mary de Haura, New Shoreham, Sussex, by Walter Marshall, published 1915 (Edinburgh: Turnbull & Spears) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

Wren's House and Pallant House, Chichester, by Nathaniel Lloyd, published 1919 in Gems of English Architecture (IV, article, pp.89-91) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 10709/p89-91][Lib 10710/p89-91]

The Church of S Andrew at Jevington: some notes on its history and architectural features, by W. Budgen, published c.1920 (pamphlet, 8 pp.) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9245] & British Library & R.I.B.A. Library & East Sussex Libraries

The Architectural History of Amberley Castle, by W. D. Peckham, M.A., published 1921 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 62, article, pp.21-63) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2147] & The Keep [LIB/500280] & S.A.S. library   View Online

Notes on Lewes Castle and other ancient buildings in Lewes, with plans, by Walter H. Godfrey, published 1926 (pamphlet, 8 pp., Sussex Archæological Society) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 12401] & R.I.B.A. Library & East Sussex Libraries

Window Glass , by Arthur Ponsonby, published February 1926 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. I no. 1, note, pp.22-23) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8950] & The Keep [LIB/500203] & S.A.S. library

Moated Sites , by C. H. Goodman, published February 1926 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. I no. 1, note, pp.23-24) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8950] & The Keep [LIB/500203] & S.A.S. library

The Story of Architecture in England, Part I., by Walter H. Godfrey, F.S.A., F.R.I.B.A., published 1928 (London: B. T. Batsford Ltd.)

"Ammonite Order" in Architecture, by W. H. G. [Walter H. Godfrey], published February 1928 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. II no. 1, note, pp.26-27) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8951] & The Keep [LIB/500204] & S.A.S. library

Sussex Roofs, by A. H. Diplock, published 1929 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. III no. 9, article, pp.620-621) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2307] & The Keep [LIB/500140]

East Sussex Tithe-Barns, by Allan Phillip, published 1930 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IV no. 7, article, pp.554-558) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2308][Lib 2309] & The Keep [LIB/500173]

The Story of Architecture in England, Part II. Post Reformation, by Walter H. Godfrey, F.S.A., F.R.I.B.A., published 1931 (London: B. T. Batsford Ltd.)
Review in Sussex Notes & Queries, May 1931:
A most useful and interesting book on that portion of English Architecture which , after a period of neglect and contempt, has come into its own, of recent years. Starting with Tudor times it carries on the story to the period of the Regency of George IV.
It is full of excellent illustrations and the letterpress will lead the reader to a full appreciation of the dignity of the buildings which are described.

An American's Impressions, by Delos H. Smith, published 1931 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. V no. 5, article, pp.364-368) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2310] & The Keep [LIB/500174]

Cowdray in the parish of Eastbourne, near Midhurst, Sussex: a short history, architectural and biographical, together with a detailed guide to the ruins and museum, and some account of the ancient domain, by Torrens Trotter, published 1932 (2nd edition, 69 pp. & illus.) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15724] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

Sussex Barns, by J. Hutchings, A.R.I.B.A., published 1932 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. VI no. 12, article, pp.771-779) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9325] & The Keep [LIB/500175]

Native Walls, by A. H. Diplock, published 1933 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. VII no. 4, article, pp.230-231) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2312] & The Keep [LIB/500176]

Sussex Oak in Domestic Architecture, by Harold G. Turner, F.R.I.B.A., M.Inst.C.E., published 1933 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. VII no. 9, article, pp.588-594) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2312] & The Keep [LIB/500176]

Building Costs in 1911, by Ernest Straker, published November 1933 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. IV no. 8, note, pp.248-249) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2203][Lib 8222][Lib 8861] & The Keep [LIB/500206] & S.A.S. library

Sussex Homes of Long Ago, by M. Adeline Boulter-Cooke, published 1935 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. IX no. 7, article, pp.423-429) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9330] & The Keep [LIB/500180]

Ancient Houses in Sussex, by Ian C. Hannah, F.S.A., published February 1935 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. V no. 5, article, pp.133-134) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2204][Lib 8223][Lib 8862] & The Keep [LIB/500207] & S.A.S. library

Building in the Downs Country, by John D. Clarke, F.R.I.B.A., published 1936 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. X no. 1, article, pp.53-57) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2315][Lib 9331] & The Keep [LIB/500181]

Some Sussex Follies: Queer Towers and Their Eccentric Builders, by William A. Bagley, published 1937 in Sussex County Magazine (vol. XI no. 3, article, pp.171-176) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2316][Lib 9332] & The Keep [LIB/500182]

The Old Barns of Sussex [at Patcham, Newick, West Blatchington and Alciston], by Country Life contributor(s), published 11 June 1938 in Country Life (article, pp.598-599)

East Grinstead. Notes on its Architecture. 1. the High Street, by R. T. Mason, published 1939 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 80, article, pp.3-28) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2165] & The Keep [LIB/500349] & S.A.S. library

Timber house at Halland, Sussex; Architect: Serge Chermayeff, published 16 February 1939 in Architects' journal (article, pp.61-78)

East Grinstead. Notes on its Architecture. 2. Medieval Farms, by R. T. Mason, published 1940 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 81, article, pp.3-18) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2166] & The Keep [LIB/500348] & S.A.S. library

The Pigeon House, Angmering, by F. B. S. [F. Bentham Stevens], published November 1940 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. VIII no. 4, article, pp.113-114) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8865][Lib 2207] & The Keep [LIB/500210] & S.A.S. library

Medieval Cottages in Sussex, by Ian C. Hannah, M.P., F.S.A., published May 1943 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. IX no. 5, article, pp.124-126) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8227][Lib 2208] & The Keep [LIB/500211] & S.A.S. library

Roger Morris, architect & Carne's seat, Goodwood House (1743), by C. Hussey, published 17 March 1944 in Country Life (article, p.473)

Design for rural cottages selected from the competition promoted by the East Sussex branch of the Rural District Councils Association, edited by J. L. Denman, published 1945 (15 pp., Crowborough: J. H. Thomas, Council Offices) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library

Regency terraces at Hove, Sussex, by Dorothy Stroud, published 6 April 1945 in Country Life (article, pp.592-593)

Parham in Sussex. A Historical and Descriptive Survey based upon the researches of a number of authorities, accompanied by an architectural description., published 1947 (London: B. T. Batsford Ltd.) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2814]

Petworth House, Sussex, by C. Hussey, published 7 March 1947 in Country Life (article, pp.422-425) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library

Coke's house, West Burton, Sussex, by C. Hussey, published 31 October 1947 in Country Life (article, pp.878-881)

Cowdray in the parish of Eastbourne, near Midhurst, Sussex: a short history, architectural and biographical, together with a detailed guide to the ruins and museum, and some account of the ancient domain, by Torrens Trotter, published 1948 (3rd edition, 70 pp. & 4 leaves of plates, Letchworth, Herts.: Printed by Loxley Brothers) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries

Landhurst, Hartfield, Sussex; Architect: L. Osman, by Arthur Oswald, published 18 February 1949 in Country Life (article, pp.366-368)

Flint & Stone in Sussex, by Country Life contributor(s), published 24 June 1949 in Country Life (article, p.1512)

Beechwood, Lavington, Sussex, by C. Hussey, published 19 August 1949 in Country Life (article, pp.538-541)

The History and Architecture of Brighton, by Antony Dale, published 1950 (viii + 96 pp., Brighton: Bredon & Heiginbothom) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/503787] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Buxted Park, Sussex: ca. 1725, burnt 1940, rebuilt with old materials, by Country Life contributor(s), published 4 August 1950 in Country Life (article, pp.374-378, and subsequent issues)

Parham Park, Sussex, by C. Hussey, published 1 June 1951 in Country Life (article, pp.1716-1719, and 2 subsequent issues)

Building in England, down to 1540, by L. F. Salzman, F.S.A., published 1952 (Oxford: The Clarendon Press) accessible at: & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Review by G. D. Johnston in Sussex Notes and Queries, November 1952:
All Mr. Salzman's colleagues in the Sussex Archaeological Society will wish to join in congratulating him on the publication of this monumental work. The book, he tells us in his preface, was completed in 1934 and not finding a publisher able to produce a volume of this size, he presented the manuscript to the Society of Antiquaries, where it was often consulted by students in their library. It was through a grant from the Society of Authors that the Oxford University Press was at length enabled to issue it in its present form.
The book is encyclopaedic in its range. Mr. Salzman has printed in full 123 original contracts for various buildings dating from 1308 to 1538 and he has written a full account of all the processes of building, including materials and their sources, the conditions and terms of employment of labour and many other incidental matters. As a glossary of terms alone it is an invaluable contribution to our knowledge of the subject, for no one is better equipped to assemble the host of technical terms and interpret the many curious forms in which they are met. This is not a book to be read at one sitting, being in the main a work of reference, indispensable to all who study the subject. But no one will be surprised that Mr. Salzman has made much of his narrative eminently readable in spite of the necessity of marshalling pages of figures and technical data. His series of descriptions of buildings from those medieval authors who have written of them on various occasions is one of the most delightful parts of the book. Mr. Salzman has consulted some 2,000 printed works and some 1,500 manuscripts in the preparation of this comprehensive treatise and he has laid everyone who comes after him under a lasting debt in the accomplishment of a Herculean task which he alone could have attempted.

An Elastic Barn [at Patcham], published 10 March 1955 in Country Life (article, p.687)

Architectural and historical notes: the Borough Church of St Clement, Hastings, by H. C. B. Foyster, published 1956 (5th edition, 18 pp.) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library

Chichester -- the all-rounder city, by S. Gordon Joseph, published July 1956 in Official Architecture and Planning (vol. 19, no. 7, article, pp.340-344)

Building Styles in the Weald, by Joseph S. Gordon, published 12 July 1956 in Country Life (article, pp.73-74)

Brighton -- the seaside town, by S. Gordon Joseph, published October 1956 in Official Architecture and Planning (vol. 19, no. 10, article, pp.505-509)

Purlined Hall Roofs, by R. T. Mason, published May 1957 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XIV nos. 13 & 14, note, pp.248-249) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8232][Lib 2213] & The Keep [LIB/500216] & S.A.S. library

Mocatta's Stations for the Brighton Railway, by David Cole, published 1958 in Journal of Transport History (vol. 3, article, pp.149-157) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 1825/p149-157]

Houndsell Place, Sussex, by Christopher Hussey, published 17 July 1958 in Country Life (article, pp.126-129)

Architecture in Mediaeval Writings, by John H. Harvey, published 1959 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 97, article, pp.21-34) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2182] & The Keep [LIB/500332] & S.A.S. library

House at Lindfield, Sussex; Architect: Patrick Tetley, published 29 September 1960 in Country Life (article, pp.684-685)

Stable converted into a dower house, Lewes, Sussex; Architect: William Crabtree, published 12 January 1961 in Country Life (article, pp.72-73)

Penn's Rocks, Withyham, Sussex, by Christopher Hussey, published 23 March 1961 in Country Life (article, pp.644-647)

Crested Ridge Tiles, by E. W. Holden, published May 1962 in Sussex Notes & Queries (vol. XV no. 9, note, p.322) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8233][Lib 2982] & The Keep [LIB/500217] & S.A.S. library

Mansby Cottage, Coates Common, near Fittleworth, Sussex; Architect: Howard V. Lobb, published 13 December 1962 in Country Life (article, pp.1554-1555)

Framed buildings of the Weald, by Reginald Thomas Mason, published 1964 (96 pp., Horsham: Coach Publishing House) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 28] & The Keep [LIB/502127] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The Buildings of England: Sussex, edited by Ian Nairn and Nikolaus Pevsner, published 1965 (693 pp. & 64 pp. of plates, Harmondsworth: Penguin Books) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14772] & The Keep [LIB/502129] & R.I.B.A. Library

Slate Roofing in Medieval Sussex, by Eric W. Holden, published 1965 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 103, article, pp.67-78) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2188] & The Keep [LIB/500326] & S.A.S. library

The Origin of some Medieval Roofing Slates from Sussex, by John W. Murray, published 1965 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 103, article, pp.79-82) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2188] & The Keep [LIB/500326] & S.A.S. library

Medieval undercrofts and town houses, by P.A. Faulkner, published 1966 in Archaeological Journal (123(1), article, pp.120-135)

Uckfield House, Sussex, by Christopher Hussey, published 14 July 1966 in Country Life (article, pp.80-83)

Survey of the Structural Development of Sussex Churches, by Sussex Historic Churches Trust, published 1967 (The History Press, ISBN-10: 0850330874 & ISBN-13: 9780850330878)

A Survey of the Structural Development of Sussex Churches, by J. L. Denman, published 1967 (63 pp., Chichester: Sussex Historic Churches Trust, ISBN-10: 0850330874 & ISBN-13: 9780850330878) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 2544] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Review by G. D. J. [G. D. Johnston] in Sussex Notes and Queries, May 1968:
The Author - one of our Vice-Presidents - is well known to us by his descriptions of the Churches we visit from time to time, in particular North Stoke last June. It is a welcome, lucid and well-written historical account of the architecture of Sussex Churches explaining the accepted divisions of Norman, Early English, Transitional, Decorated and Perpendicular styles and continuing through the barren post-Reformation period down to the Victorian revival and the present day. It treats Architecture as a living growing science and explains reasons for changes (such as the shape of the arch) and is illustrated by numerous very clear drawings mostly by the Author and is to be strongly recommended to all our Members as a background to visits to Churches.
In a later Edition it might be useful to add a short glossary of unusual terms which are apt to puzzle or deter the tyro and note that the present Stopham Bridge was built by the Rector, Canon Harlyng, about 1423.

Demonstration project -- 1: Crawley, published November 1968 in Official Architecture and Planning (vol. 31, no. 11, article, pp.1434-1436)

Framed buildings of the Weald, by Reginald Thomas Mason, published 1969 (2nd revised & enlarged edition, 111 pp. & 20 pp. of plates, Horsham: Coach Publishing House) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The buildings of England. West Kent and the Weald, by John Newman and Nikolaus Pevsner, published 1969 (Harmondsworth: Penguin Books) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

Paulsgrove House and 17th Century House Plans in Hampshire and West Sussex, by R.H. Cake, Elizabeth Lewis and J. Noon, published 1972 in Post-Medieval Archaeology (vol. 6, no. 1, article, pp.160-174)

Sports hall and games centre, Worthing, Sussex; Architect: F. Morris, published January 1972 in Building Specification (article, pp.21-25) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library
Includes plans, sections, elevations, photos, cost analysis

Railway Architecture in Sussex, by John Hoare, published 1973 in Sussex Industrial History (No. 6, article, pp.15-24) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 16389/6] & The Keep [LIB/506524]   Download PDF
Abstract:
Railway Architecture, as a theme for study, may seem to possess an inherent contradiction. There is a self-evident functionalism in the structures associated with the engineering of the permanent way; signal-boxes, tunnels, bridges and viaducts all fulfil a specific purpose. The same distinctiveness is not apparent in those structures which have graced our stations since the earliest days of the railways in a wide variety of sizes and styles.
In the early period, whether stations are humble or grand, their design is only in a limited sense related to specifically railway functions. Their characteristics tend to be either domestic or expressive of monumental achievement. Although few English stations were built and owned by anyone other than the operating companies, the resulting buildings generally still fail to develop a distinctive railway appearance. The high level of staffing of stations in the Victorian period, an obvious reflection of the social and economic life of the age, normally ensures that a house accompanies the passenger platform, with either a single-storeyed booking hall attached or the use of part of the ground floor as offices. It is these domestic quarters which tend to be the main constituent of our railway architecture, at least in the small stations. Frequently the house is the only permanent and surviving structure of rural stations of the early period. The small awning for passenger cover, as seen in Sussex in the extension of the eaves of some South Eastern Railway stations of 1851, slowly develops into a lavish provision for passenger comfort, typified by the lengthy canopies and waiting and refreshment rooms erected by the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway in the 1880s. Growth in both scale and number of station structures summarises the Victorian picture. The recent contraction of the 20th century is equally obvious, as a reduction in service in all respects tends to reduce those stations left open to a status barely superior to that of a bus stop. In a sense this can be seen as a development towards a stricter functionalism in railway architecture at the expense of other considerations.

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: District of Arun, published 1974 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 5879]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: Petworth RD, published 1974 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7550]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: Midhurst RD, published 1974 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7549]

The timber-framed buildings of Steyning, by H. M. Lacey and U. E. Lacey, published 1974 (174 pp., published by the authors) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 3601] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

Framed buildings of England, by Reginald Thomas Mason, published 1974 (Horsham: Coach Publishing House) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

Architectural Heritage Guide: District of Horsham, published 1975 (pamphlet, Horsham District Council) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 6783]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: Littlehampton Area, published 1975 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 5991]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: Bognor Area, published c.1975 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 6087]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: Arundel B, published c.1975 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7570]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: Shoreham, published c.1975 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7564]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: Shoreham-by-Sea, published c.1975 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7565]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: Burgess Hill UD, published c.1975 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7559]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: District of Horsham, published c.1975 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7557]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: Bognor UD, published c.1975 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7571]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: Chichester City, published c.1975 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7562]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: Horsham, published c.1975 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7556]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: Worthing Borough, published c.1975 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7576]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: District of Adur, published c.1975 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9067]

Gothic in Sussex, by E. B. Glaisyer, published 1975 (pamphlet) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 5948]
A brief guide to buildings in East and West Sussex.

The Dating of Timber Framed Vernacular Architecture in Sussex, by Reginald Thomas Mason, published 1975 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 113, article, pp.1-6) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 6177] & The Keep [LIB/500316] & S.A.S. library

Plans, elevations and particular measurements of Arundel Castle in Sussex: belonging to His Grace Charles Howard, Duke of Norfolk, Earl of Arundel, edited by Francis W. Steer, published 1976 (32 pp., Arundel: The Duke of Norfolk) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 6310] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

Central library, Worthing, Sussex; Architects: Worthing District Council, Department of Development & Amenities, F. C. M. Morris, L. M. Bather, W. P. Haworth, by Anthony Williams & Burles, published 9 April 1976 in Building (vol. 230, no. 6929(15), article, pp.83-90) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library
Includes plans, sections, elevations, photos, maps, cost analysis

Worthing's new library: Worthing Central Library; Architects: Worthing District Council, Department of Development & Amenities, Frank Morris, published Spring 1976 in Concrete Quarterly (no. 108, article, pp.27-29) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library

Guide to buildings of special architectural or historic interest and conservation areas, by Hove Planning Department, published 1977 (22 pp., Borough of Hove) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library

An introduction to the history of Seaford: with a description of its historic buildings , by Joan A. Astell, published 1977 (2nd revised edition, 9 pp., Seaford Museum of Local History) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library

Modern houses in Britain, 1919-1939 (Architectural history monographs), by Jeremy Gould, published 1977 (65 pp., Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9024] & West Sussex Libraries

The Buildings of England: Sussex, edited by Ian Nairn and Nikolaus Pevsner, published 1977 (694 pp. + 10 blank pages for notes and over 100 illus. and maps, Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, ISBN-10: 0140710280 & ISBN-13: 9780140710281) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/504669] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Guide to buildings of special architectural or historic interest and conservation areas [in Hove and Portslade], by Michael G. I. Ray, published 1977 (22 pp., Hove: Borough of Hove Planning Department) accessible at: & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Splendours on the south coast: Worthing Central Library and the Portsmouth Central Library, by George Berriman, published January 1977 in Library Association Record (vol. 79, no. 1, article, pp.26-29) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library

A thousand years of timber frame: the Weald and Downland Open Air Museum, by J. N. P. Watson, published 27 October 1977 in Country Life (vol. 162 no. 4191, article, pp.1196-1198)

East Sussex architecture: a short history with examples drawn from the county , by Michael Barnard, published 1978 (18 pp., Lewes: East Sussex County Council) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/500038] & R.I.B.A. Library & East Sussex Libraries

Selection of Timber Framed Houses in Harting, by Terry Barnfield and F. C. Johnson, published 1978 (Harting Society) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 6941] & West Sussex Libraries

Single-Aisled Halls in Sussex, by Reginald Thomas Mason, published 1978 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 116, article, pp.155-158) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7197] & The Keep [LIB/500313] & S.A.S. library

Saxon settlements and buildings in Sussex, by Martin Bell, published 1 January 1978 in The South Saxons, edited by P. Brandon (pp.36-53, Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd., ISBN-10: 0850332400 & ISBN-13: 9780850332407) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/501557] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

New Evidence for the Structure and Function of Middle Bronze Age Round Houses in Sussex, by Peter Drewett, published 1979 in The Archaeological Journal (vol. 136, article, pp.3-11)   View Online
Abstract:
Area excavation of five Middle Bronze Age Round Houses at Black Patch, Alcisten, E. Sussex, has conclusively proved that the house terrace itself was a major structural element in the house construction. The position of storage pits and artifacts confirms that the house floor consisted of the whole house terrace. The precise recording of the position of every artifact was used to define activity areas which indicate the possible function of individual houses. From this evidence it is possible to suggest the likely social organisation of the excavated compound.

Architecture and Planting at Goodwood, 1723-1750, by T. P. Connor, published 1979 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 117, article, pp.185-194) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 7497] & The Keep [LIB/500312] & S.A.S. library

Sussex Railway Architecture, by John Hoare, published 15 March 1979 (109 pp., Hassocks: Harvester Press, ISBN-10: 085527249X & ISBN-13: 9780855272494) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15128] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Review by A. J. Haselfoot in Sussex Industrial History, 1979:
An excellent and much-needed historical survey of the railways of Sussex, which, at their greatest extent in 1928, afforded a closely-knit network of communications over the whole of the County. After defining the main aspects of railway architecture the author deals with the development of railways in Sussex from the original. London-Brighton line, authorised in 1837, through their peak in the first quarter of this century, to their subsequent present day decline. The architecture of the two principal early railway companies, the London & Brighton and the South Eastern, is then dealt with followed by a detailed consideration of the several architectural phases which can be identified from the 1850's up to the present day, and the architects and engineers who have influenced their styles. A great deal of research has plainly been undertaken in the writing of this book and the author is to be congratulated on the logical arrangement of his material and the very readable text; a useful and comprehensive classification of stations is a valuable addition. One of the delights of the book is the large number of photographs, both old and new, which illustrate various aspects of the subject, but here I must enter a protest - there are 101 illustrations but none of them are referred to in the text and there is no list of illustrations. This last appears to be a recent gimmick of some publishers and it can be exasperating to the reader - I found myself continuously searching the book to find a picture of the station being described, and which I felt sure I had noticed earlier on. In spite of this criticism the book is well worth possessing, being a first-class record of the architectural history of Sussex railways, much of which has already passed away and which is still disappearing at an alarming rate.

Shoreham Airport Terminal Building, An Architectural Study, by John M. Thornhill, published 1981 (published by the author) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

The Norman Conquest and Church Architecture in Sussex, by J. J. Winterbotham, 1981 at London University (M.Phil. Thesis)

"An Undoubted Jewel": a case study of five Sussex country houses, 1880-1914, by P. Blackwell, published 1981 in Southern History (vol. 3, article, pp.183-200)
The five houses are Petworth House, Goodwood House, Brickwall [in Northiam], Ashburnham Place, and Coombe Place [in Hamsey].

Historic Buildings in Eastern Sussex. Vol 3 - Old Farm Buildings in Eastern Sussex, 1450-1750, by David Martin and Barbara Martin, published 1982 (172 pp., Hastings Area Archaeological Papers, ISBN-10: 0904124088 & ISBN-13: 9780904124088) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Chichester Cathedral: the problem of the Romanesque choir vault, by Martin Andrew, published 1982 in Journal of the British Archaeological Association (vol. 135, article, pp.11-22)   View Online

Gatwick's Beehive: a forgotten development, by John King, published 1982 in Journal, Thirties Society (No. 2, article, pp.25-28)

Vernacular buildings on early maps of the Weald, by E. M. Yates, published 1982 in Ancient Monuments Society (vol. 26, article, pp.210-226)

Stansted Park, Sussex (1); Architects (1902): Arthur C Blomfield, by Clive Aslet, published 11 February 1982 in Country Life (vol. 171 no. 4408, article, pp.346-349)

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: Borough of Crawley, published 1983 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8724]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: District of Mid-Sussex, published 1983 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8725]

Timber Supply and Timber Building in a Sussex Parish, by C. R. J. Currie, published 1983 in Vernacular architecture (vol. 14, article, pp.52-54) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9089]   View Online
Abstract:
This paper questions the commonly held view that the quality and number of timber framed houses in a district reflects the local availability of standing timber. A case history is provided from records and standing buildings of the parish of Warminghurst (Sussex). The settlement history and forms of tenure are summarized. It is then shown from written evidence that, while there was much standing timber in the Middle Ages and later, the policy of landlords from the 15th century, if not earlier, was to treat that timber as their private resource and to encourage tenant builders to re-use material from demolished buildings. That evidence is confirmed by a brief examination of houses and farm buildings surviving from the 15th to the early 18th century.

Housing in Sussex: Affluence and Poverty, by Fred Gray, published 1 September 1983 in Sussex Environment Landscape and Society (pp.250-269, Stroud: Sutton Publishing Ltd., ISBN-10: 0862990459 & ISBN-13: 9780862990459) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 8831] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: District of Arun, published 1984 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9081]

The Making of the Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Design and Drawings, by John Morley, published 1 December 1984 (280 pp., London: Philip Wilson, ISBN-10: 0856671738 & ISBN-13: 9780856671739) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: District of Chichester, published 1985 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9269]

The battle of Bentley Wood; architect (1936) : Serge Chermayeff, by Barbara Tilson, published 1985 in Thirties Society journal (no. 5, article, pp.24-31)

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: District of Chichester, published 1986 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9543]

Hove's Architectural Heritage: Preserving the Past, safeguarding the Future, by Gordon Somerville, published 1986 (52 pp., Evening Argus, ISBN-10: 0861470702 & ISBN-13: 9780861470709) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/502835] & West Sussex Libraries

Flint buildings in and around Eastbourne, by Harold Spears, published 1986 (pamphlet, 31 pp., Eastbourne Local History Society) accessible at: British Library

Horsham Houses. A Study of Early Buildings in a Market Town, by Annabelle Hughes, published 1 January 1986 (xvi + 137 pp., Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd., ISBN-10: 0850336058 & ISBN-13: 9780850336054) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 10257] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

The Tudor lady or bending the ley?; Architect of alterations (1960-1971) Raymond Erith, by Catherine Haig, published April 1986 in House & Garden (vol. 41, no. 4 (419), article, pp.108-117) accessible at: British Library

Moving house: Court Lodge, Groombridge - a successful house transplant , by Geoffrey Clarke, published 30 October 1986 in Country Life (vol. 180 no. 4654, article, pp.1337-1339)

A guide to the buildings of Brighton, by Students and Staff of the School of Architecture and Interior Design, Brighton Polytechnic, published 1987 (152 pp., McMillan Martin, ISBN-10: 1869865030 & ISBN-13: 9781869865030) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

Historic Buildings in Eastern Sussex. Vol 4 - A Selection of Dated Houses in Easteern Sussex, 1450-1750, by David Martin and Barbara Martin, published 1987 (Hastings Area Archaeological Papers)

The Building of Three Streets in Chichester, by Walter Grenaway, published 1987 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 125, historical note, pp.259-262) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9994] & The Keep [LIB/500304] & S.A.S. library

Appendix One: The dating of the proto-palace and palace of Fishbourne, by E.W. Black, published 1 September 1987 in The Roman villas of South-East England (pp.84-87, British Archaeological Reports, ISBN-10: 0860544575 & ISBN-13: 9780860544579) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Appendix Two: The detached bath-building at Angmering, by E.W. Black, published 1 September 1987 in The Roman villas of South-East England (pp.87-89, British Archaeological Reports, ISBN-10: 0860544575 & ISBN-13: 9780860544579) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Appendix Four: The farm at Park Brow, Sussex, by E.W. Black, published 1 September 1987 in The Roman villas of South-East England (pp.96-97, British Archaeological Reports, ISBN-10: 0860544575 & ISBN-13: 9780860544579) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Appendix Six. Southwick Roman villa, by E.W. Black, published 1 September 1987 in The Roman villas of South-East England (pp.102-104, British Archaeological Reports, ISBN-10: 0860544575 & ISBN-13: 9780860544579) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: District of Mid-Sussex, published 1988 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 10140]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: District of Mid-Sussex, published 1988 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 10140]

List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest: District of Chichester, published 1988 (Department of Environment) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 9979]

The Evolution and Ownership of Timber-framed Houses within the Old Parish and Market Catchment Area of Horsham, circa 1300-1650, by Annabelle Hughes, published 1988 (2 volumes, University of Sussex) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

Twelfth Century Church Architecture in Sussex, by Richard Roberts, published 1988 (Lewes: Book Guild, ISBN-13: 9780863322778) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Recording and Interpreting a Farm Building: Turks Farm Oast, Mayfield, East Sussex, by Gwen Jones and John Bell, published 1988 in The Historic Farm Buildings Group (vol. 2, article, pp.3-14)
Abstract:
Detailed analysis of an 1827 oast on an East Sussex farm

Building Practices in the Eastern Weald around 1700, by John H. Farrant, published 1988 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 126, historical note, pp.248-251) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 10371] & The Keep [LIB/500303] & S.A.S. library

Slate Roofing in Medieval Sussex - a Reappraisal, by Eric W. Holden, published 1989 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 127, article, pp.73-88) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 10604] & The Keep [LIB/500302] & S.A.S. library

Historic Buildings in Eastern Sussex. Vol 5 - Domestic Building in the Eastern High Weald 1300-1750. Part 1 Wall Construction, by David Martin and Barbara Martin, published 1 February 1989 (142 pp., Hastings Area Archaeological Papers, ISBN-10: 090412410X & ISBN-13: 9780904124101) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Tolling the bell for Brighton, by Kenneth Powell, published 16 March 1989 in Country Life (vol. 183 no. 11, article, pp.108-111)

Brighton in Crisis, by David Lloyd and others, published 1990 (20 pp., London: Georgian Group, Victorian Society, ISBN-13: 9780901567154) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Wealden buildings: studies in the timber-framed tradition of building in Kent, Sussex and Surrey in tribute to R.T. Mason, edited by John Warren, published 1990 (xi + 232 pp., Horsham: Coach Publishing, ISBN-10: 0902608061 & ISBN-13: 9780902608061) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Land tenure and Medieval housing in the Western Weald, by Annabelle Palmer, published 1990 in Wealden buildings: studies in the timber-framed tradition of building in Kent, Sussex, and Surrey: in tribute to R.T. Mason (pp.61-72, Horsham: Coach Publishing, ISBN-10: 0902608061 & ISBN-13: 9780902608061) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Farm buildings in the Eastern High Weald, by David and Barbara Martin, published 1990 in Wealden buildings: studies in the timber-framed tradition of building in Kent, Sussex, and Surrey: in tribute to R.T. Mason (pp.127-143, Horsham: Coach Publishing, ISBN-10: 0902608061 & ISBN-13: 9780902608061) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Barns of the High Weald, by Kay Coutin and Margaret Holt, published 1990 in Wealden buildings: studies in the timber-framed tradition of building in Kent, Sussex, and Surrey: in tribute to R.T. Mason (pp.145-153, Horsham: Coach Publishing, ISBN-10: 0902608061 & ISBN-13: 9780902608061) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Farm buildings: a parish study in the Western Weald [Warnham], by Rodney Dales, published 1990 in Wealden buildings: studies in the timber-framed tradition of building in Kent, Sussex, and Surrey: in tribute to R.T. Mason (pp.155-169, Horsham: Coach Publishing, ISBN-10: 0902608061 & ISBN-13: 9780902608061) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Augustus Pugin Versus Decimus Burton: A Victorian Architectural Duel, by Guy Williams, published 3 May 1990 (160 pp., London: Cassell Illustrated, ISBN-10: 0304315613 & ISBN-13: 9780304315611) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
An entertaining account of the personal and professional rivalry between two outstanding 19th-century architects - Decimus Burton, society figure and exponent of the classical style of architecture, and Augustus Pugin, a fervent advocate of the neo-gothic.

George Devey architect, 1820-1886, by Jill Allibone, published 1991 (224 pp., Cambridge: Lutterworth Press, ISBN-10: 0718827856 & ISBN-13: 9780718827854) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Little has hitherto been written about George Devey, yet his contribution to the vernacular revival which took place in the 1860s was important and innovative. He was the first architect to apply the Wealden style to cottages and small estate buildings, and to use the Flemish manner found in east Kent and East Anglia in combination with the Jacobean for his mansions, whether in town or country, anticipating architects such as Richard Norman Shaw and William Eden Nesfield by at least ten years. His interest in the use of local materials directly contributed to the emergence of the Arts and Crafts Movement and thereby to the model for British middle-class housing up to the Second World War.

Historic Buildings in Eastern Sussex. Vol 6 - Domestic Building in the Eastern High Weald, 1300-1750, by David Martin and Barbara Martin, published 1991 (vii + 188 pp., Hastings Area Archaeological Papers, ISBN-10: 0904124118 & ISBN-13: 9780904124118) accessible at: East Sussex Libraries

The nave of Saint Andrew at Steyning: a study of variety in design in twelfth-century architecture in Britain, by Malcolm Thurlby and Yoshio Kusaba, published 1991 in Gesta (vol. 30, no. 2, article, pp.163-175)

Laughton Place: A Manorial and Architectural History, with an account of recent Restoration and Excavation, by John H. Farrant and Others, published 1991 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 129, article, pp.99-164) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 11694] & The Keep [LIB/500295] & S.A.S. library

Christopher Tunnard at Bentley Wood; Architects: Serge Chermayeff, landscape architect Christopher Tunnard, by Ian Kitson, published January 1991 in Landscape Design, the journal of the Landscape Institute (no. 196, article, pp.10-15) accessible at: British Library

The Nave of Saint Andrew at Steyning: A Study of Variety in Design in Twelfth-Century Architecture in Britain, by Malcolm Thurlby and Yoshio Kusaba, published January 1991 in Gesta (vol. 30, no. 2, article, pp.163-175)

C. A. Busby: the Regency Architect of Brighton and Hove, by Neil Bingham, published 31 December 1991 (106 pp., R.I.B.A. Heinz Gallery, ISBN-10: 1872911102 & ISBN-13: 9781872911106) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/503774] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

Aspects of building construction within the eastern High Weald of Sussex, by D. Martin, D. F. Stenning and D. D. Andrews, published 1994 in Cressing Conference (article, pp.74-78)

Petworth, by Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd and Christopher Simon Sykes, published 10 October 1994 in Great Houses of England & Wales (article, pp.260-274, Laurence King, ISBN-10: 1856690539 & ISBN-13: 9781856690539) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

Uppark, West Sussex, by Richard Haslam, published 25 May 1995 in Country Life (vol. 189 no. 21, article, pp.68-73)

Thomas Cubitt: Master Builder, by Hermione Hobhouse, published October 1995 (2nd revised edition, 656 pp., Mercury Business Books, ISBN-10: 1852511486 & ISBN-13: 9781852511487) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

The development of timber-framed buildings in the Sussex Weald: the architectural heritage of the parish of Rudgwick, by Diana Chatwin, published 1996 (vii & 232 pp., Rudgwick Preservation Society, ISBN-10: 0907264999 & ISBN-13: 9780907264996) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 13362] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Listed Buildings in Easebourne as at 1996. (Grade II and Grade I), published April 1996 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 8 Number 3, article, pp.9-11, Spring 1996) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15968]
Abstract:
Detailed Listed Buildings in Easebourne as at Spring 1996.

Detached Kitchens in Eastern Sussex: A Re-assessment of the Evidence, by David Martin and Barbara Martin, published 1997 in Vernacular Architecture (vol. 28, article, pp.85-91) accessible at: British Library   View Online
Abstract:
It can be demonstrated that, after houses and barns, detached kitchens were once the most common building type present in the landscape of south-east England, yet today very few examples survive. Those which do mainly date from the period 1450-1550 and are surprisingly large and complex. They range in length from two to four bays and usually have more than one ground floor room and at least one, and often two or more upper chambers. Although all incorporate non-standard features, in general appearance the surviving examples closely resemble small houses. It is often only their location, close to the rear of a main house of more standard layout, which indicates their true function. Documentary evidence suggests that, in addition to the kitchen itself, the buildings housed such service rooms as bakehouses, and milkhouses. The upper chambers gave extra storage and accommodation.
It should be stressed that those kitchens which survive are likely to represent the larger, more elaborate examples. Many of those which have been lost may have been nothing more than single-roomed, single-storeyed outhouses. Yet the fact cannot be ignored that there would have been a considerable difference in status between those households with, and those without detached kitchens, despite the surviving houses being of similar size and layout. The importance of the detached kitchen in relation to vernacular studies should not be underestimated.

The Lost Mansion of Great Todham, by F J-D [Mrs D.V.F Johnson-Davies], published April 1997 in Midhurst Magazine (Volume 9 Number 3, article, pp.8-12, Spring 1997) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 15969]
Abstract:
Short history of the medieval manor house at Great Todham, which was demolished in the early 19th century. Contains depictions of the decorated ceilings, and information as to how this information has been preserved.

English modern houses in the 30's. 2. 'Bentley Wood', near Halland, Sussex, 1938; Architects: Serge Chermayeff, by Toshika Kinoshita, published September 1997 in A&U (no. 8 (324), article, pp.3-9) accessible at: British Library

William Hallett of Brighton, by A. B. Warrick, published September 1997 in Sussex Family Historian (vol. 12 no. 7, article, pp.265-266) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14879] & The Keep [LIB/508814] & CD SFH40 from S.F.H.G.
Preview:
The life of William Hallett (c.1773-1862) who was one of the pioneers, a small phalanx of builders, who set themselves to develop Brighthelmston at the time when George IV had begun to reign.

Uppark: Sir Matthew Fetherstonhaugh's first architect, by Richard Hewlings, published 1998 in The Georgian Group Journal (vol. VIII, article, pp.114-121) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 13942]

Brighton Station - an architectural and historical appraisal, by Keith Leicester and Ron Martin, published 1998 in Sussex Industrial History (issue no. 28, article, pp.4-11, ISSN: 0263-5151) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/506527]   Download PDF
Abstract:
The London and Brighton Railway Act was passed in 1837 authorising the London and Brighton Railway Company to construct a route with branches both to Shoreham in the west and to Lewes and Newhaven in the east. Construction was commenced in 1838 and in July 1841 the track was opened from London to Haywards Heath and extended to Brighton in September 1841. The Shoreham branch had opened earlier in May, 1840 and the branch to Lewes and Newhaven was to open in December, 1847. The London and Brighton Railway Company combined with the London and Croydon Railway Company in 1846 to form the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (LB&SCR).

Flint buildings in West Sussex, compiled by Brian Dawson, published 1 January 1998 (pamphlet, 64 pp., West Sussex County Council Planning Department, ISBN-10: 0862604214 & ISBN-13: 9780862604219) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 13779] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

Building the Georgian City, by James Ayres, published 9 September 1998 (286 pp., Yale University Press, ISBN-10: 0300075480 & ISBN-13: 9780300075489)
Abstract:
Georgian architecture had its roots in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Out of that disaster grew the need for rapid redevelopment which was accomplished through standardization and the relaxation of restrictive practices in the building trades. This book investigates the decline in crafted buildings of the traditional client economies and the introduction of mass produced components which characterizeed an emerging consumerism. It is an approach which offers insights into our architectural heritiage by focusing on the traditions and innovations in the building methods of the time - the construction processes, the role of the building craftsmen, and the tools and materials they used. James Ayres describes how builders in London developed the terraced house and town centre building systems which influenced the architecture of Bath, Edinburgh, Dublin and distant Philadelphia. He takes us through the building processes craft by craft, from the work of the surveyors and labourers who established the foundations to the joiners and painters who finished the interiors. Ayres outlines the ways in which forms do not only follow functions but are also conditioned by materials and methods. He describes how, with the burgeoning industrialization of the second half of the 18th century, a separation emerged between making and designing, a division which led to the decline of the craftsman as designer. This led to a shift in power, a move from the empirical understanding of those involved in the processes of making to the theoretically based activities of architects.

Building review: the revolutionary East Sussex hospital for the elderly that is improving its patients quality of life, published 23 October 1998 in Building (article, pp.36-43)

The timber framed houses of Ardingly, compiled by Jean Shelley, published 1999 (40 pp., published by the author) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/501784] & British Library & West Sussex Libraries

Timber-Framed Buildings, by Annabelle Hughes and David Martin, published 1 January 1999 in An Historical Atlas of Sussex (pp.60-61, Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd, ISBN-10: 1860771122 & ISBN-13: 9781860771125) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14026][Lib 18777] & The Keep [LIB/501686][LIB/508903] & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The buildings of England. West Kent and the Weald, by John Newman, published June 1999 (new edition, 688 pp., Penguin, ISBN-10: 0140710388 & ISBN-13: 9780140710380) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Classical sculpture and the English interior, 1640-1840: purpose and meaning, by Ruth A. Guilding, 2000 at Bristol University (Ph.D. thesis)
Abstract:
The 2nd Earl of Arundel was the first English collector to imitate directly Italian Renaissance collections, creating sculpture displays in Arundel House and its gardens in the 1640s which became famous throughout Europe . Translated into the quasi-domestic context, classical sculpture represented the veneration of the cultural and political mores of ancient Rome and Greece, the props and justification of political power, but could also be portrayed as an inspirational 'body of history' augmenting civic culture, as 'national treasure' and exemplars for the improvement of the arts, carrying the onus of granting opportunities for their public consumption . Arundel's displays were piously recreated, at Wilton House, Easton Neston and the University of Oxford, but subsequent collectors adopted the Palladian format, based on Roman architectural vocabulary, as the convention for display until c.1760 . Dependent on symmetry and niche architecture, Palladian displays required full-length statues, or copies and casts of the best works in the antique canon. Outside the context of the 'atrium'/entrance hall. where busts and statues could stand as putative ancestors, sculpture continued to hold the same resonances, but in these controlled and formalised settings its significance could be diminished to that of grand furniture. The more intensive antiquarianism of the Enlightenment gradually eclipsed such resonances. From the 1760s, tastes broadened to encompass the works of Piranesi, inscriptions, funerary sculpture, and non-classical antiquities, placed in 'Museum' room displays . In the last full-blown aristocratic galleries, at Castle Howard, Woburn, Petworth and Chatsworth, between 1800-c.1840, marble antiquities were juxtaposed with modern sculpture, to convey a political message, or as antique exemplars. The cachet of ownership increased: Charles Townley's reputation was entirely vested in his antique marbles; his housemuseum at Park Street acquired a quasi-public status, becoming the model for the first public sculpture galleries, when his marbles were bought by the British Museum.

End reversal during the conversion of medieval houses in Sussex, by David Martin, published 2000 in Vernacular Architecture (vol. 31, article, pp.26-31) accessible at: British Library   View Online
Abstract:
When in the post-medieval period chimneys and first floors were inserted into medieval open halls, the uses to which the rooms beyond the hall were put was reversed in a number of examples in southern England. In these, those rooms which had previously fulfilled a service function were now converted into a parlour, whilst the old parlour was down-graded to service use. Although there are occasional exceptions, the phenomenon usually occurs only in those houses where an axial chimney of three or more flues was to be inserted and one of the new fireplaces was intended to serve an end parlour. Obviously such a fundamental redesign of a building would not have been undertaken unless the modifications offered very real economic or functional advantages for the owner. This paper uses examples from East Sussex to explain why, in Sussex at least, such changes were carried out. It demonstrates that the changes were the result of a two-stage modernisation of medieval houses and reveals the need for caution in seeking a mechanism to explain such phenomena, for what at first seem the obvious reasons might, upon further research, prove to be only a small part of the story.

Biagio and John Biagio Rebecca: a sketch towards a biography. Part 1, Text, and Part 2..., by Michael W. D. Norman, published 2001 (pamphlet, published by the author) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14678] & The Keep [LIB/502312][Lib/502313] & West Sussex Libraries

Two Sussex examples of the contribution documentary sources can make to the study of buildings, by Annabelle Hughes, published 2001 in Vernacular Architecture (vol. 32, article, pp.48-53)   View Online
Abstract:
Specialists and students of vernacular architecture alike must have welcomed a paper by David and Barbara Martin using the evidence from their comprehensive research in the rape of Hastings to establish the reasons for alterations and additions to medieval and transitional houses. Examples of this phenomenon have increasingly been recognised as more assiduous fieldwork is carried out, compelling a re-evaluation of historical generalisations.
Over the last decade, it has been very encouraging to see the moves towards greater cooperation and sharing of knowledge between different fields of historical investigation - historians, archaeologists, geographers - and the acceptance of the study of vernacular architecture. Because the latter has been a comparative newcomer, many of those involved were drawn from a varied range of disciplines, and this has probably been something of a catalyst in the movement towards greater integration.
Given below are two particular examples of the way that an interpretation of historical structure and local documentary research can be brought together to illuminate and enlarge upon an understanding of each other.

East Grinstead, West Sussex Dendrochronology Project, by D. H. Miles and M. J. Worthington, published 2001 in Vernacular Architecture (vol. 32, article, pp.84-86)   View Online

Chimney Cowls with particular reference to Brighton, by John Redfern, published 2001 in Sussex Industrial History (issue no. 31, article, pp.2-8, ISSN: 0263-5151) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/506529]   Download PDF
Abstract:
Wind figured largely in the domestic and economic fortunes of seaside towns, and Brighton with its long history of fishing, seaside therapy, varied attractions and thriving social life was no exception. As Brighton expanded and houses appeared on the banks and steep slopes on either side of The Steine, mostly in close proximity and at the same time rising in narrow steps one behind another, problems arose, particularly in the area of heating and in venting the smoke and fumes that came with it. It was here that the very wind, that frequently caused rooms to be almost uninhabitable, was harnessed to provide the remedy for the nuisance of which it was the main cause. A diversity of unique cowls and smoke cures was developed to ameliorate the problem of the vagarious currents of air that the complex developments promoted and the stiff winds that are a feature of our coastline. What is now an almost forgotten industry came into its own. It could be said that this 'hidden' industry produced a range and number of essential artefacts over a period of many years that could rival the output of any similar enterprise in the town to date. There have always been cowls on the scene. Charles I is said to have granted a patent to the inventor of a rotating smoke cure (probably a "Lobster Back") and there are earlier references to creaking apparatus on the chimney. Prince Albert applied his considerable engineering talents to the chimneys of Osborne. It is said that on the night of his death the cowls that he had designed roared and ground in the vicious tempest that assailed the house. Chimney cowls, (the word derives from the Latin cucullus: a hood), became an established and profitable industry early in the nineteenth century when a plethora of shapes, shafts and erections appeared almost overnight. For the Victorians decoration, even on the heights of the house, exemplified in these artefacts the principle that anything on which time, trouble and money had been expended should be decorous and effective and should be seen to be so.

The supply and utilisation of vernacular building timber in the rural Sussex Weald 1500-1800. , by Jayne Claudia Kirk, 2001 at Sussex University (Ph.D. thesis)

Bending the rules Raising a Sussex museum's huge and fragile timber gridshell roof, published 18 May 2001 in Building (article, pp.68-77) accessible at: British Library

Conservation piece: How the UK's first timbergridshell was lowered into place at a Sussex museum, published 13 October 2001 in Building (article, pp.50-52) accessible at: British Library

Horsham Area Dendrochronology Project, by Daniel Miles and Michael Worthington, published 2002 in Vernacular Architecture (vol. 33, article, pp.99-101)   View Online

Deco style on the Downs: Meadowfield Adult Acute Unit; Architects: Nightingale Associates, by Christopher Shaw, published January 2002 in Hospital development (article, pp.18-24) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library
Abstract:
A new mental health unit on the South Downs that shows the fruits of the architect's efforts to create a hotel-like environment

How David Mackay plans to bring a touch of Barcelona to Hastings and Bexhill, published 19 April 2002 in Building (Issue 1262, article, pp.30-37)

Chichester Council House, by Barry Fletcher, published 1 May 2002 (booklet, iv + 53 pp., Chichester City Council, ISBN-10: 0954225201 & ISBN-13: 9780954225209) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 14810] & R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

West Sussex Barns and Farm Buildings, by Annabelle Hughes and photographs by David Johnston, published 1 October 2002 (121 pp., The Dovecote Press, ISBN-10: 1904349005 & ISBN-13: 9781904349006) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries

Early Houses of Rusper 1400-1840, by Jean Shelley, published 2003 (published by the author) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

Brighton and Hove's brief-less Black Rock project, published 2003 in Architects' journal (vol. 218, part 14, article, pp.22-23)

Variation in the survival rate of timber-framed buildings in two Sussex parishes, by Diana Chatwin, published 2003 in Vernacular architecture (vol. 34, article, pp.32-36) accessible at: British Library   View Online
Abstract:
During the recording of the timber-framed houses in the adjacent parishes of Slinfold and Rudgwick, it became evident that there was a significant difference in the survival rate of houses in the two parishes. There are eighty-nine surviving timber-framed houses of all ages in Rudgwick, but only forty-five in Slinfold. Allowing for the smaller acreage of Slinfold parish, this gives 14.8 houses per 1000 acres in Rudgwick, compared with 10.6 for Slinfold. This article seeks to explain why this may be so, and also places the survival rates for these two parishes within the wider context of those for other West Sussex parishes.

The configuration of inner Rooms and chambers in the transitional houses of Eastern Sussex, by David Martin, published 2003 in Vernacular Architecture (vol. 34, article, pp.37-51) accessible at: British Library   View Online
Abstract:
Using a tool known as planning analysis, this paper explores the relationship between the first-floor chambers within a group of transitional houses within East Sussex for which the internal communications can be reconstructed. It demonstrates that the chambers in these houses were organised into ?suites' of connected rooms, suggesting that very specific uses were intended. In this, the article poses questions rather than provides answers.

The Making of the Royal Pavilion, Brighton: Design and Drawings, by John Morley, published 21 November 2003 (reprint, 280 pp., London: Philip Wilson, ISBN-10: 0856675571 & ISBN-13: 9780856675577) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
The Royal Pavilion, Brighton, is one of the most famous and opulent royal extravaganzas in existence. First built in 1787 for the Prince of Wales as a neo-classical marine villa, by the time the Prince became king in 1820 it had grown into the extraordinary Indian-Chinese fantasy that it is today. This study reproduces all of the important surviving designs, for the exterior and interior of the Pavilion, revealing the great variety of brilliant exotic schemes devised for its construction and decoration. The projects for the exterior include the pretty but chaste designs of Henry Holland and the wilder Indian and Chinese fantasies of William Pordent and Humphry. The interior designs are often astonishing; they include schemes for whole rooms as well as for individual details such as windows, skylights, doorways, carpets and curtains.

Butts Cottage, Kirdford: The Conversion of Trees to Timber in The Rural Sussex Weald, by J. C. Kirk, published 2004 in Vernacular Architecture (vol. 35, article, pp.12-20) accessible at: British Library   View Online
Abstract:
In 1972, VA published an account of Oliver Rackham's survey of a late medieval timber-framed house at Stanton, West Suffolk, in which he deduced from the surviving structure the amount of timber the original had required, its cost, and how many trees of varying ages and sizes had been used to build it. Following the example of Rackham's work, a similar survey of a typical sixteenth-century timber-framed house in the Sussex Weald was carried out, which has not only revealed striking differences between the two regions in the type of trees used and the way in which they were worked, but also valuable information about the early-modern Wealden landscape and contemporary utilisation of its resources.

An Early Vernacular Hammer-Beam Structure: Imberhorne Farm Cottages, East Grinstead, West Sussex, by J. Clarke, published 2005 in Vernacular architecture (vol. 36, article, pp.32-40) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/501316] & British Library   View Online
Abstract:
Imberhorne Farm Cottages 1-3 (TQ 373384) are, from the exterior, Victorian farm-workers' cottages. The outward appearance, however, hides the impressive remains of Imberhorne Manor House, containing an early archbraced false hammer-beam roof, tree-ring dated to 1428. The structure is compared to other surviving arch-braced examples and shows strongest similarities to the design of Westminster Hall, but lacking its elaborate mouldings and sculpture. The lack of adornment enables the detail of the design to be determined, showing considerable strengthening of the braces and retention of the hammer beam and post as single elements undivided by the arch. The construction of such a building within thirty years of the completion of Westminster Hall makes this property particularly important within the milieu of the developing structure of the arch-braced hammer beam, and demonstrates the influence of Westminster Hall in a vernacular context.

Swanbourne Pump House, Arundel - an architectural appraisal, by Ron Martin, published 2005 in Sussex Industrial History (issue no. 35, article, pp.14-19, ISSN: 0263-5151) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/506533]   Download PDF
Abstract:
In Sussex Industrial History No. 34, Tony Baxter covers the history of the site and the description of the machinery of the Swanbourne Pump House. This article is concerned mainly with the building and its environment and the possible design of the water wheel, which preceded the turbine. For the purpose of description in this article the side of the pump house facing the tail pond is deemed to face due east.

Structural Development of Sussex Churches, by J. L. Denman, published 1 January 2005 (224 pp., Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd, ISBN-10: 0850330866 & ISBN-13: 9780850330861)

Sussex stones : the story of Horsham stone and Sussex marble, by Roger Birch, published 1 October 2005 (64 pp., published by the author, ISBN-10: 0955125901 & ISBN-13: 9780955125904) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

De La Warr pavilion: the modernist masterpiece, by Alastair Fairley, published 2006 (172 pp., London: Merrell, ISBN-10: 1858942837 & ISBN-13: 9781858942834) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
The De La Warr Pavilion on the south coast of England is an important piece of British modern movement architecture. This text tells the fascinating story of the pavilion's genesis, construction, post-war decline and recent restoration, and celebrates its new life as a vibrant cultural centre.

East Beach Cafe: Thomas Heatherwick's first completed building will be a small cafe on the south coast at Littlehampton, by P. Kelly, published 2006 in Blueprint: the magazine of design and architecture (no. 248, article, pp.70-77) accessible at: British Library

Red-and-Black Painted Medieval Architecture: St Mary's Church, New Shoreham, Sussex, by Giles Standing and Catherine Hassall, published 2006 in The Archaeological Journal (vol. 163, article, pp.92-121)   View Online
Abstract:
Recent survey of the late twelfth- to early thirteenth-century chancel of St Mary's church, New Shoreham (Grade I listed) has revealed traces of two consecutive medieval paint schemes on the architecture, dating from c. 1210. No previous research or publication has taken account of these remains, which indicate the original interior appearance of this large and historic parish church. Samples of the paint have been scientifically analysed, revealing the pigments used and their stratigraphic relationship across the survey area; the identification of carbon black on architectural features is particularly important. Comparison with other ecclesiastical buildings in England and on the Continent indicates that St Mary's chancel is a key example of a widespread decorative scheme of red-and-black architectural polychromy, reinforcing its significance as an exemplar of early Gothic style in medieval England.

Ancient and Modern: How The Downland Gridshell, an elaborate Timber Grid Dish Construction in the Weald and Downland Open-Air Museum in Sussex, was constructed using Bentley's STAAD.Pro, published 2007 in CAD user (vol. 20, no. 9, article, pp.26-28) accessible at: British Library

Beach cafe, Littlehampton, West Sussex: Heatherwick Studio, published 2007 in The Architectural review (no. 1330, article, pp.50-51) accessible at: British Library

New Classical Houses in an English Arcadia, by Clive Fewins, published 5 July 2007 in Country Life (vol. 201 no. 27, article, pp.112-115) accessible at: British Library
Clive Fewins examines the work of architect Stephen Langer in the Weald of Kent and Sussex, inspired by the local vernacular

The Building of Georgian Chichester, by Alan H. J. Green, published 1 October 2007 (Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd., ISBN-10: 1860774563 & ISBN-13: 9781860774560) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Horsham stone roofs, by Terry G. Hughes, published 2008 (14 pp., Caernarfon: Stone Roofing Association) accessible at: British Library

Historic Houses of East Sussex & Their Owners, by Viscountess Wolseley, published 2008 (353 pp., Country Books Ashridge Press, ISBN-10: 190121494X & ISBN-13: 9781901214949) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Frances Garnet Wolseley was born in London in 1872. She was very much a countrywoman who loved both hunting and taking long solitary walks with her dogs. Early in 1898 the Wolseleys rented Glynde Place and she had by then trained as a gardener. In 1903 her mother saw an advertisement placed by a lady gardener who was in 'distressed circumstances' and engaged her. Her employment then sparked the idea of founding a school for lady gardeners.
Arthur Beckett founded the Sussex County Magazine in December 1926 and asked her to contribute a series entitled Historic Houses of Sussex. Over the years that followed she described 115 houses, the last four articles appearing posthumously. In Myth and Memory she declared that she would always be glad that she had been chosen to write the series for it enabled her to spend her summers exploring the county she loved looking at fascinating houses. In winter she did her research. This book contains the articles she wrote between 1926 and 1935 on East Sussex. (West Sussex Historic Houses & their Owners is published by Country Books in two companion volumes.)
This book should prove invaluable for the lover of old Sussex houses, and with an index of family names, for those tracing their family tree. The very fact that she was a viscountess, opened doors to her. Several of these old buildings had been reduced to farm houses. Many of them are still in private hands - where circumstances have changed, they are mentioned at the end of each article.
Review by Juliet Clarke in Sussex Past and Present no. 117, April 2009:
These two volumes contain articles first published in the Sussex County Magazine between 1926 and 1935. Professional researchers have long known of them as a resource and will welcome this re-print in collected form. New readers - or browsers, since these are big books - should find them rewarding.
Viscountess Frances Wolseley, when in her mid-forties and then best known for her books on gardening, was to develop an abiding interest in historic Sussex buildings. Largely self-taught, and putting her privileged background to good use, she was able to communicate her enthusiasm in a mix of well-researched history, structural observation, country lore, horticultural notes, and personal comment.

Historic Houses of West Sussex & Their Owners, by Viscountess Wolseley, published 2008 (Country Books Ashridge Press, ISBN-10: 1906789045 & ISBN-13: 9781906789046) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries
Review by Juliet Clarke in Sussex Past and Present no. 117, April 2009:
These two volumes contain articles first published in the Sussex County Magazine between 1926 and 1935. Professional researchers have long known of them as a resource and will welcome this re-print in collected form. New readers - or browsers, since these are big books - should find them rewarding.
Viscountess Frances Wolseley, when in her mid-forties and then best known for her books on gardening, was to develop an abiding interest in historic Sussex buildings. Largely self-taught, and putting her privileged background to good use, she was able to communicate her enthusiasm in a mix of well-researched history, structural observation, country lore, horticultural notes, and personal comment.

The Victorian Development of the Clifton, Montpelier and Powis Estates of Brighton, by Steve Myall, published 6 October 2008 (187 pp., Lewes: Pomegranate Press, ISBN-10: 0955900603 & ISBN-13: 9780955900600) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/508918] & British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

Pevsner Architectural Guides: Brighton and Hove, by Nicholas Antram and Richard Morrice, published 3 November 2008 (256 pp., Yale University Press, ISBN-10: 0300126611 & ISBN-13: 9780300126617) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
This book is the first comprehensive guide to the historic heart of Brighton and Hove, the greatest of England's seaside resorts. A series of walks trace its development from late medieval fishing settlement to the "Queen of the Watering Places," with a lively and critical commentary on its unique architectural character. Few cities can boast such an exotic diversity of buildings, from the outlandish Pavilion, playground of the Prince Regent, to genteel squares and terraces, Victorian architecture both serious and whimsical and landmarks of twentieth century modernism.
Review by Colin Brent in Sussex Past and Present no. 116, December 2008:
This marvellous paperback expands, but also preserves, Pevsner's pioneering guide to inner Brighton and Hove, part of his Sussex volume published in 1965. The authors chart the city's evolving social and economic life, and the architects and developers who responded to it. They examine major monuments - the Pavilion, the Dome, St. Michael's, St Bartholomew's, All Saints, The Pier, Brighton Railway Station and the Jubilee Library. Twelve walks traverse the city roughly to its Edwardian boundaries, from the seafront out to Montpelier, Preston Village, London and Lewes Roads and Queen's Park. Interspersed are discrete paragraphs on Building Materials, Bows and Bays, the West Pier, Orientalism (Chinese and Indian), Sea Bathing, Anglican Ritualism, Magnus Volk etc. All is accurate and acute, succinct and accessible.

St. Mary's Church Broadwater, Worthing, West Sussex, published 2009 in Church Building (Issue 119, article)
Abstract:
As part of the re-ordering of this Medieval Grade I listed Church, Canterbury-based architects, Lee Evans Partnership, in collaboration with JUPITER Heating Systems Ltd, has developed a pioneering dry flooring system which could revolutionise the approach to flooring installation in historic and listed buildings

Friary church of St Francis and St Anthony Crawley, published 2009 in Church Building and Heritage Review (Issue 120, article, pp.10-15)

Sussex Best Houses, by Simon Jenkins, published 2009 in England's thousand best houses (article, pp.742-793, London: Penguin Books, ISBN-13: 9780141039299) accessible at: British Library

The builder of Penhurst manor house, by Jeremy Goring, published 2009 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 147, article, pp.135-145) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 17254] & The Keep [LIB/500365] & S.A.S. library   View Online
Abstract:
This article aims to explain how a Sussex clergyman of relatively humble birth came to acquire a considerable landed estate - and why, as a childless old man, he chose to build upon it a fine house that he probably knew he would not live in for long. The strange story of John Gyles throws light on economic, social and religious developments in eastern Sussex in the first half of the seventeenth century and may serve to modify a number of popular assumptions.

Behind the façade: an architect at large, by John Wells-Thorpe, published 29 October 2009 (423 pp., Brighton: Book Guild Publishing, ISBN-10: 1846243750 & ISBN-13: 9781846243752) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Behind the Façade is an architectural autobiography, but it is less about buildings and more about how they are 'peopled'. The life of a building and what goes on in it carries as much weight as its appearance.
In his wide-ranging career, John Wells-Thorpe has designed more than £65 million worth of building projects in the UK and overseas. Excelling at art from an early age, it was almost natural that John should become an architect, and he studied at the School of Architecture in Brighton before winning an award to study in Rome - where the young student, faced with modern Italian design in a historic city, felt like a child in the world's best toy shop.
Work in all five continents over the following years included a 'relocatable church', a TV studio in the Arabian desert, financial headquarters abutting St Paul's Cathedral and an environmental impact study for a mangrove swamp in Malaysia. Dealing with Margaret Thatcher, Donald Soper, Anita Roddick,. Sir Kenneth Clark, Cleo Laine, The Duke of Gloucester and Margaret Atwood along the way, John Wells-Thorpe has encountered many characters, and shares his impressions of them with wit and vivid observations.

St Andrew's Furnace Green, Crawley, by D. O'Donoghue, published 2010 in Church Building and Heritage Review (Issue 126, article, pp.22-25)

The Distribution and Dating of Wealden Houses, by Nat Alcock, published 2010 in Vernacular architecture (vol. 41, article, pp.37-44)   View Online
Abstract:
A gazetteer of Wealden houses has been compiled from information provided by Vernacular Architecture Group members. The locations of the houses are mapped and correlated with settlement character, and the distinction between rural and urban Wealden houses reiterated. The forty Wealden houses dated by dendrochronology are also mapped and discussed.

The construction of St Peter's Church, Brighton, c.1818-1835, by Sue Berry, published 2010 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 148, article, pp.203-212) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 18613] & The Keep [LIB/500366] & S.A.S. library   View Online
Abstract:
St Peter's church is a landmark in the City of Brighton and Hove. It is the focal point of the view northwards from the Royal Pavilion. Charles Barry, architect of the Houses of Parliament, designed it in the fashionable Gothic style. The parish Vestry knew that the old parish church was too small. It agreed to the suggestion of a new church (rather than extending the old one) because of the offer of land by Thomas Read Kemp and by the prospect of funding by the Church Building Commission. The Church Building Committee's management of the financial records on behalf of the parish was poor. The parish argued with the Commission and lost a court case brought against them for repayment of a loan.

Building History: Weald & Downland Open Air Museum 1970-2010 the First 40 Years, by Richard Harris, Kim C. Leslie, Carol Brinson and edited by Diana Zeuner, published 10 November 2010 (200 pp., Weald & Downland Open Air Museum, ISBN-10: 0905259300 & ISBN-13: 9780905259307) accessible at: British Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

The regulation of cottage building in seventeenth-century Sussex, by Danae Tankard, published 2011 in Agricultural History Review (vol. 59, no. 1, article, pp.18-35)   Download PDF
Abstract:
In 1589 a statute was passed entitled 'An act against erecting and maintaining cottages' which sought to regulate cottage building and the multiple occupation of cottages. This article examines the context of the act's passage and its relationship to other legislation of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century. It then offers a detailed exploration of the way the act's cottage clauses were enforced in seventeenth-century Sussex. It also considers the legal status of cottages that were 'continued' and looks at evidence for methods of cottage construction and the range of cottage types.

Hastings' latest efforts to revive its attractions come in the shape of the darkly gleaming Jerwood gallery, squarely deposited between the cliffs and the sea by small practice HAT Projects, published 2011 in RIBA Journal (vol. 118, no. 6, article, pp.53-60)

Is arts-led regeneration working in our seaside towns? Fred Gray looks at the latest example, the Jerwood Gallery in Hastings by HAT Projects with community facilities, by T. Ronalds, published 2012 in Architecture Today (No. 227, article, pp.42-51)

Building study Jerwood Gallery in Hastings by HAT Projects, published 2012 in Architects' Journal (vol. 235, no. 15, article, pp.44-50)

James and Decimus Burton's Regency New Town at St Leonards-on-Sea, 1827-37, by Elizabeth Nathaniels, published 2012 in The Georgian Group Journal (vol. XX, article, pp.151-170)

A new vaulting technique for early baths in Sussex: the anatomy of a Romano-British invention, by Lynne C. Lancaster, published 2012 in Journal of Roman Archaeology (vol. 25, article, pp.419-440)

The Georgian provincial builder-architect and architect: Amon and Amon Henry Wilds of Lewes and Brighton, c. 1790-1850, by Sue Berry, published 2012 in Sussex Archæological Collections (vol. 150, article, pp.162-183) accessible at: W.S.R.O. [Lib 18615] & The Keep [LIB/500368] & S.A.S. library   View Online
Abstract:
Provincial builders and architects designed the majority of urban buildings during the eighteenth and first half of the nineteenth centuries and therefore deserve study. Some, such as James Essex (1722-84), Owen Browne Carter (1806-1859), the Bastard family of Blandford and the Smiths of Warwick, had substantial influence within an area.1 From the later eighteenth century, provincial builder-architects and architects faced increasing competition from men trained in architectural practices in London who were particularly interested in the larger, more prestigious schemes. The Wilds moved from Lewes to Brighton when the resort was expanding rapidly; it was already far ahead of other resorts in scale and social status. Its growth attracted Charles Barry and other well-connected London architects, who were competing against each other as well as against provincial practitioners. Seen in this competitive context, self-taught provincial architects such as the Wilds were remarkably successful.

Houses of the Weald and Downland: People and Houses of South-East England c. 1300-1900, by Danae Tankard, published 30 April 2012 (224 pp., Carnegie Publishing Ltd., ISBN-10: 1859362001 & ISBN-13: 9781859362006) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/501551] & West Sussex Libraries
Review by Brian Short in Sussex Past & Present no. 130, August 2013:
For many Sussex Archaeological Society members the Weald and Downland Open Air Museum (WDOAM), opened in 1970, has been a fact of life for many years, and this book comes as a refreshing reminder of the value of that collection and the enormous contribution it is making not only to architectural history but also to social, cultural and economic histories of the South East. The text is based on work undertaken by Danae Tankard as an associate on a Knowledge Transfer Partnership 2005-2008 between the University of Reading and WDOAM. The aim was to research and write the economic and social histories behind ten of the Museum's buildings, with the question to be asked 'what was life like for the people who lived in these houses?' In line with the WDOAM philosophy, none of the occupants were grand, and indeed the book reminds us also of the great service performed by the Museum in the shedding of more light on the lives of those who were on the margins of the poor and more 'middling sort', as well as the more prosperous yeoman households.
The book, well produced by Carnegie Publishing, presents material on eight of the houses (Walderton and the Beeding Toll House are omitted because the findings were too fragmentary), and includes one, Tindall's Cottage, which - at the time of writing this review - is due to be opened to the public for the first time on 'Sussex Day' 16 June 2013. The eight houses included are presented in approximately chronological sequence: the Hangleton medieval peasant house; late 14th-century Boarhunt (from the northern slope of Portsdown, Hampshire); the iconic late-medieval Bayleaf (from Chiddingstone, Kent); the earlymodern Pendean (West Lavington) and Poplar Cottage (Washington); the early 18th-century Tindall's Cottage (Ticehurst); the 19thcentury estate building, Gonville Cottage (Singleton) which is actually off site, and Whittaker's railway cottage of the 1860s (from Ashtead, Surrey).
. . .
Danae Tankard writes in her conclusion that she was impressed with the 'sheer tenacity' with which many people in Kent, Surrey and Sussex survived at all! We should be grateful to her for her well-researched but always readable insight into the lives of our ancestors. There are few quibbles: strangely she does not tell us where the Weald and Downland Museum actually is! It's easy enough, of course, to find that out for ourselves. We don't know why William Goldfinch's probate inventory was shown in the chapter on Bayleaf (pp.64-5) - there seems to be nothing in the text relating to him. One omission is perhaps any reference to the work of Jayne Kirk on the Wealden carpenter (SAC 2004; DPhil Thesis University of Sussex 2002) in the passage on carpenters in connection with Bayleaf.
This book is surely a model for the Sussex Archaeological Society, whose more unfocussed collection of buildings would benefit from similar treatment so that we could present the architectural history but also repopulate our buildings and contextualise them within Sussex society and economy.

Kent: West and the Weald, by John Newman, published 3 July 2012 (An expanded and fully revised edition of John Newman's classic survey of the buildings of West Kent, first published in 1969, Yale University Press, ISBN-10: 030018509X & ISBN-13: 9780300185096) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries

William Ranger and his artificial stone at Ickworth, by Johanna Roethe, published 2013 in The Georgian Group Journal (vol. XXI, article, pp.181-198) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/507830]

5. what do medieval buildings mean?, by Matthew H. Johnson, published 2013 in History and Theory (vol. 52, no. 3, article, pp.380-399)
The aim of this article is to review and reconsider what scholars, including historians, archaeologists, and those in other disciplines, are trying to get at when they attempt a ?social interpretation? of English late medieval domestic buildings. I focus on the definition and interpretation of ?meaning,? and I examine critically a series of concepts routinely deployed in social interpretations in the past, including my own work, such as type, zeitgeist, and intention. I argue that some of these concepts and interpretive moves are problematic and rather than aiding in our understanding, raise further questions in their turn about how buildings were lived in and understood by their medieval inhabitants. I argue for a shift in language and jargon away from ?planning? and ?meaning? to that of ?lived experience?. I explore such a possible shift with reference to different understandings of and debates over the late medieval castle of Bodiam in southeastern England. Such a shift from meaning to lived experience raises fresh challenges for the development and empirical evaluation of interdisciplinary research on medieval buildings, but it also raises fresh possibilities and insights.

Crazy Buildings: Steyning Grammar School: the Story of the Buildings on the Church Street Campus Up Until 1968, by George Barker, published 1 January 2013 (123 pp., published by the author, ISBN-10: 0954034228 & ISBN-13: 9780954034221) accessible at: British Library

The Woodsman, by Ben Law, published 28 March 2013 (256 pp., Collins, ISBN-10: 000741627X & ISBN-13: 9780007416271) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Ben Law's incredible sense of the land and his respect for age old traditions offers a wonderful insight into the life of Prickly Nut Wood. Having travelled to Papua New Guinea and the Amazon, observing age-old techniques for living in, working in and preserving forests and woodland, Ben Law felt compelled to return home and apply his learnings to a 400 year old plot of woodland near where he grew up - Prickly Nut Wood. This is the story of how he came live off the land, how he coppiced and hedged and created charcoal, how he puddled and built shelter and finally how he carved out his famous woodland home that Kevin McCloud has cited as his favourite ever Grand Design. And it's the story of the wood itself - how it lives and breathes and affects all those who encounter it, and how it's developed over the twenty years Ben has shared in its lifespan. This transporting tale that will make you long to hear the dawn chorus and wake up every day to the serene beauty of Britain's woodland.

Pevsner Architectural Guides - Sussex: East with Brighton and Hove, by Nicholas Antram, published 14 May 2013 (revised edition, xix + 751 pp. & 64 pages of plates, Yale University Press, ISBN-10: 0300184735 & ISBN-13: 9780300184730) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
The East Sussex volume of The Buildings of England covers an area ranging from the High Weald in the north of the county to the massive ridge of the South Downs and the resort towns and ancient ports of the coast. Its coastal resorts are particularly distinguished, none more so than Brighton and Hove, where John Nash's oriental Pavilion for the Prince Regent sets the tone. Elsewhere castles at Camber, Bodiam and fortified town walls at Rye and Winchelsea attest to its military past and Battle Abbey to its medieval endowments. The towns and villages are especially rich in timber-framed, brick and tile houses for which the county is famous. The twentieth century makes its mark in the exhilarating De La Warr Pavilion at Bexhill, and the uncompromising forms of the 1960s University of Sussex campus.
Review by Sabrina Harcourt-Smith in Sussex Past and Present no. 131, December 2013:
In 1951 Sir Nikolaus Pevsner (1902-1983) embarked on his landmark Buildings England series. Ever selfeffacing and modest, how pleased he would have been to foresee that in less than three decades his project would be an epic 47-volume collection of unique county guides, going into revised Second Editions.
Having settled in England in 1934, Pevsner was soon writing and publishing serious architectural studies. His dismay on finding that there was no English equivalent to Georg Dehio's portable Handbuch der Deutschen Kunstdenkmaler of c1900 drove him to found its equal in England.
On a slender budget with newly-fledged graduates as researchers, he worked tirelessly on a grinding schedule to produce two or even three volumes a year. The first edition of Sussex was published in 1965 and covered East and West Sussex, the authors being Pevsner and Ian Nairn. The present Revised Edition revealed challenges which the author, the late Nicholas Antram, has addressed and has used to produce a superb volume. Wisely, the large county of Sussex is split into two parts, of which this is the first. The successful Brighton and Hove Architectural Guide of 2008 by Antram and Richard Morrice, which used Pevsner's text as their foundation, has been incorporated into this volume. Thereby full attention is given to the magnificent places of worship in Brighton and Hove.
In his foreword Antram explains that Sussex boundary changes, new research and a wave of investigations called for overhaul and expansion of Pevsner's text, without the loss of his substance and character. Charles O'Brien's preface to his Introduction depicts an attractive Sussex with majestic Downs, historic Wealden landscapes, growing coastal towns and a rural spirit intact in many places. Valuable new sections are Geology and Building Stones by Bernard Worssam, Prehistoric, Roman and Pagan Saxon Sussex by David Rudling and background chapters which include an extensive Medieval East Sussex. In the foreword Antram also records his 'biggest debt of gratitude to David and Barbara Martin' for their expertise on East Sussex domestic buildings.The Gazeteer is the core of the book. When dipping at random into sites it is clear that the author has left no stone unturned in his task to collate the best knowledge on any building. Huge amounts of fresh information and new subjects have been incorporated at all levels and in all fields, including church furnishings and modern buildings. The addition to the text of over 60 black and white illustrations of plans, old prints of buildings and maps is attractively laid out and a great asset, as is a re-ordered Glossary with the drawings set together in the middle. Many new colour illustrations vividly display the wide range of Sussex building stones that Dr Bernard Worssam describes.
Sussex: East is a many-faceted guide book. It will be invaluable for the serious scholar, equally right for the armchair traveller or for the explorer arriving in Sussex for the first time. Pevsner's enduring genius lies at its centre; as a true inheritor of Pevsner, Nick Antram, together with his team, has continued the genius.

Crafts in context, by Michael Hall, published 16 October 2013 in Country Life (vol. 207 no. 42, article, pp.116-117) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library
Abstract:
On two museums that have recently reopened after renovations: The Wilson, Cheltenham (original architect, 1889-1907: Knight & Chatters; extended in 1987-89 by David Ross and Hugh Casson; architects for present extension: Berman Guedes Stretton) [modern extension to the original late 19th neo-Jacobean library]; and the Ditchling Museum of Art & Craft, Ditchling, East Sussex (architects for extension: Adam Richards Architects).

Iconic Adur Ferry Bridge opened, published December 2013 in Building engineer (vol. 88, no. 12, article, pp.28-29) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library
Mabey Bridge Ltd manufactured 700 tonnes of steel for this new bridge for pedestrians and cyclists at Shoreham-by-Sea. Incorporates a central swing section to allow river traffic to pass.

Haworth Tompkins finds a way to extend the listed Chichester Festival Theatre, published 2014 in RIBA Journal (vol. 121, no. 9, article, pp.12-19)

Woodsman: Living in a Wood in the 21st Century, by Ben Law, published 3 April 2014 (247 pp., London: HarperCollins Publishers Ltd., ISBN-10: 0007551924 & ISBN-13: 9780007551927) accessible at: British Library & East Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Ben Law has lived as a woodsman in Prickly Nut Wood for over 20 years. His authentic, incredible sense of the land and the wildlife, and his respect for age old traditions and how to sustain them offers a wonderful, inviting insight into the life and character of Prickly Nut Wood.

The variety and distribution of building stones used in the churches of West Sussex, England, from AD 950 to 1850, by R. J. Cordiner, published 10 May 2014 in Stone in Historic Buildings: Characterization and Performance edited by J. Cassar, M. G. Winter and B. R. Marker (pp.121-147, Geological Society, ISBN-10: 1862393761 & ISBN-13: 9781862393769)

Between a rock and hard place: House-building in Brighton and Hove, by Samer Bagaeen, published 2 October 2014 in Planning theory & practice (vol. 15, no. 4, article, pp.596-602) accessible at: British Library

Building Stones of West Sussex, by Roger Birch and Roger Cordiner, published December 2014 (349 pp., privately published by the authors, ISBN-13: 9780955125911) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library & West Sussex Libraries
Abstract:
Stone building was introduced into West Sussex first by the Romans, and later on a grand scale by the Normans. From the 11th to the mid 19th century, before the advent of easy transport by railway some 30 different types of vernacular building stones were quarried, and over 20 different types were imported by sea. The authors are both experienced geologists who have spent many years studying the rich heritage of the stone buildings of the West Sussex. With the growing awareness of the need to conserve our stone buildings the authors present the first detailed, authoratitive and lavishly illustrated account of all the building stones used in ancient buildings of the county. Each of the main building stones is described in detail under the headings of; Geology, History, Quarrying and Places to see the building stone. Building Stones of West Sussex includes comprehensive glossaries and an extensive bibliography.
This is an indespensable guide for all those interested in our building stone heritage. It will particularly appeal to geologists, historians, archaeologists, geographers, building conservators and those who wish to learn more about the rich building stone heritage of West Sussex.
Review by David Bone in Sussex Past & Present no. 135, April 2015:
The Building Stones of West Sussex by Roger Birch and Roger Cordiner is a book that has been long awaited, self-published by the authors. Superbly illustrated with examples of some 32 building stones, both as specimens and in use, this book will undoubtedly become the standard reference book for the county. The style of presentation is good and easy to follow. Each building stone is described with a section on its geology, building and history, quarrying, and places to see. Occasional snippets of text from historic sources add interesting diversions from the relatively staid academic content. My only real issue with the presentation is the random use of drop shadows around the illustrations, which distracts and is unnecessary in most cases.
Unfortunately, the book is flawed in a number of ways, full details of which cannot be presented in this short review. Of most concern are various unsupported and sometimes dubious historical or archaeological details that are presented as unqualified facts (references in the text are few). Some illustrations are incorrectly labelled and a number of churches as example locations either do not have the stone that is being discussed or the stone is so difficult to locate that they should not have been used. At least one of the minor building stone identifications appears to be incorrect.
Also, although written by geologists, some of the terminology ignores established geological usage and new terms have been introduced, such as Chichester Greensand (incorrectly implying greensand from Chichester) and Nettlestone. The latter, from the Isle of Wight, is akin to calling a Kent building stone simply Folkestone. It should be Nettlestone Rock. Unfortunately, the obvious errors cast doubt on the accuracy of the remaining content.
An excellently produced book, but does appear to suffer from inadequate peer review. Do buy it, as there won't be anything better, but treat with caution and don't quote from it without checking the facts first.

Culture, Conservation and Change: Chichester in the 1960s, by Alan H. J. Green, published 1 May 2015 (The History Press, ISBN-10: 0750961414 & ISBN-13: 9780750961417) accessible at: West Sussex Libraries

A Survivor of Storms, Hastings Old Town: an architectural history to 1750, by David and Barbara Martin, Christopher Whittick with Jane Briscoe, published 2016 (260 pp., Domtom publishing, ISBN-13: 9781906070533) accessible at: The Keep [LIB/509088] & Old Hastings Prervation Society
Abstract:
In historical times the relative success of one town over its neighbours depended upon more than the strength and wealth of its hinterland. Because of its strong castle and a harbour offering the shortest crossing to Normandy, the 11th and early 12th centuries ensured Hastings was the principal port in East Sussex. Coastal erosion subsequently robbed it of these advantages and, as a result, it was able to survive only because of its fishery, which sustained but a poor and fluctuating level of affluence. Even so, there is good survival of 15th and 17th century houses, though very few which date from either the 16th or first half of the 18th centuries. It was not until the second quarter of the 19th century that the town found a new niche as a seaside resort, a role which once more allowed it to assert its dominance over the surrounding region.

The battle of Hastings Pier; Original architect: Eugenius Birch, 1872, architects for restoration: dRMM [de Rijke Marsh Morgan], by Oliver Lowenstein, published May 2016 in Blueprint (n. 346, article, pp.118-130) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library
Abstract:
Restoration of the fire damaged Hastings Pier, dubbed the 'People's Pier' after attracting much support from the public for its revival. The new visitor centre in the middle of the pier, constructed in CLT, boasts a roof-top viewing platform. A sliding canopy that moves along the pier was part of the scheme and will hopefully be built in phase two of the restoration project.

Refurbishment : Bill Ungless reviews Fraser Brown MacKenna's retrofit of the 1960s Cockcroft Building at the University of Brighton, published July 2016 in Architecture Today (no. 270, article, pp.56-63)

Eric Parry strikes the right note at Brighton College, published October 2016 in RIBA Journal (vol. 123, no. 10, article, pp.8-12) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library

Building Hitting the high notes: Nick Hayhurst applauds Eric Parry Architects' new Music School at Brighton College, published November 2016 in Architecture Today (no. 273, article, pp.30-39) accessible at: R.I.B.A. Library