George Mallows Freeman (1852 - 1934)

by Malcolm Pratt

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G M Freeman's years of decline were not happy. The impact of his wife's death in 1928 was considerable. He then employed a greatly reduced number of staff and Mrs Freeman's not being there to ensure their reasonable efficiency had a considerable impact on the household. His sight was growing progressively worse. He ceased to employ a chauffeur and sold his formerly much prized 1918 Panhard Levasseur which then became Winchelsea's taxi. His mobility was substantially impaired largely as the result of an accident in his garden. One afternoon he was on a pair of steps trimming trees when he overbalanced, fell and broke his hip. His granddaughter remembered The Friars' estate bell being rung dramatically to summon help. He limped ever after. Malcolm Ritchie remembered him with very poor sight and very thick lenses in his glasses, 'tottering about the place with a stick'. Almost total blindness followed and he was once found by his granddaughter sitting alone at The Friars, quite unaware that darkness had fallen.

G M Freeman was buried in the graveyard of St Thomas's Church, Winchelsea on 10 March 1934.

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